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I lost the 5 lbs I gained between vacation and pumpkin scones :)

Now to keep at it....

 

That was fast wasn't it? Did you crash diet or excercise? What's the secret?

 

 

I'm chubby. If I watch what I eat I lose 5-7lbs the first week. When you are at 227lbs losing 5lbs isn't a bunch. :)

Plus unhealthy food can cause you to bloat up so some of the weight you lose the first week is "water weight" being flushed out.

When we don't watch what we eat we order out a lot of total crap like pizza.

My ankle also feels better so I am skipping the bus and walking to the train, that isn't very far though, only 20 minutes if I walk fast.

 

When I was first starting on this path, a 20 minute walk was HUGE for me. 

 

I believe in you!

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I have been invited to participate in a half marathon (13.1 mile run/21.08km run) in late March 2016.

 

I officially began training for it today. The idea is for me to spend my main workouts each week like this:

...

I have sought advice from trainers on hydration, so I'm good there. We got a camelbak so I can carry water with me on training runs of greater than 5k, (which will be every weekend) and we have routes planned for me to train which include stops at places where water is otherwise available should I run without it.

...

Oh right, Texas.  Where you do actually need to worry about hydration between the months of October and March.  Good luck!  It will be a lot of fun I'm sure.

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I have been invited to participate in a half marathon (13.1 mile run/21.08km run) in late March 2016.

 

<snip>

 

Wish me luck!

First: Woo! That sounds like fun! ::D: Half marathons are long enough to be hard, but short enough not to be brutal. Finishing your first is quite an accomplishment, and your target pace seems very reasonable for the amount of time you have to train and where you are right now. 

 

Second: I'll wish you luck, but I don't think you need much of it. You really just need to keep being interested in doing it. ::): Put in the miles, pay attention to your diet, and you'll be fine!

 

Third: Where'd you get that training plan? Was it from a pro trainer, or just something you came up with?

 

Fourth: If you want any thoughts from someone who's done the couch-to-half-marathon thing fairly recently, let me know. ::): 

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I have been invited to participate in a half marathon (13.1 mile run/21.08km run) in late March 2016.

 

<snip>

 

Wish me luck!

First: Woo! That sounds like fun!  :zombie:  Half marathons are long enough to be hard, but short enough not to be brutal. Finishing your first is quite an accomplishment, and your target pace seems very reasonable for the amount of time you have to train and where you are right now. 

 

Second: I'll wish you luck, but I don't think you need much of it. You really just need to keep being interested in doing it. ::): Put in the miles, pay attention to your diet, and you'll be fine!

 

Third: Where'd you get that training plan? Was it from a pro trainer, or just something you came up with?

 

Fourth: If you want any thoughts from someone who's done the couch-to-half-marathon thing fairly recently, let me know. ::):

 

FIFY.

 

:;):

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I have been invited to participate in a half marathon (13.1 mile run/21.08km run) in late March 2016.

 

<snip>

 

Wish me luck!

First: Woo! That sounds like fun! ::D: Half marathons are long enough to be hard, but short enough not to be brutal. Finishing your first is quite an accomplishment, and your target pace seems very reasonable for the amount of time you have to train and where you are right now. 

 

Second: I'll wish you luck, but I don't think you need much of it. You really just need to keep being interested in doing it. ::): Put in the miles, pay attention to your diet, and you'll be fine!

 

Third: Where'd you get that training plan? Was it from a pro trainer, or just something you came up with?

 

Fourth: If you want any thoughts from someone who's done the couch-to-half-marathon thing fairly recently, let me know. ::):

 

I have a training app from Adidas, but also read a ton of articles from Runnersworld and a few others I cannot remember, and basically all of them present very similar advice. Most of them advised increasing the run distance on the LONG run every other week by 1.5 miles per two week cycle, but since I have greater than 15 weeks (most plans are 15 week plans) I changed it to the shorter 1.5 kilometers per two weeks, and +1 Km to the short run per two weeks instead of +1 mile to the short runs. (the conventional wisdom presented was "3+1", that is, start with 3miles, +1mile every two weeks for the short runs)  In the end, this gets me the same place in 23 weeks that the other plans would get me in 15 weeks, and pushes me a little less hard, which is ok since I still have ~25 lbs to lose in the intervening months. One hopes my new plan of ~20-40km/week running helps with that goal, right? ;)

