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The old Grendadier molds...


Marvin
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Probably old news, but what became of Grenadier's molds? I particularly love the "Dragon of the Month" line and would try to finish it out, at least mostly, but the originals are hard to come by. And pricey. Are they still being made?

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Mirliton has some of the molds, but I'm told they don't have the rights to go with them. That hasn't stopped them making minis. Various US companies have had some of them, but I can't think of any that are still in business and I'm not sure where those molds ended up. I know of some that went back to the original sculptors. And of course, a great deal of it was licensed D&D product which will never be made again.

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Mirliton has some of the molds, but I'm told they don't have the rights to go with them. That hasn't stopped them making minis. Various US companies have had some of them, but I can't think of any that are still in business and I'm not sure where those molds ended up. I know of some that went back to the original sculptors. And of course, a great deal of it was licensed D&D product which will never be made again.

Don't they? I've tried to find information, but all I've run across is rumor. They were easy to deal with, but if they don't have the rights -- ugh.

 

And of course we will never see the like of those old licensed and D&D minis again.

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I'm not sure about the dragons specifically, but I know that Mega Minis was producing a lot of the older Grenadier sculpts. Mega Minis is out of business, but if you check their webpage, he has links up to the companies that he sold his molds to.

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Center Stage aquired all the Personalities from Mega Minis. I wish they would release the rest of them so I could buy them.

 

 

 

sadly when  Megaminis sold them at $ 1.80 nobody buy them

 

Wasn't Mega Minis using lead?

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No, they were using the same modern alloy mixture that many companies are using these days. I bought a number of their models over the years and it was not the old grey lead stuff.

Well darn, I wish I'd known that.

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