Jump to content
  • Optionally enter a message with your report.

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Al Capwn
      I don't have a blog, and I am not veteran or post enough content to justify making one - so while these musing may be better served in that format, I will leave it here for anyone who is interested to view and chime in. It just so happens that my best friend happens to work at Rustoleum as a colorist; so lately I have been picking his brain since he has an extensive knowledge about pigments, paint make up, and the chemical intricacies therein.
       
      As I have delved further and further into the hobby, I have been looking more into the deep subjects of color theory and how paint is made/composed. After reading James Gurney's Color and Light, as well as Michael Wilcox's Blue & Yellow Don't Make Green, I was really intrigued about what exactly paint is and how exactly color interactions work. Now I am guilty as the next person in owning WAY too many paints - not to say anything about minis!
       
      While color mixing may seem irrelevant to some, understanding how paints function can help even those of us who own a complete gamut of convenience mixed colors. This post is about exploring more of the technical and "scientific" aspects of paint and color theory to hopefully assist others in understanding the what and why of paint.
       
      Rethinking Paint Colors - Subtractive Color:
      Up until recently, I have always viewed the primary colors as Yellow, Red and Blue, and with those you can mix secondary colors; Green, Orange, and Purple. While this is technically true after a fashion, the difficulty lies with pigments themselves. Pigments do not actually *contain* color. Instead, they absorb most of the light spectrum *except* a specific wavelength of color. As Michael Wilcox states, "Of all the pigments available to the painter, none can be described as pure in hue. There is simply no such thing as a pure red, yellow or blue paint." That means chemically, there isn't a paint pigment out there that returns a pure Red - unlike in say digital art where a specifically purely calibrated hue can be made, paint is limited by the properties of the physical pigments themselves.
       
      As Michael Wilcox theorizes with a colour bias wheel (bottom-right), primary pigments almost certainly lean towards secondaries. This follows the concept of the Munsell Wheel (bottom-left). You may have heard of a split-complimentary color palette, and this is the reason why. Artistically, these have been described as "Warm" and "Cool" versions of the primaries, but scientifically, they are colors that absorb or reflect more of a particular wavelength. There are Violet-Reds (Cool Reds, often called "Crimson") and Orange-Reds (or Warm Reds, that lean more towards Orange), Violet-Blues and Green-Blues, and Orange-Yellows and Green-Yellows.
       

       
      One the concepts to understand when mixing paints is that you are not creating a color, but rather you are effectively destroying colors and what remains is what is returned to the eye. Referencing the above color bias wheel, if you were to mix a Violet-Blue and a Violet-Red together, both containing pigment(s) that return a great deal of Violet wavelength, the little remaining Blue/Orange and Red/Green wavelengths in each pigment would cancel each other out, leaving the Violet behind.  This would yield a more saturated or more pure hue of Violet. Conversely, mixing a Green-Blue and a Orange-Red ("Warm" Red) would be a very desaturated Violet, with more of a gray tone.
       
      Keep in mind that this doesn't make a color "bad"; desatured tones by including more complimentary colors is a very useful tool! In fact, for making shadows, using a great deal of complimentary colors to desaturate is a great technique. The problem is when these colors come about unexpectedly; after all, you can have a very "intense" Red and a very "intense" Blue, but mixing them may not produce a very intense Violet if they are "moving away" from each other.
       
      Now that is all being said, it is time to forget it...sort of. RGB is based upon the concept of Additive Mixing, or how colored light interacts. With additive mixing, fully saturated Red/Green/Blue light will produce White light. However, in paint pigments, it should be pretty obvious that mixing pigment primaries of Red/Yellow (or Green)/Blue together will not yield White. This is due to Subtractive Mixing, where pigments effectively destroy each other ala Thunderdome in Mad Max, and only the survivors reflect light back.
       
      A more modern approach to color theory and pigments is CMYK or Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and "Key" (or commonly known, Black). Adding these colors into the standard primaries gives us the "Yurmby" wheel. If you have looked at a color printer, for example, the colors used are NOT Blue/Red/Yellow, but rather Cyan/Magenta/Yellow. This is because due to the subtractive nature of pigment/ink mixing. These colors present a larger printable gamut (i.e. range) of color; for example, without White, it is difficult to produce a Pink tone with Red vs Magenta. A thin Magenta will read more Pink than a thin Red.
       
