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Another mini from the long-held stash (don't know the sculptor, unfortunately):

WP_20140610_003_zps1260a2ec.jpg

 

WP_20140610_002_zps9ab9ad92.jpg

 

Wrong color green for a troglodyte, I suppose. Anyway, I finally got some washes (from Reaper), so I tried washing this guy wth the brown. I can't tell if it worked or not. I did a little bit of lining after it. And highlighting. I'm not sure what the wash accomplished. Meh. I'm pleased with how it came out, all in all, though I'm sure there are lessons to be learned, here. Please, tell me what they are.

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There's not a painter on this forum who hasn't heard this advice a dozen times, so I'll start with "more contrast!" Higher highlights and deeper shadows! Go way darker than looks reasonable and way lighter than could possibly natural. From up close, and after staring at it for hours, it'll look absurd, but the tiny size of the mini really necessitates exaggeration.

 

The wash looks like it didn't do much. Try a thicker wash and/or more layers; make sure you don't let it pool though.

 

Looks like you have good solid coverage and placement, so that's a great foundation to work from. Good work!

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For what I think you are trying to accomplish with the brown "wash" you actually want a glaze. A glaze is similar to a wash except for two important differences. A glaze is thinner than a wash. With a glaze you will also want to, after soaking some up with your paintbrush, take most of it off with a cloth (one that doesn't loosen fibers easily) or a sponge until it is very thin. If you want a good way to test a glaze you can grab a page that has something printed on it and mark a line over the text with your glaze. If it's thin enough to read the words perfectly under it, then you have a good glaze. Glazes affect the layers of paint underneath them but are thin enough to not do it as drastically as a wash. Using a color that is very different from your base coat as a glaze will really make your mini pop more as well. Also, there are some colors, that when used as a glaze, that can pull more on shadows and highlights.

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That is... not quite right. The difference between a wash and a glaze is not in the substance itself (both are highly-thinned paints or inks, but neither is necessarily thinned more than the other). Rather, the difference is in application: washes are applied somewhat more heavily, and are allowed to pool in crevices, creating the illusion of shadow. Glazes are applied evenly and not allowed to pool, so they cover an area evenly, and are typically done in many layers to slowly build up rich colors, or otherwise alter the underlying area. To create shadow easily, a simple dark wash over the whole figure is sufficient, though it won't look as nice as a more precise application. Basically, a wash and a glaze are the same until you put it on the mini, and then where and how it's applied will determine which it is.

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Yuck! Trogs, hate those disgusting things!

 

Nice job on the painting of them up, I agree with the above posters on how to improve upon what you've done.

 

Wash vs. Glaze = two schools of thought on consistency of the paint. I feel that a glaze is a bit thinner than a wash (Mr. M) more opaque, but it really comes down to personal preferences in the end.

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Thanks for all the helpful advice and info, folks.

 

He looks fine to me.

You could bring his eyes to life by inserting a small black vertical line. It will create a reptilian eye that way, just make it a really fine line.

 

I like him, you did a good job there.

Also, troglodyte, underworld dweller, so maybe enhance the base with some mushrooms, rocks and stuff. That way he will transform from really good to awesome.

 

Keep showing your work.

 

That's a nifty idea for the eyes. Much appreciated.

 

The base, though, I'm not sure I'm ready for. I visited the sculpting forum for the first time. Read the pinned thread on making bases out of Super Sculpey or whatnot. It sounds doable, actually, but I remain intimidated and 99.9% ignorant, I think, of all involved with it.

 

There's not a painter on this forum who hasn't heard this advice a dozen times, so I'll start with "more contrast!" Higher highlights and deeper shadows! Go way darker than looks reasonable and way lighter than could possibly natural. From up close, and after staring at it for hours, it'll look absurd, but the tiny size of the mini really necessitates exaggeration.

 

The wash looks like it didn't do much. Try a thicker wash and/or more layers; make sure you don't let it pool though.

 

Looks like you have good solid coverage and placement, so that's a great foundation to work from. Good work!

 

I think I've heard it a dozen times or so already, lol. I'm working hard to up my highlights, actually--I keep using higher and higher tones so it looks differentiated up-close and in-person. I'm having a hard time finding that next level, though. It's frustrating, and I'm starting to worry that I should feel embarrassed but am too daft to realize it or something. I'm just kind of blasting ahead and assuming I'll eventually get a better handle on it, but I can't see it, yet.

 

 

I was really excited about the washes, thinking they'd really give me a breakthrough with shadowing and all. The Internet in gerneral sure seems to rave about them. But thickening the wash/more layers with the wash, I can definitely try that. I thinned it pretty well on the first go.

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