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As discussed in the Big-Mouthed, Putty Catcher thread, this thread will be a sculpt-along-with-me tutorial during which I'll walk you through the process of making a BMPC of your own.    Why the BMP

Step 1: Building the Armature   The first and arguably most important step of any sculpt is to build the armature.  Normally, this process would start with reference material and a template to get t

Step 2: Sculpting the Rock Base   Typically, if a critter is standing on the ground, I sculpt it first and add the base after the fact; however, in this case, the base is necessary to be there befor

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TS, any recommendations on brands, or is 'greenstuff is greenstuff,' as it were?

 

There is only one Green Stuff, AFAIK.  It is called Keadatite Putty, Bule/Yellow.  It is made by Polymeric Systems Inc.  They sell it to a lot of other people who relabel/repackage it for resale (like GW who charges WAY too much for it).

 

The best value is to get it in the tube.  First, the two parts are fully separate and you won't have chunky curing issues at the spot where the two parts touch in the tape versions.  Second, it is a lot more putty in the tube than in the tape, so you get more for your money.

 

Cheapest I can find online right now is on ebay. $12.95 is a good price for one tube, not buying in bulk.

 

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Edited by Qwyksilver
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A little bit on mixing the putty.  I notice that Polymeric Systems recommends mixing the GS in 1 part blue to 1.5 parts yellow.  I hadn't noted that before.  I tend to mix them nearly 1 for 1, maybe a bit more yellow than blue.  Adding more yellow makes the mix a bit mushier and is good for faces and the like. I notice that Derek's models are a brighter green than mine, so I suspect he's using more yellow.  I'll likely play with a richer yellow mix next time and see what I think of it.

 

Play with your ratios and find one that you like. It may be science, but it is still art.

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Also, consider ProCreate.  I haven't tried it (because I have 24 tubes of GS at home; I bought a case), but I know a lot of people like it better than GS, like Patrick Keith. I've been meaning to pick up a pack of it and see what I think of it, but, like I said, I have a LOT of GS to work through first.

 

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Oh, and for other things you'll likely see me use (but you don't necessarily need:
 
- Apoxie Sculpt
- Clay Shapers (I'm actually ordering this set right now because mine are mediums and I want these firm ones)
- Dental Spatula Sculpting Tool (I have this set: SE DD312 12-Piece Stainless Steel Wax Carvers available on Amazon, but only ever use the one on the far right)
- #11 Feather Scalpel Blades (You can get by with X-Acto blades at first, but if you get into it, get scalpel blades as they are much sharper and can do a lot more; they are better for cleaning Bones too.)

 

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Edited by Qwyksilver
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How do you feel about Fimo and Beesputty? I'm interested because the bake hard nature of those putties mean that you can continue to revisit something over and over until you think it looks right.  Which appeals to me because that is how I paint.

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I took a class by Gene on using FIMO classic, so I know how to use it, I just don't.  It has special issues (like not sticking to wire; you need to coat the wire with wet GS first and then add the FIMO to the GS coating it. When the GS cures the Fimo is now stuck).  I have nothing personally against polymer clays, I just tend to like the additive/engineering nature of the epoxies better, so it is what I am most comfortable with.  Everything I do in this tutorial, you should be able to do using polymer clay, but my instructions, breaks, etc... will be tailored toward epoxy putties as that is what I use.

 

So essentially the process will be different.  If I were using FIMO, I'd start by conditioning it, then coat the armature in a thin layer of GS, then a layer of FIMO over the wet GS.  Let the GS cure, then go on to make the rock base from more FIMO.

 

If you want to use polymer clay, you might want to wait until the whole tutorial is done as it is being designed around the cure nature of epoxy, but you will want to approach it differently using FIMO (like doing the eyeball first so you can bake harden it, then come back and do the rest, leaving it all soft until the end).

 

Also tool movement will be different with polymer clay, you tend to pat a lot more than stroke with FIMO.

Edited by TaleSpinner
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I'm going to try this with GS first.  I was just curious what you thought.  That is some really good info.  I did not know Fimo had trouble sticking to wire.  I may try two of these critters one following along with GS and another in Polymer clay when we are done.

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Interesting to see how something that seems to have originated as a use for excess bits of epoxy putty that was already mixed but unused in a project has evolved into a project of its' own.       The polymer clays don't really seem like they'd need a BMPC thing, but... the creature created is itself pretty neat, so I can understand the desire to make something like it.

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Interesting to see how something that seems to have originated as a use for excess bits of epoxy putty that was already mixed but unused in a project has evolved into a project of its' own.       The polymer clays don't really seem like they'd need a BMPC thing, but... the creature created is itself pretty neat, so I can understand the desire to make something like it.

 

:lol: True.

 

The point of the tutorial though is that the BMPCs are simple enough that new sculptors can learn from creating one without having to worry about real-world anatomy.  So many times I see new sculptors struggle by jumping straight into sculpting people or animals when they really need to be focusing on techniques.  I thought that these little critters would be a good way to get that technique practice and yet end up with something neat to show for it, that's all.

 

You are right though, polymer clays don't need putty catchers as there is no excess putty.

 

 

 

Oh, and I was sculpting last night and had time left over to do another series of steps for this.  I should be able to post the next steps this weekend.

Edited by TaleSpinner
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