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Sugar is another thing yes.

However some of the artificial sweeteners are even worse for you.

 

It's difficult to eat both healthy and yummie.

 

My way is, eat what I like and try to be modest, if aware of the healthier option, that's what I'll take.

 

We can't know all. And we are being lied to sometimes.

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@Canuckotter, I make a similar sweet and sour chicken using Alton Brown's recipe.  It's high in sugars so I adjust a little and we don't eat it often but it sure is good over brown rice. 

 

Roasting chicken bones for stock is good, but it's hard to get thigh bones out. I definitely keep breastbones and any whole carcasses.  As soon as it gets really cold I'll be cleaning out my freezer and making a couple gallons of chicken stock.  

 

The lazy cook's helper is the supermarket rotisserie chicken.  They are usually on sale one day a week, and cost about the same as an uncooked chicken. We eat half of one for dinner, have parts for lunch the next day, then I pick the carcass and make chicken salad or pot pie, and freeze the bones for stock. 

 

The other thing I do to avoid cooking is make double batches, especially soups. Then it's easy to just pull out and heat. 

 

@Morihalda, that was one of the hard parts of learning to cook, figuring out what I could do with different cuts.  Pork Loin is where pork chops come from, it can be roasted.  Pork chops you pan fry until they're not pink in the middle.  Pork tenderloin is the filet mignon of the pig, good roasted or grilled whole.  Country ribs get baked or put in the crock pot for 4 hours and you get pulled pork for sandwiches or tacos.  Pork butt or shoulder baked or smoked all day is great if you want to feed all your friends. It's the 'pot roast'.   Speaking of which, Alton Brown's chuck pot roast recipe is excellent, despite the weird ingredients. 

 

Garlic or onion powder is good on steaks and in burgers. 

Sounds like you and my wife follow the same playbook when it comes to meals! ::): (She does the cooking because she gets home first.) The supermarket rotisserie chicken especially is REALLY handy, although with the composting program in Ottawa we've discovered that we can only do that on the weekend because the composting gets picked up on Monday, and leaving all the leftover scraps in the compost longer than a couple days is a good way to turn the compost bin disgusting. (Don't ask.) 

 

And garlic goes well with virtually anything that's not really sweet. I really, really wish my body didn't freak out any time I ate it.  :down:

 

Ooh! Another really simple dish, if you don't mind spending a bit of time mostly just hanging out, is to take potatoes, cut them into smallish cubes (about 3/8" is ideal), put the cubes into a big bowl with some concentrated lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and rosemary, mix it all up, and then put it in the microwave on the potato setting (if yours has one - otherwise, just nuke 'em until they start getting softish, you'll need to look that up but it's pretty straightforward I think). Once that's done, toss the whole thing into a pan on medium heat with a bit more oil and fry 'em up to taste. The microwaving isn't strictly required but it saves a lot of time. I find it tends to take anywhere between 30 and 60 minutes in the pan before they're done, but I also like them extra crispy. Mostly I bring a book to the kitchen and read that and just look up and stir up the potatoes every once in a while. You can make large batches this way, and if you have 10 minutes in the morning you can reheat the potatoes in a pan the next morning and make a fantastic breakfast (this was my breakfast before all my long runs & races). Heck, I've had this as my supper a few times when I was alone in the house. ::): Normally it's best as a side dish, but since it's easy to make large batches, you can make enough to have extra to reheat for a couple other meals later in the week. Not as good for work lunches, since the potatoes get mushy if you try to reheat them in the microwave, but for weeknight meals or weekends, it's great.

 

Another option - a good chili can be an excellent healthy meal. Make it in a large batch, focus on lots of veggies & beans (my favourite trick: make homemade refried beans with minimal extra oil or salt, and mix that in with the sauce along with whole beans... It makes it thick, rich, hearty, and healthy, and even people who aren't fans of beans generally enjoy it) and put it into containers and put them in the freezer. Boom, you've got a bunch of really healthy, really hearty meals perfect for bringing to work and heating up in the microwave.

 

 

For pork, try marinading it for a while ahead of cooking it... If I'm making something, I tend to mix up some sort of marinade involving apple juice or cider (it's been a while so I don't remember the rest of the recipe other than having lots of rosemary, but I mostly made it up on the fly anyway so...) and for a big chunk of meat like a tenderloin I'll start the marinade the night before, or for smaller pieces I'll sometimes just put them together before I leave for work. It's super simple, as long as you remember to prepare a bit ahead of time, and leaves the meat a lot more tender and gives it a lot more flavour than you'd otherwise get.