 

The basic hydration guideline is a minimum of 16oz (~450ml) per hour of running, and at my pace a half marathon is a 2.5 hour gig, so I'll need not less than 1 liter of water. The recommended maximum is 60oz per hour (of ACTIVE running and sweating), and they experts say that to know where exactly in the 16-60oz range one falls, one should 'listen to one's thirst' and drink slowly and deliberately, noting when one is no longer thirsty.  For me, personally, my experience so far is that 20oz/hr seems like it's a good solid amount for me, but I'll be making a running diary and noting those results better now that I'll actually be running an hour a day for most of my runs (whereas until now I've run for an hour maybe 6 times total ever). Among the data I'll collect in the diary will be my pre-running weight, my post running weight, and my water intake during the run. Most advice says to intake roughly what you expel, so we'll see how close my thirst is to that measurement. Most marathons place water at 2 mile intervals, so I'll be using that as a guide and consuming water at ~3 to 3.5km intervals (I have a FitSmart fitness and that announces every 1km achieved, so this is fairly easy for me to track, Basically when the voice tells me "distance 3km/6km/9km/12km/15km/18km/21km" Drink!"). I'll weigh my camelbak bladder before and after the practice run.  Partly because I'm serious about doing this as healthy as I can, and partly because the science has me intrigued.

 

Add to this that I will be following the US Marine Corps marathon guidelines, which has their team run 5 minutes, walk (fast walk) one. They suggest a minimum pace of 14:00/mile, (8.6 minutes/km) so as long as I'm meeting that I think I'm great. I intend right now to practice the endurance portions of the run - basically the first hour as all run (Which I can do at this point with ease), and then begin the 5:1 Marines practice.  

 

Add to all of this - the marines give a 7 hour maximum completion time for a full marathon, or 3.5 hours for a half. My goal is 2.5 hours, although, and this is key in my mind, If I finish this half marathon AT ALL, I'm going to be telling the whole world "I WON". My goal has nothing to do with being the first across the line, or coming in before 3:30pm (the race begins at 1pm). My goal is to FINISH. For me, Finishing at ALL is Victory.

 

Why is my goal so 'weak sauce'? Because March of 2015 I could not run for five solid minutes. To be able to run for 13 miles across 2.5, 3, 3.5 or whatever hours one year later IS a victory.

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Signing up for a half marathon is more than I would do. Hats off to you! 

 

So... just over a year before RCon. I'm gonna have to set myself some Reaper goals. 

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OH MY GLOB I just learned the coolest trick to converting Miles and Kilometers!  (i'm declaring this as related to the weightless thread since we were talking runs and using miles and kilometers)

 

Ya'll know the fibonacci sequence,right? That thing where each number is the sum of the previous two numbers?

 

Well, for back of the envelope calculations, (not for serious science) the Fibonacci Sequence is the Km to Miles conversion chart!

 

0 1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 etc

 

ok, so dig this, starting at 2, 2 miles is 3 km.   5 km is 3 miles.

 

8km is 5 miles 

 

13km is 8 miles, but 13 miles is 21 km!  Crazy!  So All this time I've been googling everything to convert distances in my American Brain, and it's been there the whole time!

 

Not only that, it works (kinda) for non sequence numbers. 26 isn't on the chart but 21 and 5 are. So 26km is 21km+5km, or 13 miles +3miles, or 16 miles! 

 

Mind = Blown.

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For the half-marathon I did, there was water and Gatorade every mile. Mostly I just stuck to the water, but once I felt like I needed something more, grabbed a Gatorade and really regretted it.  Disgusting stuff and rough on a dry mouth.  You should already be able to find out where your race has water in the race guide.

