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How do you feel about mixing NMM and Metallics


redpiano
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Perhaps I have bad taste, but a final light dot of silver or white metallic medium for a NMM blend looks fine to me, enhancing the spot like no mere white paint would be able to do.

 

I know it is not the original question, but it goes for the argument that both paints can be used (like in the link provided by junex).

 

I think actually this is different than what he is proposing.  I think he is proposing one area to be painted purely nmm and another painted purely in shaded metallics. 

 

I've never tried putting a dot of metallic medium on the highest spots of nmm but I can see that working if its done right.  Just enough to add a glint but tiny.  not my thing though.

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I think mixing the two on the same piece would lessen the effect of both. The metallic will look shoddy next to the nmm, and the nmm will look weird against the metallic. What it will do is serve to confuse and distract the viewer, so it's probably not the end result people are looking to present with their work.

 

That said, to some extent we're trying to decipher the idea in your head with what we ourselves know, and our vision may be completely different from what you think it will look like. In which case my advice would be to try it out and see if you can prove the concept. If it works, you've hit on something very interesting. If it doesn't work, then you also have an answer.

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It could work, if what you're talking about is Buglips' interpretation, if you're doing mixed metal.

 

Lets take a scifi figure (like a storm trooper) you could paint the armor in NMM to show it's some fancy composite while paint the gun in Metalics. That could come off.

 

But, as has been mentioned, just go for it if you want. unless you're painting up a competition piece the only person that matters is you--doesn't matter if we think it will work.

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I think it comes down to the sheen factor.  If you're trying to emulate a shiny plastic or enamel you might need to use gloss varnish on those parts to get the right feel.  Attempting to replicate this with NMM techniques while allowing the higher refractive index on metal items is going to just feel off the minute you change your perspective the tiniest amount. 

 

It might be helpful to look at how computer graphics are done, there's a sliding scale for how smooth objects are and therefore how the light reflects off of it.  Think of the difference between honed and polished granite. Computers have the advantage of being able to compensate for changing camera angles, but a painted mini is in a fixed state forever.  So mixing NMM and regular metal is going to look like you have a fixed and moving point of view at the same time.  I think my brain would explode looking at it for long.

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It could work, if what you're talking about is Buglips' interpretation, if you're doing mixed metal.

 

Lets take a scifi figure (like a storm trooper) you could paint the armor in NMM to show it's some fancy composite while paint the gun in Metalics. That could come off.

 

But, as has been mentioned, just go for it if you want. unless you're painting up a competition piece the only person that matters is you--doesn't matter if we think it will work.

 

Your storm trooper example is more what I had in mind, I was just thinking about this and figured I'd pose the question to all of you. I'm painting a White Knight from Kingdom Death for a commission and while I was working on the gold NMM I was just thinking how it might look with metallic gold because the armor is painted more like a storm trooper, like a metallic white, not so much an actual steel or something. I did try it out and I think the gold looked fine, sorry I didn't snap a picture, but it looked alright. I did apply silver metallics to the sword though and that looked ridiculous in conjunction with the NMM white armor.

 

Here is another model I tried it on, I don't really like how the model itself turned out but it's not because of the NMM/Metallic mix. While I'm at it, I'd love some criticism on this paint job.

 

post-12995-0-97664700-1415215537_thumb.jpg

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I guess I would argue that if you are painting the surface to look more like its enameled, which is really the approach I would take with something like a storm trooper uniform, that you aren't really mixing the two techniques in a way that might clash. If you are taking metallic armor and painting it with metallic paints and then painting the sword in NMM its not going to look right. What you, and Monkeysloth, are describing just doesn't really mix the two techniques.

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I agree with the storm trooper example above.  Take something that is shiny, but not necessarily metal- like a car.  Sure, it has blue paint on it, but it definitely interacts well with the light similar to something metallic.  You can paint the shiny, reflective surface of the car in NMM, then use metallic metals for other areas that are more like raw metal.

 

If you're going to do that, use the same techniques on your metallic metals as you would on your NMM (this technique is called "true metallics" nowdays).  Basically, you still need the mini to show the same source of light for everything, or your effect will diminish.

 

 

I'm going to counter and say the best way to do metallics is to shade them with non-metalic colors.  It's also a great way to get weathering in.

 

There's one more step to this process.  Paint the metals halfway, then seal the mini with matt sealer before you finish it.

 

The combination of flatness and shininess will add quite a bit of depth to a mini.

 

 

But every painter should learn both NMM and MM techniques.  They'll inform one another, and you'll only be better for it in the end.

Edited by odinsgrandson
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So, one of the hindrance of using NMM & TMM together is the artificial vs. natural sheen. With the storm trooper and car examples, wouldn't the different materials/finish explanation still have that problem?

 

The way I make sense of the artificial vs. natural sheen for the minis I paint is to look at it and imagine the light source is stationary based on the mini POV not to mine. I think of it as admiring a sculpture in a museum, I'm not rotating the sculpture but I'm going around it. I always like to think of everything I paint as a diorama.

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This is why you use normal paints to shade and detail TMM so you can control it and make it be shiny where you want it to be and not so shiny where you don't want it to be, at least that's how I always interpreted it.

 

I've seen people use metallics to shade or highlight metallics and I always think it comes out poorly compared to shading with non-metallic paint.

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This is why you use normal paints to shade and detail TMM so you can control it and make it be shiny where you want it to be and not so shiny where you don't want it to be, at least that's how I always interpreted it.

 

I get it, like I said it's how I do my metallics. What I meant was with the examples given, how is using NMM to represent shiny paint or enamel surface any different from using NMM to represent metal, all in the context of using NMM together with TMM on a single figure?

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I don't know, the whole reason I ask is because I think TMM is easier to do well, less can go wrong, it doesn't take as many layers to make it look good, while NMM takes a lot of work and a ton of practice to consistently do well. This particular model I'm painting has just poorly cast trim and doing NMM on it is a real paint so I was considering just doing TMM on the trim and keeping the armor itself a sort of NMM, but I just went ahead and did NMM.

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