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As discussed in the Big-Mouthed, Putty Catcher thread, this thread will be a sculpt-along-with-me tutorial during which I'll walk you through the process of making a BMPC of your own.    Why the BMP

Step 1: Building the Armature   The first and arguably most important step of any sculpt is to build the armature.  Normally, this process would start with reference material and a template to get t

Step 2: Sculpting the Rock Base   Typically, if a critter is standing on the ground, I sculpt it first and add the base after the fact; however, in this case, the base is necessary to be there befor

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Size 0 cupped clay shaper sees the most use in my arsenal of that which I cannot make myself, followed closely by the pointed and the flat.  Usually, the three come together in a set with two others I don't use.

 

 

In truth, I do 90% of the work with 4 tools:

 

- My fingers

- Metal dental spatula (though many other metal bladed, but not sharp, tools would work; I know some who use a dulled Exacto knife for this).  I use this for shaping, rough layout, and blending,

- Cupped (0) clay shaper

- Fine-pointed, leaf blade I made myself.  This guy does almost all of my detail work save for a few applications where a pin tip is needed.

Going to pull the trigger, 5 pack of shapers in size 0, But soft, firm, or extra firm?

I am just starting out with doing more than filling gaps and using it as a base material, so I am thinking Firm as a middle of the road option?

 

Thanks again!

8)

George

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Going to pull the trigger, 5 pack of shapers in size 0, But soft, firm, or extra firm?

I am just starting out with doing more than filling gaps and using it as a base material, so I am thinking Firm as a middle of the road option?

 

Thanks again!

8)

George

 

 

I have Clay/ColorShaper tools in all three hardnesses. Softs are more suited as a squeegee when working on waterclor paper or other delicate surfaces, but I've used them also for gently smoothing well-lubricated Magic Sculpt putty.

I find the extra-firm a bit too firm for small sculpting, but that may just be a matter of taste. I think they're intended for pottery and plasticine clays.

The firm seems to handle the best for me, but again that may be a matter of taste. When I need a harder tool I go for my dental picks. The extra-firm might work better for you.

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Size 0 cupped clay shaper sees the most use in my arsenal of that which I cannot make myself, followed closely by the pointed and the flat.  Usually, the three come together in a set with two others I don't use.

 

 

In truth, I do 90% of the work with 4 tools:

 

- My fingers

- Metal dental spatula (though many other metal bladed, but not sharp, tools would work; I know some who use a dulled Exacto knife for this).  I use this for shaping, rough layout, and blending,

- Cupped (0) clay shaper

- Fine-pointed, leaf blade I made myself.  This guy does almost all of my detail work save for a few applications where a pin tip is needed.

Going to pull the trigger, 5 pack of shapers in size 0, But soft, firm, or extra firm?

I am just starting out with doing more than filling gaps and using it as a base material, so I am thinking Firm as a middle of the road option?

 

Thanks again!

8)

George

 

My tools are pretty close to Talespinner's (my results, on the other hand... ;) ), only I prefer a flat chisel clay shaper as my go-to.

 

I personally prefer extra firm; a lighter touch can compensate for stiffer tools, but you'll wish you had those stiffer tools when trying to push hardening putty.

 

Procreate, which is the putty I like most, is noticeably stiffer than GS, so that's probably a major factor in my choice.

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  • 3 weeks later...

My clay shapers came in the other day, I ordered extra firm (Thanks again guys!)

 

I wonder what soft is like, as I was very surprised at how 'soft' the 'Extra Firm' is! I kept checking the handles to see if maybe I got the wrong things!

 

Used the chisel point to work some GS into the gaps around the Angel of Death's wings...

 

George

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My clay shapers came in the other day, I ordered extra firm (Thanks again guys!)

 

I wonder what soft is like, as I was very surprised at how 'soft' the 'Extra Firm' is! I kept checking the handles to see if maybe I got the wrong things!

 

Used the chisel point to work some GS into the gaps around the Angel of Death's wings...

 

George

 

The soft Colour Shapers are very squishy. Not much good for sculpting but might be good for polishing at certain stages, such as when your putty is still soft and you're trying to blend away tool marks.

