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Experiment in reds


Limey72
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Slendertroll is right, but red has 2 methods - the pink path and the orange.  It's like green, which can have white added (minty) or yellow (warm).  The issue here is not so much the orange, but how much orange there is.  The midtone color (in this case red) should be dominant with highlights and shadows generally using less surface than the dominant color.  Switching to the pink route in this case would only change the cloak to looking pink instead of orange. 

 

Vibrant red should go: deepest dark shade red > slightly dark red > red > red orange > orange   The middle three should collectively occupy the most area.

 

The pink route works likewise, but results in a pale appearance which may or may not be what is desired.  To use green as an example, cool minty green might look out of place if the garb/setting evoked a warm climate - and similarly yellow green might look out of place if the garb/setting suggested cold.  Unless being used for specific effect, cool goes with cool and warm with warm.  So the pink (desaturated) look goes well with cool/cold.  It would work for a winter scene.

 

But probably not for a red dragon, which commonly breathes fire.  Going the orange highlight path would better evoke that sense. 

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Hey folks how do some of these posts get tagged as hot ( like this did) and some don't. Is it the firey theme ;)

The amount of replies and/or views the thread gets.

 

I thought it was the amount of "Likes" on the first post that determined this.

 

Edit: Sorry, got it confused with "Popular".

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I think this just goes to show there are plenty of great ways to do red, it just comes down to your personal preference. Check out plenty of youtube videos, read tutorials from places like Massive Voodoo and Coloured Dust, and keep asking questions/getting feedback on your own stuff.

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Indeed uber, you and all of the other posters who have given me advice and links on this and other posts have proven to be a great source of inspiration and allow me to improve as a painter. Thank you all ;)

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I was given advice by a fellow painter once that on highlighting reds, to avoid the "pink" factor, you can use a "bone" color (basically the bone triad) to steer it more towards the natural light highlights without having to go into the artificial looking pinks. Mostly due to bone colors containing small amounts of yellows. I tried it and I liked it better than the white. I think the skin triads are ok, but tend to bring the red closer to different shades (bronze having browns and flesh still having the pink in it).

 

Personally, I love using burnt orange and flame orange in small doses, oh and phoenix red too. The wife recommended me to use them and I haven't looked back. She told me to try using carnival purple for the shadows and it was also spot on. Uber you have seen it in the Cloud Giant I was working on during the summer. And, as someone else said, Wren would tell you to experimemt, experiment, experiment.

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