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prophetic_joe

Backdrops

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Another vote for the H18 backdrops. I bought the 6 pack, and probably will not ever need to get the other ones.

 

I don't consider myself a great painter. Mediocre at absolute best.

 

I was one of the people taking a picture of a mini that I was holding in my hand, initially, and that was good enough for me.

 

img535037349375c_zpsyodokbtz.jpg

 

Then, I switched to a one color background in a lightbox.

 

IMG_4825_zps76215528.jpg

 

The focus becomes more on the mini. Colors are more "naturally correct," and easier to change in PS if you need an adjustment.

 

From there, I moved to the H18's (and I wish I had a picture of the troll to complete the progression...)

 

DSC_3598_zps09ufby0a.jpg

 

To me, it takes it to the next level, and I am really happy with mine....though I may need to steal the idea of creating my own.... :)

 

The way I look at it is: whatever our skill level painting is, we are all artists, and seeing that we are posting pictures in a public forum where we are sharing with the entire world, wouldn't we want to showcase our talents in the highest possible manner?

 

Getting over my hump was a learning curve....but to me, was totally worth it, and I won't put another mini in Show Off without making it the best I can be.

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I've taken some of my recent photos in front of an unpowered LCD monitor. That thing drinks in light and produces a deep solid black in photos. Might not be the best thing in all cases, but works in a pinch.

 

example:

post-12393-0-42260600-1439682328.jpg
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Count me in as another happy H18 backdrop customer.

 

mini_studio_orc.jpg

 

My mini studio looks like this. I cut apart a cardboard box that was exactly the right size as a backdrop holder. I picked up those lights for general-purpose studio work, but they work great at providing nice diffuse light at the front, sides, and top of the mini. Then I get my camera up close with a macro lens. The lights are dimmable so I can do a nice long exposure time.

 

mini_studio.jpg

 

All in all very pleased with my photo set-up. Now I just need some better-painted minis! Starting tomorrow, I'll be giving my sloppily-speedpainted orc berserker 15 new friends. I'll be posting lots of pictures as I work in that WIP topic, using this mini studio.

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I don't like backdrops with pictures/tree/etc, much rather have something that is neutral and easy for the camera to focus on the figure(s) you are taking pictures of. I can see doing those fun backgrounds for fun, but not using them if you are entering things into competitions or looking for feedback as they will distract and detract from your figures.

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I wants hanger 18 backdropses. I can't decide which ones I wants. Someone tell me which colors I wants. Please and thank you.

 

If you're comfortable with controlling color temperature and exposure in your photos, any color can work. If that sounds like gibberish, I'd recommend any of the grays.  ^_^

 

I will say that using strongly colored backgrounds, if you aren't very careful, can just crush the life out of a painted miniature in a way that a neutral or desaturated color typically won't. (I've seen something similar happen with mat and frame colors and flat art far too often.)

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I wants hanger 18 backdropses. I can't decide which ones I wants. Someone tell me which colors I wants. Please and thank you.

The one I picked is called "Midnight," but "Greystone," "Slate," "Concrete," and "Smoke" all look like they'd be very nice neutral backgrounds to pick.

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I wants hanger 18 backdropses. I can't decide which ones I wants. Someone tell me which colors I wants. Please and thank you.

 

If you're comfortable with controlling color temperature and exposure in your photos, any color can work. If that sounds like gibberish, I'd recommend any of the grays. ^_^

 

I will say that using strongly colored backgrounds, if you aren't very careful, can just crush the life out of a painted miniature in a way that a neutral or desaturated color typically won't. (I've seen something similar happen with mat and frame colors and flat art far too often.)

Gray it is then. Lol. I have a confession. I take all my pics with my iPad...I can not justify spending any money on a camera to just take pictures of my cats and miniatures.

 

Thanks fellas.

 

Oh what size? Keeping in mind I have Mal coming and paint a lot of large minis.

Edited by tiniest rhombus
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I wants hanger 18 backdropses. I can't decide which ones I wants. Someone tell me which colors I wants. Please and thank you.

If you're comfortable with controlling color temperature and exposure in your photos, any color can work. If that sounds like gibberish, I'd recommend any of the grays. ^_^

 

I will say that using strongly colored backgrounds, if you aren't very careful, can just crush the life out of a painted miniature in a way that a neutral or desaturated color typically won't. (I've seen something similar happen with mat and frame colors and flat art far too often.)

Gray it is then. Lol. I have a confession. I take all my pics with my iPad...I can not justify spending any money on a camera to just take pictures of my cats and miniatures.

 

Thanks fellas.

 

I take all my pics with my iPhone... most phones and tablets have very very good cameras and more than good enough for our hobby IMO. I do have a very expensive camera we bought a few years ago, but still my iPhone has a better camera than that now, which is sad.

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As Doug said, especially if you're using it for various paint schemes, a grey is best for neutrality.

 

Red might make that blue or green dragon pop, but that poor knight with the awesome red NMM is going to disappear. Also, strong colors will cause color shifting that is hard, and sometimes impossible, to correct. Throw in a mix of light sources and your awesome mini just won't look right.

 

Too dark, and the dark colors fade into the background, like a dark-haired person shot inside with a flash... their face ends up floating in blackness (Texas Gov. Anne Richards was soooooo hard to photograph because she was so pale).

 

Too light, and you get a glare (which is why I'm not a huge fan of stark-white-shot-in-a-lightbox-pictures. You don't want people squinting to see your mini.

 

Photographic grey cards, which are used to balance color, are set to 18% grey iirc. It's been about 20 years since I was elbow deep in bleach fix.

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Thanks Ary.

 

Yeah, my iPad actually takes nice clear pics. But it's so hard to get the colors to show properly. Which I figure is a combo of lighting and background. It's very frustrating. Once I get the background, I'll take a look at my lighting situation.

 

Suggestion on the size I should get? With several large dragons coming, I was thinking the large. At that price point I want to be sure I need it.

 

The 23x33 is the one I'm thinking.

Edited by tiniest rhombus
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I would go for the largest you can, this makes it more versatile for all figures and dioramas. It's very frustrating to need just one more inch on either side of the frame.

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I typically use 107" wide by 36' long.

 

:devil:

 

(Really. That's the size that the large Savage paper rolls come in.)

 

More seriously, backdrops work better when they're farther away, because you don't have to worry as much about shadows of the figure on the backdrop. Also, a larger backdrop gives you more choices about shooting angle without having to move the figure (which can be important if you want consistent lighting ... or if you're lazy like me.  ^_^ ) Also, if you want a seamless background, you'll want a sheet large enough to curve under the base of the figure.

 

Small is nice if you only have a small space, but if you have the space, large is nearly always better.

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