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Do adventurers always die at a doorway?


Werkrobotwerk
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I would have written a plaque on the side of the door.  "Free Ale and Wenches Inside!"   :devil:

 

 

Our DM liked the trap so much that he told us he was gonna be using it in his homebrew later that week!  It did like 5 points of damage a round and petrified on failed saves.  The door boss took us like 8-10 rounds to beat...

Edited by Mr Melons
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Way back in the day, when I was running miniatures-based fantasy dungeon games a lot (Advanced HeroQuest, Warhammer Quest, hybrids of the two, etc.), I would run into problems with doorways in that most encounters started at doorways, and often with the heroes going through and THEN discovering what monsters were on the other side, sometimes with the party split through the doorway and one or two heroes up front surrounded by as many monsters as could cram around them.

 

It worked a bit better for the heroes when they learned to make "strategic retreats" in such situations (when not forced by such things as a trap door that slams down a portcullis once they're through to seal them in or some-such), and then they could use the bottleneck created by a doorway to their distinct advantage.

 

This phenomenon was somewhat lessened when I used a lot more double-wide doors (usually courtesy of Warhammer Quest) in my games, rather than the single-square doors I previously assumed by default.

(In any case, if a dungeon has rat ogres and other large beasties as potential encounters, it really DOES need at least a few larger doorways, or one might wonder how in the world those critters get into the dungeon in the first place.)

As a player in such games, I do recall that the greatest concentration of traps in at least one campaign seemed to involve doors or chests -- door traps being slightly more frequent, but chest traps typically being more deadly (e.g., EXPLOSIONS and other things to destroy the loot in the process -- take THAT, adventurers!).  I haven't played in enough games, however, to determine whether that was just due to the imagination of one GM, or if there's a general tendency to make door-traps a common feature.  

I think it at least makes a certain sense from a security perspective that in some sort of a dungeon complex, traps might be focused on "security" points such as doors and chests (presumably bypassed by having the correct key, or the good sense never to open Chest X or Door Y, because it's only meant to be there as thief bait).  It's probably a lot easier for someone who's in the know to recall never to touch that door or that chest, versus some random nondescript spot in the floor in the middle of a heavily-used corridor.  (Le oops!  *KACHANG!*  *SPLAT!*  Lost another orc minion!  Send the gelatinous cube through to clean up, and then have the goblins reset the trap!)

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The closest I've come to a door killing someone was when my rouge declared a door she'd inspected to be trapped. Before she could proceed with removing the trap, a (very inexperienced) fighter insisted on opening the door. Like, really, really insisted. We all stood back a good ways while he did so. Fortunately for him, it was just sleep poison. We left him there while it wore off.

 

They let me remove the next trap.

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