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Pewter Trade-In Q's


Aard_Rinn
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@pegazus - but to get an accurate weight, not just a greater/lesser measurement, you'd need enough metal forscales to balance the scales, and maybe an incremental piece, as well... hm... I wonder how many of the cats from the crazy cat lady are in an ounce? They might be a good fraction...  (Of course, if we are weighing, the cheaty option is to simply google the weights of coins and use those... but that's cheaty!)

 

Nah, use the moment. Of course, that would require that you know the mass of the ruler per inch, since that would be a significant part of the moment. (Of course, if you knew the mass of the ruler, you wouldn't need Sir Forscale, either.)

 

ETA: Now that I think about it, with the mass of Sir Forscale, you could derive the mass per inch of the ruler. 

Edited by Doug Sundseth
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@Doug - only if the ruler was also pewter, though; wood has a different mass/volume ratio, remember - it's not a like substance... And you'd have to resolve mass volumetricly either way. Might as well cut out the middleman.

 

@ReaperBryan - SCALES ARE FOR THE WEAK! ARE WE NOT SCIENTISTS? HAVE WE NO SHAME?! Also, this is way easier than buying a scale. I have graduated flasks. I don't have a car. Or money! That one's your fault, by the way... stupid sexy Sophies...

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@Doug - only if the ruler was also pewter, though; wood has a different mass/volume ratio, remember - it's not a like substance... And you'd have to resolve mass volumetricly either way. Might as well cut out the middleman.

 

Nope:

  1. Determine a known mass. Here, that would be Sir Forscale at .5 oz. mass, though a more-precise mass would be useful.
  2. Place the known mass on the ruler and balance the ruler on a fulcrum.
  3. Measure the distance from the fulcrum to the mass. This will give you the moment from the mass.
  4. Find the position of the fulcrum under the ruler. This will allow you to find the ratio of moments from the left and right half of the ruler.
  5. Find the excess moment from the ratio. This will equal the moment from the mass.
  6. Determine the mass per length for the ruler using algebra.
  7. Once you know the mass of the ruler, you can use that to determine any other mass balanced on the ruler.

This method does not depend on the material of the ruler, though it does assume that the ruler composition is uniform.

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Aw... I missed all the fun engineering talk. In my defense, I was in the EngineerCave saving Gotham City from the dastardly Miss Match Parts.

 

Ok, ok. Was in the cubical planning tolerance allocations. Same thing.

 

Course, put two fulcrums under the ruler on a level surface and slide them together slowly. When they meet, you'll know the Center of Gravity (thank you Mr Wizard). Then you can do all kinds of magic with Sir Forscale.

 

Magic. Not maths. Magikeses.

 

And while writing this, had the thought pop into my head of going to Reaper HQ during ReaperCon and weighing all the available Sir Forscale figures available in order to get a statistical variance of his weight defined. I'll have to force myself NOT to do that now.

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Some figures are deceptively heavy for their size, while others are the opposite. Cloaks, in particular, tend to really jack with the weight of a figure vs. eyeballing them.

 

~v

Which is why I keep suggesting a scale, but nobody is listening to me.

 

I'm not used to not being listened to on here... It's unnatural.

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Some figures are deceptively heavy for their size, while others are the opposite. Cloaks, in particular, tend to really jack with the weight of a figure vs. eyeballing them.

 

~v

Which is why I keep suggesting a scale, but nobody is listening to me.

 

I'm not used to not being listened to on here... It's unnatural.

 

Are you sure? I've always thought it was the other way until the bat comes out. Guess you shouldn't have handed out your bat temporarily to see what we would do with it. :P

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Some figures are deceptively heavy for their size, while others are the opposite. Cloaks, in particular, tend to really jack with the weight of a figure vs. eyeballing them.

 

~v

Well, yes - to the eye. That's what displacement's for! It doesn't get fooled by wiggy bits like that!

 

 

 

Which is why I keep suggesting a scale, but nobody is listening to me.

 

I'm not used to not being listened to on here... It's unnatural.

 

Go to sleep, Bryan. We'll be done here eventually. :D

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@ReaperBryan - SCALES ARE FOR THE WEAK! ARE WE NOT SCIENTISTS? HAVE WE NO SHAME?! Also, this is way easier than buying a scale. I have graduated flasks. I don't have a car. Or money! That one's your fault, by the way... stupid sexy Sophies...

Does walking distance college campus post office have a scale?

 

 

 

Some figures are deceptively heavy for their size, while others are the opposite. Cloaks, in particular, tend to really jack with the weight of a figure vs. eyeballing them.

 

~v

Which is why I keep suggesting a scale, but nobody is listening to me.

 

I'm not used to not being listened to on here... It's unnatural.

Maybe the natives listen harder the less sense you make..? :upside:

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