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Ok, this is probably as much a vent as a question ... but why on earth do so many folks insist on priming their miniatures black (before selling them to me on ebay)?

 

Yes, I know it's more or less the standard (priming them white is the other "standard").

I also know that if you have a model that you want in brighter colors, you should prime white, if it's a "darker" model, prime black ...

Priming black also might help to put shadows in places you cannot reach well with your brush?

 

But to me, priming black just does not seem to work ...

 

- some colors don't cover black well, my yellow for example ...

and even a couple of thin coats do not work well ...yeah, see above ... if you want light colors, prime white ...

so why do people almost reflexively prime black ... don't tell me they never ever wanted to put some yellow - or light red - on those miniatures ...

or is that the reason why they are selling the minis so cheap on ebay?

 

- bigger problem even: I seem unable to see all the detail if a miniature is primed black ... all I see is a black glob ... yes, I can use liner or drybrushing to bring out the detail, but that sounds like an additional step of work ...

 

For me, priming the miniatures in light grey seems to work best ...

 

Any thoughts?

 

 

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Since your figures are already primed black, partially spray them grey primer (or acrylic spray paint), then lesser white, for a shadow effect, similar to zenithal airbrushing:     If you want fu

I am actually doing the whole "black with progressive lighter shades from zenital position" with the airbrush now, still experimenting (here halfway through):     I really like how it defines sha

The only consensus we have here is that there's no consensus about the "one true way" to do anything. 

Black isn't that hard to cover with light colours - if you basecoat with something else over the black primer, before your yellow/red/pink/whatever step. What it does do, rather nicely, is allow you some "sloppiness" in your painting - if you don't get every single hard to reach crevice when you've primed white, it stands out like a spotlight. With black, it just gives you some darker shading.

 

It's easier to do metallics over black primer.

 

It's easier to do blacklining with black primer - just leave a little space unpainted between your areas, and bam! Done.

 

These days, I usually start from white primer (Reaper brush-on) washed with a dark ink (Army Painter Strong or Dark Ink), or else Brown Liner (for Bones), but I'll still prime something black and then drybrush it with white. One of my favorite techniques, as a matter of fact.

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Grey, by the way, really strikes me as the worst of both words. Just as glaring as white... no dark shadows like black. Sure, you can see details a little better than you can with straight black - but still not as good as you can black-with-white-drybrush. :unsure: There was a point near the end of my Warmachine playing/painting (just before I went dormant until Bones I woke me up again) that I thought grey primer was the bee's knees, and I still have heaps of grey models laying about.

 

I need a gallon jug of Simple Green, and a really big bucket... <_<

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Thank you both. Priming white and then adding a wash is - besides priming grey - what I'm doing now.

 

Not sure that metallic colors are easier to do over black ... I have not yet noticed any big difference (might depend on the brand of metallic one uses? Seems that metallic colors differ quite a bit depending on the company behind?).

 

Ub3r ... that's a very interesting read (though it will take me some time to digest it).

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Well, remember that every painter paints to their own drum (or... something...)

 

White-with-a-wash and black-with-white-drybrush (and Brown Liner on Bones, although I'm experimenting with Pure Black instead) work well for me. Grey might work best for you. ^_^ I wish you luck and joy in painting.

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There are many cons and pros about white or black as basecoat... it is one of the big debates in mini painting.

 

Simply put, you chose what works for you. 

 

I myself love black over white as an undercoat, and I am not ashamed to admit it. I don't have trouble covering except with transparent colors, and that is solved by using another undercoat of a similar, more covering color (like buff or caqui for yellow / light skin).

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Kakhi 'round these parts. :;):

 

Khaki last I checked.  Or is that an alternate spelling?
  

*Khaki

 

:rolleyes:

 

 

Khaki last I checked.  Or is that an alternate spelling?

 

 

Beat me to it.  :lol:

Willen habla Español, mis hombres. Let's not all dog him about spelling esoteric English words at once, huh? :;):
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I actually like grey for bones that are going to get a light paint scheme. of course that's using either grey liner or brown liner brightened up a bit with pure white. I'm finding for my earthier figures, priming black is working well. I picked up a bottle of GW imperial primer a while back. Crappy stuff, but it sticks well to Bones, so I use that as a base at present.

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