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Glazes and washes and wet palettes


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I really like my wet palette for not letting paints dry out.

 

My question is about dealing with washes and glazes. Do you try to do that on the wet palette or just mix it up separately? I would imagine that doing it on the wet palette would be ... messy, but, I haven't tried it...

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I do all my washes and glazes on the wet palette if I only need a small amount. But it all depends on the paper; if yours is kinda waxy and the paint beads up, it will remain contained. If it is the kind that gets too wet, then no, thinning a lot is impossible for me, it just gets sucked into the paper/water.

 

If you put a drop of water down, does it bead, or does it disperse? If it is the first one and you are just doing a little glaze for touching a few spots, then it is doable (and I usually do it).

 

Welcome, BTW. Enjoy your painting, and the forum!

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I have used and do not recommend the special palette paper that comes with the commercial wet palettes. Instead, I recommend baker's parchment. The specific brand that I use is Reynolds.

 

With the parchment, the paint doesn't noticeably penetrate the paper, nor does it dilute much if at all unless I actually add water.

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Paper towel, preferably the more absorbent kind

 

Parchment paper, NOT wax paper. Wax paper sucks, doesn't let moisture through and paints dry much faster, also because they bead they dont stay where you put them.

Theres three keys to my palette, photo doesn't show #3 however.

1. The primary surface for paint

2. the edge of paper towel, I can wipe my brush on it quickly to dilute my brush if the paint is too thick, this is great for blending, especially if you really want to do "two brush blending" but think the second brush is totally unecessary like I do.

3. a reservoir of water that lays around the towel in the plate. I can use this(often clean fresh water) to bring some water onto the palette faster than dipping into a cup, also it lets me keep paint on my brush because I grab just a dab.


 

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Edited by Minx Studio
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I think the reason Reynolds works so well in a wet palette is that it's first a very high density paper and second it's also treated with silicone (to withstand baking temps and for nonstick properties). There are much cheaper varieties of baking parchment out there that are treated with something else, but I've found the silicone-treated parchment holds up better (I can reuse the silicone stuff multiple times when baking a large batch of cookies, for example). I learned to make wet palettes with the Reynolds paper, and so far it's working great.

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Bringing this topic up again but simply to put out there how awesome a wet palette is. I made mine tonight and the painting experience was so much better. Not a drop of my precious paint was wasted do to getting tacky or drying out and my speed increased immensely. If you are a new painter and are thinking that you don't need a wet palette to do your thing you are definitely right but you are depriving yourself of a really awesome tool. Search Youtube and make your own they are super easy and super cheap.

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I have used and do not recommend the special palette paper that comes with the commercial wet palettes. Instead, I recommend baker's parchment. The specific brand that I use is Reynolds.

 

With the parchment, the paint doesn't noticeably penetrate the paper, nor does it dilute much if at all unless I actually add water.

Yep, reynolds is the stuff. The only thing i have used that penetrates it is the badger ghost tints.

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The three most important things I learned about tools to paint minis: buy the best brushes, thin your paints and use a wet palette.

 

I've mentioned it elsewhere, but to reiterate: I just use a ceramic dinner plate with a high lipped edge. Two thick, quilted paper towels (I use Bounty brand) and parchment paper (Reynolds brand) trimmed to be about a half inch smaller than the paper towels. Place in the plate, soak until the parchment no longer curls, drain off the excess water leaving the paper towel saturated. I put plastic wrap over the plate between sessions.

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