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Huh... That fibonacci trick isn't something I'd heard of before... I guess we know what the approximate ratio is for the fibonacci sequence then. ::): 

 

Anyway: Training plan! Since it's homebrew, I don't mind offering my suggestions... ::P: I'd suggest taking a look at the Hal Higdon half-marathon training plans. (There's a shop on his site or I'd link it.) When I did my races, I was using a plan devised by The Running Room, which I believe is roughly based on Hal Higdon's schedules but adds in hill training & speedwork even for the novices. If your body can handle the hills (which mostly comes down to whether it hurts your knees) I highly recommend throwing some of that in on Wednesday nights. It's hard and the first week or two kinda suck, but after that you build up so much leg strength that it becomes fun. And it makes a huge difference on race day. Hills are always hard, but it's rather gratifying to hit a hill in a race and watch everyone around you just die while you power your way on up... ::): A lot of people have had tremendous success with the Running Room plan and a lot more have had success with the Hal Higdon plan... You might find they're not for you but certainly worth considering.

 

One thing that's not mentioned in any of the plans is to make sure that your prep for the long runs largely matches your prep for the race. Make sure you have the same breakfast before your long runs as you're planning to have before your race, for example. In my case, that was fried potatoes (I described it earlier in the thread). Feel free to experiment from week to week during training, but the last few weeks you should be settling on something and sticking with it. That way you'll know exactly how your body will react on race day.  This particular bit of advice is from personal experience. Nothing's quite as annoying as starting a race with stomach pain... Learn from my stupidity and don't repeat it. ::P: Similarly, if you're planning on using energy gels (e.g. Gu) during the race, try them out at the end of your long runs beforehand so you'll know if you're one of the folks whose stomach reacts poorly to them. You don't want to find that out 10km into your race with no bathrooms in sight... :zombie:  If you're going to drink Gatorade on race day, drink Gatorade during your long runs (for the same reason as above). Etc, etc. Basically, if you want race day to be fun, you should be doing your best to set it up so it's pretty much just another run. ::): 

 

 

... OK, I'll try to settle down. I really enjoyed running half marathons, they're super fun, so I'm probably getting a little carried away in my excitement for you. :lol: 

 

 

And just for fun: Here's a picture I made after completing my first half marathon (hopefully the img link works...)

 

tumblr_lsklscedxH1r4o5xco1_1280.png

 

(The pic doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I felt amazing. Freakishly exhausted, but amazing.)

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To fans of marathons and/or long distance running (this includes my brother who ran one marathon and his girlfriend who regularly runs marathons):
 
The DOs and Do NOTs of running your first marathon - by The Oatmeal
 
The terrible and wonderful reasons why I run long distances - by The Oatmeal (a lot of us can relate to the Blerch)

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The Oatmeal has a special place in my heart.

 

So many awesome running regimens by you guys here! We've decided that once we've gotten into the rhythm of eating right, we're going to look for a pool that we can swim in. My better half loves swimming and it's easier on him, and I would love to be a better swimmer.

 

... I'd love to have that swimmer's body one day too!  ::P:

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As long as you filter the Oatmeal's advice through the Oatmeal filter, it's actually really good advice for race day. :lol: 

 

 

... I'd love to have that swimmer's body one day too!  ::P:

And you'd love him to have that swimmer's body one day too, AMIRITE? ::P: 

 

I actually really wish I knew how to swim properly. I can doggy paddle like a champion but that's about it. :lol: 

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Huh... That fibonacci trick isn't something I'd heard of before... I guess we know what the approximate ratio is for the fibonacci sequence then. ::):

 

Anyway: Training plan! Since it's homebrew, I don't mind offering my suggestions... ::P: I'd suggest taking a look at the Hal Higdon half-marathon training plans. (There's a shop on his site or I'd link it.) When I did my races, I was using a plan devised by The Running Room, which I believe is roughly based on Hal Higdon's schedules but adds in hill training & speedwork even for the novices. If your body can handle the hills (which mostly comes down to whether it hurts your knees) I highly recommend throwing some of that in on Wednesday nights. It's hard and the first week or two kinda suck, but after that you build up so much leg strength that it becomes fun. And it makes a huge difference on race day. Hills are always hard, but it's rather gratifying to hit a hill in a race and watch everyone around you just die while you power your way on up... ::): A lot of people have had tremendous success with the Running Room plan and a lot more have had success with the Hal Higdon plan... You might find they're not for you but certainly worth considering.

