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I have just bought my first reapers the kobold champion and the sorcorer.  I have them both primed and ready to psint I just have NO IDEAS where to start.  I do know I start from the inner most part and work my way out so I am guessing I would do the face and skin areas first?  Any and all help would be much appericated I am really excited about finally starting this amazing hobby

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There's an order? ::o: I had no idea!

 

I guess it just depends. I suppose some people put on paint in that sort of orderly fashion, me, I don't. I usually do lighter areas last, because it's harder to cover up my mistakes when you bump light colours with dark colours. I'm not saying I'm a slob... but I am a klutz. Just ask my hubby. ^_^

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Every painter kind of has their own system, and you'll just have to discover what method works best for you. This methodology may change with time, or become more refined. 

 

For instance, I lay a color foundation on every part of the miniature; this helps me color block and look for things that might end up being 'out of place' color or temperature (of color) as I'm painting up the details. This may lead me to lay a new color foundation down on that specific area, or I may just do some washes or glazes over the area to tweak the color up or down. Other painters will literally work area by area, all skin first, all armor first, the cloak first, etc. This mean that they darken and highlight everything on a segment by segment basis. 

 

Doing eyes early is never a bad idea.

 

As a new painter, I'd encourage you to make areas that receive less light a lot darker (shading) and bring harder edges and areas that receive more light a lot lighter (highlighting). This is oftentimes neglected among newer painters; if you think you're dark or light enough, you probably aren't.

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I normally prime then paint the eyes, then the skin shadow tone (and clean up the eyes), then the skin midtone, then the skin highlights. (This works for my style of painting, but might not for yours.)

 

Next I usually figure out a basic color scheme for the figure (sometimes this is the very first thing, but not often). I commonly use a color wheel for this, but I include tonal and saturation contrast in addition to hue considerations.

 

After that, I'll try to figure out what the hardest places to reach with a brush will be and paint those first. Painting from the inside out often address this, but not always.

 

Freehand is last.

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I have a really bad habit of touching my minis as I paint them.  I work from the top down so that I don't mess up my paint work.  That said I usually block in the face and then paint the eyes because that is an easy spot to screw up and ruin a bunch of other work if I need to start over. 

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I have a really bad habit of touching my minis as I paint them.  I work from the top down so that I don't mess up my paint work.  That said I usually block in the face and then paint the eyes because that is an easy spot to screw up and ruin a bunch of other work if I need to start over. 

Ooooh, bad idea, if not for the work you're doing, for you hands and arthritis! 

 

I mount my figures on painting sticks so that I don't touch them while painting.

I made my own painter's wheel and it fits nicely in my hand with optimal control!

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The sticks I use are normally 6-8" (15-20cm) long scrap 1x2 (2.5 x 5cm) lumber. These are large enough to fit comfortably across my entire palm and allow me to rest the heel of my painting hand on the stick as well. This gives me more precise control of the brush while also keeping my hand off the figure and minimizing muscle fatigue.

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Welcome to the hobby, Brian!

 

There aren't a whole lot of rules about painting order.  For example, I usually block in the skin and work my way out, but will occasionally start with armor because I've got a bunch of other figures I'm working on that require armor at that moment.

 

Plus, I usually go back and keep adding highlights and glazes to get the look I want, and that might happen after the rest of the miniature is done.

 

There are only two rules I tend to follow:

1)  Push the contrast between highlighted and shaded areas.  Miniatures look better when the contrast is great, and it takes time to develop this skill.

2)  Use something to hold on to the figure.  Pinching the base results in fatigue.  Touching the model results in rubbed off paint.  I use precription bottles these days, but old spools (the kind that hold thread) are also used.

 

Beyond that, have fun.  It takes a bit of practice to learn how paint works, but this forum is really helpful to new painters.  Never be afraid to ask us questions!  I've been painting now for 26 years, and I'm still learning and practicing.

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