 

 

And in case anyone's wondering - I'm only including foods that were a significant part of my diet when I was losing weight and then maintaining the loss while also doing long-distance running, like half marathons. May or may not fit with any particular diet, but if they do work for you, then great! More options! ::): 

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In the Netherlands it is sold as paprika powder. A Paprika is a red bell pepper. So maybe you can find it like that.

It is a very good spice, any meat will benefit from a little of that mixed with a little pepper and garlic.

 

There are a lot of nice mixes to you can buy.

 

[snip]

In the US we have Seasoned Salt, which is a blend of salt, sugar, garlic powder and paprika. It is good on anything. Except maybe breakfast cereal. It's what they use on rotisserie chickens and on restaurant steaks.

 

This^

 

I season primarily with season salt.  Particularly Lawrey's Season Salt.  Goes good on just about everything.  Chicken, pork, and beef.  (Look, I used an Oxford comma).  For steaks, I like to use a mix of the Black Pepper Season Salt and the regular Season Salt (I like little more pepper on my steaks but the Black Pepper Season Salt isn't salty enough by itself for me).  Montreal Steak seasoning just seems too coarse for me. I always get bite that have too much spice and spot that have too little.  Most Season Salts are of a fine grind.

 

Another good choice for pork and chicken is AHSO Sauce.  It's basically the sauce they use to make Chinese Spare ribs.  I love to put it on Country Style spare ribs after cooking them on the grill.  Make grill cleanup a little more difficult due to the higher sugar content.

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I love a good chili this time of year. Use ground turkey for the lower fat and then a good beef base paste (not bullion) and it will taste like beef. I like to put in chopped sweet potatoes, or scoop out a roasted butternut squash to add body. If you puree the squash with the tomato sauce nobody will ever know it is there. You can also boil and puree carrots to add more vegetables.

 

We have a low sodium diet, too, but sometimes Seasoned Salt is just invaluable for a quick dinner, especially grilling.

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I'm onto puree'd food now.  On them for another week.

 

Got a "stew" in the slow cooker that involves lentils, chickpeas, mince (easier to puree than chunks), carrots, vegetable mix from freezer starting to look freezer burnt, tomato pulp, garlic, onions, herbs + spices.

 

I have found that scrambled eggs are my friends.  As are baked custards, both sweet (stevia sweetener) & savory (chicken pureed, fresh salmon pureed etc).  High in protein, good texture, low carb, tasty!

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If you were on vacation, there's a decent chance you had a different routine. Different amounts of time spent sitting vs standing, different water intake, different sleep times maybe... Any of those could lead to random weight fluctuations, primarily just water retention. As Marvin pointed out, some of it could also be muscle - if you were getting better rest while on vacation your body might have taken advantage of the opportunity to build some extra muscle. 

 

As for me... I lifted heavy things yesterday and went for a run today. I'm practically a fitness-y person or something now! ::P: I also appear to have lost around 1.5 pounds in the last week, which I primarily attribute to my body deciding to dump water.

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Got the bulk of our shopping done for starting next week.... chicken bacon alfredo, stuffed peppers, and bacon and egg breakfast "muffins" are going to be some of the highlights. We decided we'd rather get in the habit of eating right for a few weeks, and then adding exercise after. Too many changes at once last time made it too easy to forget.  :wacko:

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Just been sick.

 

Next week I will start excercise again.

Weight lifting and running and such.

 

Also I find myself being seduced by crisps and chocolate way too often...

 

I'm not superheavy but I'd like to lose my little belly and about 6kg

Edited by Xherman1964
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After major heart surgery, and months of relative inactivity (some of it imposed), I'm glad to see that my weight hasn't changed all that much (average about 210lbs).

 

Next week I'm seeing my cardiologist for a followup exam and a stress test (treadmill + monitors) to be allowed to return to work. What I especially want is the approval to join a gym again for some more serious training.

 

Simply walking isn't enough for me (unless it's uphill), and one of my knees is bad enough that I can't run without risk of injury. So low impact gym equipment is what I need, and good gyms require a doctor's note if the client has a health condition.

 

My cardiologist may delay that note until after a full three months of surgery recovery have gone by, which will lead me to mid-November.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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