 

One thing that's not mentioned in any of the plans is to make sure that your prep for the long runs largely matches your prep for the race. Make sure you have the same breakfast before your long runs as you're planning to have before your race, for example. In my case, that was fried potatoes (I described it earlier in the thread). Feel free to experiment from week to week during training, but the last few weeks you should be settling on something and sticking with it. That way you'll know exactly how your body will react on race day.  This particular bit of advice is from personal experience. Nothing's quite as annoying as starting a race with stomach pain... Learn from my stupidity and don't repeat it. ::P: Similarly, if you're planning on using energy gels (e.g. Gu) during the race, try them out at the end of your long runs beforehand so you'll know if you're one of the folks whose stomach reacts poorly to them. You don't want to find that out 10km into your race with no bathrooms in sight... :zombie:  If you're going to drink Gatorade on race day, drink Gatorade during your long runs (for the same reason as above). Etc, etc. Basically, if you want race day to be fun, you should be doing your best to set it up so it's pretty much just another run. ::):

 

 

... OK, I'll try to settle down. I really enjoyed running half marathons, they're super fun, so I'm probably getting a little carried away in my excitement for you. :lol:

 

 

And just for fun: Here's a picture I made after completing my first half marathon (hopefully the img link works...)

 

tumblr_lsklscedxH1r4o5xco1_1280.png

 

(The pic doesn't even come close to doing it justice. I felt amazing. Freakishly exhausted, but amazing.)

Love the picture! I think I may make my own when this is over.

 

good advice. I've actually decided that I'm going to go with the plan that my Device has on it for doing a half-marathon. It's slightly different, but the basics are the same - short runs, long runs, fixed kinds of challenges, speed, endurance, etc.

 

I'm unfamiliar with these Gel things you're talking about. But I'm interested in hearing more.

 

Also, the more we talk the more I think we may in fact be twins, because I also do not swim... 

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Love the picture! I think I may make my own when this is over.

 

good advice. I've actually decided that I'm going to go with the plan that my Device has on it for doing a half-marathon. It's slightly different, but the basics are the same - short runs, long runs, fixed kinds of challenges, speed, endurance, etc.

 

I'm unfamiliar with these Gel things you're talking about. But I'm interested in hearing more.

 

Also, the more we talk the more I think we may in fact be twins, because I also do not swim... 

 

Definitely do something to celebrate after you win (ie complete) your first! It's a big accomplishment, and worth commemorating. ::): 

 

Sounds like a decent plan then. ::): Really, the key thing to any plan is to get enough miles in, and also to get enough rest to not injure yourself. The rest is mostly just picking what you enjoy. If you're trying to be an elite runner or something, the details really matter... otherwise, the most important thing is to make sure you keep enjoying it, or you'll give up. ::): 

 

The gel things are basically concentrated sugar/electrolyte/other stuff mixed into a gel form. They generally taste pretty weird when you're not running, and pretty decent if you're like 10K into a run, which is a weird experience. ::): Some people find they really help give an extra kick later in the race by giving you a ready source of energy around the time your body's running out of its easy reserves. Personally, I've had mixed luck with them - sometimes they really help (especially the ones with a ton of caffeine) and sometimes they actually mess me up and make me more tired. My theory is that it's throwing off my blood sugar and sometimes my body can handle it and sometimes it can't. I've stopped using them, but that also hurts towards the end of a long run when my body starts chewing into the harder reserves, because it means more lactic acid buildup, etc. Do a search for "gu gel" and you'll find them pretty quick. And if you decide to try them out, definitely make sure that the first time you try one you'll be near a bathroom shortly after - some people don't react well to them, especially 10K+ into a run. ::): 

 

I'm still planning on asking for the title "Space Clone" in... 392 posts. ::P: 

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