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So I travelled to my FLGS in NYC today, hoping to gate last months and this months mini of the month, and saw neither....   So I grabbed some GW paints I needed refills of, and after checking

I couldn't resist. Sale rack + employee discount. Mmm bright colors

So, today started off with a surprise email from Ben Komets saying that I won his Patreon raffle for March! I am still in freak out mode.

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recently backed for 2 mantis cases on kickstarter

 

Umm don't get me started on Kickstarters... I've been really bad lately... *looks at his bleeding wallet*

 

ive been doing decent. once my credit cards are paid off ill be hitting the kickstarters again

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There are too many minis from Darksword that I want and I have ten already. I was really depressed earlier in the week as the Female Wood Elf Warrior from Darksword that I got off EBay decided to take a long ride with USPS. It took about two weeks to deliver with most of that having the tracking stuck on having it departed from its origin but not arriving anywhere. But it is here and beautiful so I am happy.

Edited by SGHawkins09
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Got my Darksword order in today and they even gave me a free figure in there! It's the Fox Knight, pretty neat little guy. Was very surprised to find it in the order with the rest of my stuff. Even more excited to get started painting all of them.

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Reconnaissance report: Knights Realm Gaming LLC, St. Mary's GA.

 

Initial observations: Family owned game store.  Wife owner behind the counter.  Could hear small children playing in another room.  Surmised they belonged to owner.  Theory proved correct when one came out to ask "Mom" something.

 

Store is clean and well lit.  Divided into two areas.  Warhammer/retail area and a back room with many tables for M:TG.  Four painted and dressed tables for Warhammer games were present in the retail area.  Actual product seemed sparse.  A dozen or so boxed sets and half a dozen blisters of mostly 40K figures.  There was a full display of Citadel Paints as well as brushes and basing materials.  So older box sets games were in a clearance section including a Blood Bowl box.

 

Two glass cases of M:TG singles along with shelves of unopened boxes and blisters.  It seems that Magic is their bread and butter, and perhaps they special order the WH figures for their customers?

 

While I was there there was a M:TG game going on in the back room, and another pair of players was sitting down as I left.

 

I inquired if they had any paint days and the owner said they occasionally have people get together to paint and sometime some of the more experienced painters hold classes to teach new painters.  They had two paint days last month, but she was unaware if there would be one in the next week.

 

I left without purchasing anything as I stopped playing WH two decades ago and I don't really play Magic any more (just with the kids occasionally).  Still if I'm painting one of the minis I brought with me and I don't have a color I need, I may go back for paint.

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If they also happen to have Heroquest, Warhammer Quest, or any of the actually cool and fun stuff that GW used to produce, you're gonna need to go back and find out if they've got a website; 'cause there's a silly Northerner that would be willing to throw money at them (might even trade them a teenager) for those gems.

Edited by Chaoswolf
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After my quick trip to the once-frozen-and-now-warm territories of the northwestern united states, I find in my possession, thanks to the sorcery of little plastic rectangular bits:

 

- Three books on color theory;

- The Zombicide base game (already being enjoyed by wife and kid);

- Two textured plasticard sheets;

- A different variant of instant glue, once recommended by Buglips;

- A set of pliers;

- Wooden squares and pedestals;

- A starter set of water-based Oils;

- A string of clear-turquoise little square beads;

- A Tropicana cap :ph34r:

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I just scored a massive haul of WOTC Chainmail miniatures from my friendly local's annual garage sale.  These things had twelve year old price tag stickers on them.  They were a buck each -- I couldn't believe they were metal.  I am now swimming in these and there are some very nice pieces.  I took all four hill giant box sets because I am greedy, and piles of other stuff.  I think my favorite right now is the Gnoll archer (there are five now assembled and waiting for primer once the weather dries out) but the Owlbear is also looking real good.  Actually, the Centaur (x 3) is also a contender.  I should have grabbed both Owlbears, but I decided to share.  Stupid me. 

 

It's nice to be prepping and gluing metal together!

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So, after months of waiting (I preorderd back in December) I finally got my painting buddha season 1.2-1.3 dvds with all the early bearded goodness.  I am not disappointed.  Say what you will about the delays, Michael delivers a quality product at a great price.

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Went to the game store to spend my "hero bucks."  I already own most every Reaper figure they have, so I went with some GW stuff.  I don't normally go Evil Empire, but they do have some cool figures.

 

Figured I'd get one of their two-army box sets.  Since their elves bore the socks off me, that nixed fantasy, so I went with a 40K set, Stormclaw.  Comes with bearded space marines and orcs, and promises to be fun to paint.  Also grabbed some wolf-riding space marines and some imperial basing material to go with it.

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      Reaper Master Series Brush-On White Primer: A few very small chips at the flex points, and some paint has scraped off a few sharp protruding areas. (Edge of the hood, finger tips on one hand.)
       
      Dupli-Color Sandable White Primer Spray: The unpainted base stayed slightly tacky to the touch for weeks after priming. The figure has several small areas where paint was scraped off, but only one chip on a flex point.
       
      Testors Dullcote Spray: This product created a good surface for painting, but performed very poorly in the paint durability tests, and I would not recommend using it as a primer substitute if you plan to use your Bones for gaming. Chips formed on the major flex points early in the Gen Con testing, and the paint has flaked off extensively from there. The figure also has some small areas of scraping damage, but those are no more notable than on the Brush-On Primer or Dupli-Color figures.
       

       
      I wanted to perform a similar test with the other surface preparation products I tried. First I painted on an additional coat or two of paint. Then I placed the figures loose in a plastic box with some other Bones, a wooden, MDF and plastic base, and a metal figure. After wrapping the box in a towel secured with rubber bands, I put it in my dryer on the air setting for 10 minutes or so. The green painted areas on each figure are those that were painted over the primer alternatives. The brown painted areas are Master Series Paint directly on the Bones surface. (These were part of tests for methods to remove mould lines.) The brown areas on each exhibit very little damage. Some have none, some have a few small chips or scrapes. (However it should be noted the brown area of this sculpt has far fewer surface protrusions than where the green was painted.)
       

       
      From left to right: Reaper Master Series Brush-On Primer White; Reaper Master Series Brush-On Sealer; Golden Airbrush Medium; Liquitex Matte Medium.
       
      Three of the four show pretty similar levels of damage. The figure painted with Brush-On Sealer as a primer displays the most paint damage of all figures tested in this series.
       

       
      From left to right: Liquitex Glazing Medium; Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium; Delta Ceramcoat All-Purpose Sealer.
       
      Damage levels are pretty similar to the better performers above. The Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium and Liquitex Glazing Medium performed the best of the seven products tested. (The Folk Art Glass & Tile Medium performed better in terms of acting as a primer, and is inexpensive, so would be my recommendation between those two.)
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