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  • 4 weeks later...
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GUYS GUYS GUYS I'M SUPER EXCITED!!!

 

I made my very first BMPC, squee!!! He turned out decently, but my favorite part was actually a complete accident. I was having a ton of trouble getting the roll of putty for the top lip to stick to the body (due to vaseline and stiffening putty), so I stabbed it a couple of times in frustration. Which made him look like he had little nose holes, and, given the sort of flat shape of the roll, gave me the idea of:

 

Duck-billed big mouth putty catcher!!!! :bday:

 

P1070695.JPG

 

P1070685.JPG

 

P1070686.JPG

 

P1070690.JPG

 

I had originally intended him to be fierce and threatening, and instead he turned out cute and smiley. Go figure. :lol:

 

I'll be doing WIP/Show-off threads for this little guy where I'll go into detail, but the primary issues I kept running into were:

 

1) Since everything had vaseline on it, new bits of putty DID NOT want to stick onto the figure (the eyelids were the worst!)

2) Smoothing between pieces of putty without squashing previous work was quite difficult (and issue #1 did not help matters)

3) The sculpt twisting on the pin was annoying

4) I don't think I'm pushing hard enough; I think I keep subconsciously expecting the GS to act like ceramics clay (which I'm used to), and the GS is far more firm and elastic-y than that

5) Rocks are hard XD

6) I imagine having the proper tools would help with a lot of these problems

 

Overall, I'm pretty happy with this little guy for my first time seriously sculpting anything with GS! ::): I'm looking forward to painting him!

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

Edited by OneBoot
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GUYS GUYS GUYS I'M SUPER EXCITED!!!

 

I made my very first BMPC, squee!!! He turned out decently, but my favorite part was actually a complete accident. I was having a ton of trouble getting the roll of putty for the top lip to stick to the body (due to vaseline and stiffening putty), so I stabbed it a couple of times in frustration. Which made him look like he had little nose holes, and, given the sort of flat shape of the roll, gave me the idea of:

 

Duck-billed big mouth putty catcher!!!! :bday:

 

P1070695.JPG

 

P1070685.JPG

 

P1070686.JPG

 

P1070690.JPG

 

I had originally intended him to be fierce and threatening, and instead he turned out cute and smiley. Go figure. :lol:

 

I'll be doing WIP/Show-off threads for this little guy where I'll go into detail, but the primary issues I kept running into were:

 

1) Since everything had vaseline on it, new bits of putty DID NOT want to stick onto the figure (the eyelids were the worst!)

2) Smoothing between pieces of putty without squashing previous work was quite difficult (and issue #1 did not help matters)

3) The sculpt twisting on the pin was annoying

4) I don't think I'm pushing hard enough; I think I keep subconsciously expecting the GS to act like ceramics clay (which I'm used to), and the GS is far more firm and elastic-y than that

5) Rocks are hard XD

6) I imagine having the proper tools would help with a lot of these problems

 

Overall, I'm pretty happy with this little guy for my first time seriously sculpting anything with GS! ::): I'm looking forward to painting him!

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

 

Awesome, it's cute!  

 

A couple points on  your points:

 

1.  You need to ensure that you have vaseline on your fingers when mixing the putty.  This will incorporate the vaseline into the putty and it will then stick to putty with vaseline on it.

2.  Yeah, that takes practice and experience.  One thing to help is to lay everything you are going to do in a session down first, then rough in the shapes you want, then smooth everything together, then add details, then let it cure.

3. Rough up the pin a bit with sandpaper so the putty sticks to it better.  You can also underpin everything with a thin layer of putty on the pin first, let it cure, and then everything will stick better (see #1 answer).

4. It depends on what you are trying to do. Shaping, forming, and blending can take considerable pressure, but not a lot.  Detail work takes almost none.  If your putty is old though, it could be too stiff to work with.

5. Got nothing for you there.  It is where I started so I do them reflexively now without thinking.

6. Yes, yes they do, especially when blending new putty onto existing putty, a burnisher really helps.

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