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As discussed in the Big-Mouthed, Putty Catcher thread, this thread will be a sculpt-along-with-me tutorial during which I'll walk you through the process of making a BMPC of your own.    Why the BMP

Step 1: Building the Armature   The first and arguably most important step of any sculpt is to build the armature.  Normally, this process would start with reference material and a template to get t

Step 2: Sculpting the Rock Base   Typically, if a critter is standing on the ground, I sculpt it first and add the base after the fact; however, in this case, the base is necessary to be there befor

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Step 3: Sculpting the Eyeball

 

1. Mix a wad of putty and take a chunk roughly the size you want the eyeball to be.

 

post-140-0-28523300-1413603359.gif

 

 

2. Roll it in your palm until you have a smooth ball.

 

Now you have a choice to make:

 

- You can stop here, allow the ball to cure, then drill a hole in it, and glue it onto the wire later using some fresh putty, or...

- Continue with the following steps to put the ball on while uncured. 

 

3. Push the ball onto the end of the wire.

 

4. Stretch and adhere the back of the ball onto the wire, working the tool all the way around the ball and the wire.

 

5. Use your finger tip, lubricated with a bit of Vaseline, to smooth the finger prints out of the ball.

 

6. Use a lubricated, cupped clay shaper to refine and round the ball and smooth the back. (This step is more difficult with a metal tool, but possible.)

 

 

 

Step 4: Making the Tentacles

 

This step can be done while the eyeball is still soft as they do not impact each other.

 

1. Roll out a tapered putty "snake".  It should form a point.

 

post-140-0-71064800-1413603416.gif

 

 

2. Cut it with your metal tool and apply it to the armature where it meets the rock.

 

3. Wind the tentacle around the rock in the position you want it, then press it lightly down to the rock.  Ensure that you keep it round.

 

4. At the end of the tentacle, press a bit of the tip flat into the rock, firmly adhering it.  Texture that part to look like the rock and touch-up the tentacle tip.

 

5. Repeat steps 1 through 4 for the other tentacles.

 

6. Add a texture to the tentacles. 

 

I'm doing a ropey look on mine, running fine lines down the length to the tentacles.  Feel free to copy mine or come up with your own texture.  Remember to use a very light touch when texturing so as not to deform the tentacles. Note that texturing is tedious and will take time to do it right; don't rush. This step is best done after the putty has set up for 20 to 30 minutes after mixing.

 

post-140-0-30282900-1413603420.gif

 

 

 

 

Here are a couple others I am working on.  On one, I have added an armature for a tentacle to go on so I can show you how to create a supported tentacle.  It will be holding a wooden club.  The other is clinging to a broken tree, because I needed to make one on a stick. ::D:

 

post-140-0-68826600-1413603411.gif

 

 

Have fun!

 

Andy

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I wish I could say that I'm doing the sculpt along with you guys, but RAC is just around the corner and I want to have an entry for the paint contest. So I am cramming instead. Although....   I am doing a conversion with a fair amount of sculpting for the entry. When RAC is over I'll share that project and play catchup as fast as I can.

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This is awesome.

 

The only problem I have with the animated GIFs is that I had intended to take this thread and do some copy and paste to a nice word document I could print out as a reference. For some reason, animated GIFs just don't seem to work when printed to paper. I can't figure out why for the life of me, you'd think as a tech guy, I'd be able to figure that out.  :devil:

 

Seriously, I'll just work around it by using my tablet at my workbench - probably a better solution anyway.

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This is awesome.

 

The only problem I have with the animated GIFs is that I had intended to take this thread and do some copy and paste to a nice word document I could print out as a reference. For some reason, animated GIFs just don't seem to work when printed to paper. I can't figure out why for the life of me, you'd think as a tech guy, I'd be able to figure that out.  :devil:

 

Seriously, I'll just work around it by using my tablet at my workbench - probably a better solution anyway.

Well obviously the problem is a lack of processing power in your paper, it can't handle the complex calculations of the animation.

 

You could always capture each frame of the animation and put them in sequence in the word document so it's a progression of individual images.   But that's far more work and hassle than using the tablet at the workbench.   So you solution is probably best.    Tablet=Paper with more processing power.  Problem solved!

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Haven't had time to pull this into PDF yet.  Got into a sculpting furor last night and finished the crocodile I was working on.

 

When I do get this put together, what is the best way to share said PDF with you all?  Do I need to get a dropbox set up or something?

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