      Printers do not use White ink and instead leverage the paper for white, effectively printers are printing in an underpainting style. However, we as artists DO use White pigments and this makes things a bit more complicated as we do work with Tints (White) and Shades (Black).
       

       
      Like most science, the direct answer regarding an accurate color wheel is: it is complicated. For observable light, there is a bit more consistency and repeatability. However, when working with "tiny wavelength absorbing/reflecting mirrors" of pigments, things become a bit more complex. Additionally, there are other aspects that that go beyond the basics, such as the effect of specular and perception of color. It gets really heady when you start dipping into Kubelka-Monk Theory and K/S.
       
      Paint Composition:
      Most paint is made up of 3 parts:
      Pigment - particles that absorb and reflect certain wavelengths of light.
      Binder - The 'medium' or 'glue' which holds the pigment in suspension and forms a film. For acrylic paint, this is the actual acrylic part.
      Solvent - The liquid that allows paint to be viscous; as it dries, it allows the binder and pigment to harden forming the film. For acrylic paint, the solvent is water.
       
      Adjusting the ratios of these can have some interesting, and sometimes disastrous effects in terms of the stability of the paint. For example, introducing too much solvent, and the binder and pigment lattice structure can break apart. This can cause "coffee staining" or splotchy spots where the bonds pull apart, leaving areas without a film at all.
       
      More to come in future edits.
       
    • By stormbreach
      Hello all.  Today I just finished this Shambling Mound from Nolzur's Marvelous Miniatures.  I decided to do it just like a tutorial I saw on Mini Junkies, so I'm not even sure how much credit I can claim for him .  Basically it's heavily drybrushed with white and then entirely inked.  I used Vallejo Game Inks and this was my first time trying them.  There are some imperfections and I wish some aspects had turned out different but I'm happy enough with him.  I didn't have enough guts to put grass and flock directly on him like I would have liked but I don't think any of the stuff I have would have looked right.  As it is the grass and flock on the base basically disappears because it blends with the greens on him.  Hope you enjoy him!





    • By Evilhalfling
      77451
      77153
      77449
      77450
       
      Thief : Blue Ink base + black ink to show details  (least happy) 
      Cleric : angelic ghost or spiritual weapon spell.  Yellow ink + TMM 
      Ranger: painted by minispawn.  ill take it. Makes a great ghost 
      Wizard: nulin Oil + higlights of green ink  (fav) 
      Fighter: I only painted the base. (represents an invisible PC pretty well.) 
       
      I should talk to @Doug Sundseth about this again, since he is teaching a class on it, probably today.  Not sure im happy with the set. 
       

    • By Maledrakh
      WizKids make both Nolur's Marvelous and Pathfinder Deep Cuts miniatures, both similar in style, scale and the primer. These, however, were clear transparent with just their integral bases primed light grey.

       
      I started by painting them all over with Army painter Anti-Shine Matte varnish. Then I gave them a wash of Citadel Casandora Yellow shade.
      When dry I then drybrushed carefully, using only "twelve to six"-strokes (think of a clock, the strokes going straight downward) with a pinkish red, a dark reddish brown and black.
      As these paints were both thin and carefully applied, the effect is much like a tasty gummy bear.
      Some dark blue in the eye cavities, followed by Army Painter Crystal Blue and Reaper Copper Verdigris on the eyeballs to make that demonic glow.
      The collars were painted with scale color Black Metal, followed by Army Painter Alien Purple and Scalecolor Deep Blue, topped with some more Black Metal.
      Inside the open mouth I painted some Citadel Yriel Yellow and Reaper Pure White.
       

      Hell Hounds are really big dogs!
      I did the bases with black flock directly beneath the hounds, with a crescent of my normal green flockmix to the front. I dabbed some yellow and orange paint along the edges to hint at burning grass. The bases themselves are 3D-printed 30mm x 45mm lipped ovals.
       
      72581 Hell Hounds
      Pathfinder Deep Cuts by WizKids
      Transparent PVC
      30x45mm bases
  • Who's Online   6 Members, 0 Anonymous, 26 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...