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02829 Bertand Monk + 02797 Taenar

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Hey all, first post here. Just wanted to show off my new mini, it's a combination of two Reaper minis. I wanted the look of sort of a Diablo 3 monk, bald with a beard, but I couldn't really find what I wanted. I really liked the body from the Bertand Monk, so I decided to take a swing at combining it with another head. I like how it came out, although Hi Res isn't kind to my paint job.

 

Body mini: http://www.reapermini.com/graphics/gallery/4/02829_G.jpg

Head mini: http://www.reapermini.com/graphics/gallery/4/02797_G.jpg

 

post-13412-0-67895900-1404741792_thumb.jpg

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Nice conversion and color choices, he looks like a grizzled monk who's all out of bubblegum.

 

Welcome to the forums!

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Thanks for the compliments and the welcome!

 

I also welcome any tips that you guys can provide me, seeing that mini in high res, I can't help but see all the splotches of misplaced paint.

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Nice conversion! Welcome to the boards :) Photos are great for showing us all of the things we wish we could improve...they're actually a great reference during the painting process for finding smudges of stray paint and other things you might overlook.

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I hated photos the first six months I painted, now I find them invaluable for evaluating where I am on a project. Both magnifying to a ridiculous level the little flaws I missed and for stepping back and getting an overall feel of how things look. I take pictures after every session and study them to plan out my next painting session.

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I'd also like to welcome you to the forum and say that you have an awesome first attempt there, love that you went with a conversion and it came together very nicely.

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 Well, the usual advice applies - thin your paints, use a brush with a good sharp point, and work on brush control - painting good clean lines and edges is the first thing you want to master as a painter since it influences everything else in the process. I find practicing painting straight lines on a piece of paper to work well.

Put a little un-thinned paint on your brush and try to paint a line that's exactly the same thickness all the way from one end to the other. It'll take some practice. The amount of pressure you apply determines how much paint the brush puts down. Once you can paint a nice even line, try to make it thinner, and thinner and thinner. Once you can draw nice clean lines, then start trying to draw curves and circles. Watch how the brush pushes the paint around on the paper and see how adjusting the pressure and angle of the brush has different effects. Then mix a few drops of paint with a single drop of water and repeat the process, then add another drop of water and repeat. Watch how thinning the paint changes both the way the paint lays down and how translucent it becomes. Take the time to learn how to push the paint around before you ever lay a brush on a mini.

 You'd be amazed how many experienced painters (especially the naturally gifted ones that picked up a brush and immediately started producing high-quality work) haven't bothered to take the time to really master the "basics". (Actually, that applies to pretty much any skill you want to learn...)

 

 When painting, once you've painted an area or object take a second to carefully look it over and check your work...

 

 - If you made a mistake somewhere, missed a spot or something doesn't look right, take the time to go back and touch it up.

 - Remember that objects are three-dimensional, and you need to paint the thin edges and bottoms of things as well as the flat surfaces.

 - If you accidentally get paint somewhere it doesn't belong, wipe it off or touch it up.

 

 (Great painters don't necessarily make fewer mistakes, they just cover them up better.)

 

 Keep a painting journal. Keep track of the colors you used in case you want to paint something else the same way in the future Practice, practice, practice.

 

 

 Oh, and good job on the conversion - people don't always remember to account for the length of the neck when placing the new head...

Edited by Mad Jack
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Thanks for the feedback, it is much appreciated. I ended up retouching this guy and I think it's a big improvement. 

 

On an unrelated note, is there a product or method that could be used to protect the paint job from chips and wear? I used this one in a game of Pathfinder the other day and I was wincing every time the GM or other players were throwing him around...

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Thanks for the feedback, it is much appreciated. I ended up retouching this guy and I think it's a big improvement. 

 

On an unrelated note, is there a product or method that could be used to protect the paint job from chips and wear? I used this one in a game of Pathfinder the other day and I was wincing every time the GM or other players were throwing him around...

Clear spray sealers/varnishes are the easiest to use. Citadel and Army Painter make some, but I just use Krylon. For extra protection, use a couple coats of high gloss (let dry between coats), then once the last coat of gloss is dry, hit it with a coat of matte to kill the shine/glare. The gloss gives is a nice "shell" to protect it. 

 

Spray from about 10-12" away, keep the can moving. Shake well and spray outdoors in fairly low humidity and not too cool temperatures (check the can). Don't let the spray "pile up" on the mini(s). A couple light mistings is what you are after. Hit the mini from several angles (rotate it on a piece of cardboard or something as you spray. Let is dry COMPLETELY before handling. Acrylic sealers dry pretty fast though (10 minutes or so). 

Edited by CashWiley
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