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CAV: STRIKE OPERATIONS Kickstarter


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I was going to do exactly this this morning.  If you don't mind I'll build up what you've got there and work in a calculator.  I am going to guestimate numbers for models not yet with a listed price based on mass.  That will be clearly marked in the spreadsheet.

 

As for the scale picture I promised?  It will get done very early Thursday morning (my next day off).  My day job is kicking my butt this week.

 

 

Awesome, anything I post out there like that I *want* to see improved and built up. Only reason it's not editable by anyone is so that no one messes all over it.

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Hopefully some of your CAV veterans can help a noob out...

 

I'm interested in this game system, and currently grabbed an early bird pledge to hold my spot while I figure out what the heck I would want/need.  I have never played CAV before, and only have minimal experience with tabletop mini games in general.  I've played Ogre, and I'm familiar with the mechanics of FFG's X-Wing game.  Is CAV anything like either of these?   Given that the rules are getting a reboot as part of CAV:SO, I'm hesitant to go research existing material, as I don't want to get confused with what is still relevant, and what is obsolete.

 

One thing that struck me as odd with the kickstarter is I figured there would be faction based pledge levels.  Pay $50, get a faction of your choice, pay $100, get 2 factions, etc.  Most similar game systems I've seen on kickstarter do something like this, which seems to be helpful for people unfamiliar with the system.  Right now, I have no idea how to base any purchasing decisions, other than, "The Emperor looks sweet!  I probably want one of those..."

 

Does each mech have a stat card/sheet?  Different deployment cost?  I assume there are stats for movement, armor, weapon loadout, etc?  How does one build a force? How would I decide between, say, a Ronin or a Thunderbird?

 

Hopefully the rules will show up soon and answer most of this, but it would be really helpful if there was some sort of "CAV 101 -- An intro for newbies" available to help us out.

 

If I stay in, I will need to pick up enough stuff to allow for a head to head game, so I assume that means I need enough figures for 2 factions.  Does that mean I need 2 of anything I like?  I assume I'd want some excess to give some flexibility in designing a fighting force.  Do I need terrain?  Someone on the kickstarter boards mentioned possibly using the Ogre:DE maps for CAV.  That would be awesome if that works, but I have no idea if it would...

 

So many questions...

 

 

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CAV can be played on hexes, but it's designed for open table play with terrain. Units are generally organized in groups of four, in CAV2 units were based around a specific role and one or two supporting models (ie attack with an a recon model). As units take damage they degrade across all stats. This is a streamlining mechanism. The game is more about overall tactics than tracking how many points of armor are left on the left rear torso. This allows a game with 16 CAVs per side (about four units of four) to be easily completed in about three hours, two if you don't jabber-jaw alot and have the game down.

 

I played a couple demos of CAV:SO at ReaperCon and the combat mechanic is different than in CAV2, but damage tracks work the same way and a fair part of the tone is still there, just different in how things are figured.

 

The models in the core set (without the add ons from the strech goal) are more than enough to start playing, maybe even a bit excessive for someone just starting. For a first game I usually recommend two units of four models each and build from there.

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So anybody else going to use some of their multiples from the core to "jump start" some friends in CAV? I'm thinking of keeping 2 of each and using the others to get two friends started.

 

I would very much like to do that, but I'm not sure who would get the other half of my core set. My friends have no interest in CAV. :down:

Some of them might show up at New England Paint day, or at the paint 'n takes for OGC and TotalCon.

 

 

klarg1, where are you located?

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I beefed up that spreadsheet a bit and worked in the calculator.  Here ya go:

http://sta.sh/01b56mhw8iyy

 

That spreadsheet looks good Girot.

 

 

I have never played CAV but am interested in it. Not sure I wanted to do the $100 and have that many figures. I do wanted to support this I think Bones CAV is a great idea. I guess what I am getting at is someone talk me into the $100 one. LOL. 

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So anybody else going to use some of their multiples from the core to "jump start" some friends in CAV? I'm thinking of keeping 2 of each and using the others to get two friends started.

 

I would very much like to do that, but I'm not sure who would get the other half of my core set. My friends have no interest in CAV. :down:

Some of them might show up at New England Paint day, or at the paint 'n takes for OGC and TotalCon.

 

 

klarg1, where are you located?

 

 

Answer sent via PM.

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Units are generally organized in groups of four

Hmm, thanks; although if that's true, adding one-of's to the core set seems odd.  Will we need additional copies of these figures in order to use them in games?

 

The models in the core set (without the add ons from the strech goal) are more than enough to start playing, maybe even a bit excessive for someone just starting. For a first game I usually recommend two units of four models each and build from there.

That's good to know.  I'd like to pick up additional figures now while the prices are good, but maybe it's better to just get a core set, and wait for retail on anything else.

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Units are generally organized in groups of four

Hmm, thanks; although if that's true, adding one-of's to the core set seems odd.  Will we need additional copies of these figures in order to use them in games?

 

The models in the core set (without the add ons from the strech goal) are more than enough to start playing, maybe even a bit excessive for someone just starting. For a first game I usually recommend two units of four models each and build from there.

That's good to know.  I'd like to pick up additional figures now while the prices are good, but maybe it's better to just get a core set, and wait for retail on anything else.

 

 

Groups can, and often are, a mix of different model types.  The "one-off"s will expand your available battle field roll options and give you a little variety.  You don't need four of every model.

 

Get them now before they hit retail.  You get a better price here and that money will help further expand the plastic line of products.  Down the line when you're ready to expand your force would be a good time to hit up retail.  That tactic is what made Bones I & II so successful.

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Slash,

While squads are generally 4-6 models, they are not necessarily all the same. The Core Force is set up with 4s to make it easy for new players to get the feel for it with models that represent a wide spectrum of roles and abilities. Later on you will want to specialize your Force Group to your style of play, hence why the rest are ones.

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And having played my first Warlord game this past weekend I can say reducing the number of types on model you need to track stats and abilities for can help the beginner out . . . 

 

At least it would have this beginner . . .  ::):

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