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Using a heat gun to dry paint between coats


lexomatic
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My family just bought a heat gun to do some paint stripping, and I noticed it has a lower setting to dry paint.

I was just wondering if anyone had used a heat gun in this way before and could share tips.

Things I'd be interested in would be length of time, and distance from the mini. Any other thoughts and experiences appreciated.

 

If it matters, I think the low setting is 170 C.

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170 C? Yikes.

 

Dried acrylic paint gets soft at 60 C. I don't think temperatures that high are ever good for it.

 

I use a hair dryer, sometimes, to help acrylic paint dry, but I always use it on the lowest warm setting.

 

With miniatures I have found it helpful to paint more than one thing at a time, so that while one is drying I can work on another. Second best is using the hair dryer.

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I agree with Pingo - a heat gun would probably be way too hot, even at the lowest setting.

 

For me:

 

Strategy #1: Blow on the miniature.  Unless I've added things besides water to the paint, this is actually faster than using the blowdryer.

Strategy #2: Do something else in the meantime.  Another color, another miniature, etc.

Strategy #3: Blowdryer on low heat.  Useful if I've added fluid retarder to the mix, or just applied a wash.

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170 C? Yikes.

 

Dried acrylic paint gets soft at 60 C. I don't think temperatures that high are ever good for it.

 

I use a hair dryer, sometimes, to help acrylic paint dry, but I always use it on the lowest warm setting.

 

With miniatures I have found it helpful to paint more than one thing at a time, so that while one is drying I can work on another. Second best is using the hair dryer.

Ok, scratch that idea. I'm glad I posted before trying. I don't usually have problems rotating between minis, it just seemed worth considering if I wanted to do something really quickly. Maybe if I want to repaint a mini I'll try it and post results.

 

Eyyyy I saw your post on reddit.

Who me? I'm confused.

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At that high of a temperature I would say it intended to be used in a sweeping motion so that no part of the wall is exposed to 170C temps for more than a second or two at a time.  That said, "latex" paint (or I believe "emulsion" outside the US) is similar to our hobby paint in that it uses a binder in water.  So in principle you could use the heat gun to dry your mini, but you would have have to do it using the same type of sweeping motion and give it some time between passes to keep it from getting too hot.  Definitely do not just hold the mini in front of it unless you want to toast it (or soften bones for bending - even that should go quickly at 170C).

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I use a hairdryer on low. At home I generally only need it for thick basecoats on terrain and washes and such. (For runny paint, give it a little bit to dry naturally so it sinks where it's supposed to.) If there's a cordless hairdryer, that would be pretty helpful for conventions, where paint will stubbornly not dry while you're waiting to move on to the next section of a paint class. ;->

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170 C? Yikes.

 

Dried acrylic paint gets soft at 60 C. I don't think temperatures that high are ever good for it.

 

I use a hair dryer, sometimes, to help acrylic paint dry, but I always use it on the lowest warm setting.

 

With miniatures I have found it helpful to paint more than one thing at a time, so that while one is drying I can work on another. Second best is using the hair dryer.

I use a hair dryer if I'm working on a single mini, and don't want to wait for a wash to dry.

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At 170C, it's meant to be held WELL back and blow a warm mix. Given that you held it far enough back, it'd work, but suck down way too much power, try a halogen desk lamp (I had one I was using for extra light partly melt the wing on my GW LOTR Balrog) or, as people have suggested, a hairdryer on a low setting.

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I always find this topic amusing because I'm usually trying to keep my paint from drying that quickly.

Seriously. I just breath on mine and it's dry in a few seconds. But that's what you get with a 15%-20% humidity level.

 

For the times I do need something to dry faster, like an actually wash, I'll use a space heater (in the winter) or just a flexible desk lamp with and old school incandescent light bulb in it. Even 60w gets really hot 3-4" away.

Edited by MonkeySloth
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 If I need to dry something fast, I just put it in the curing oven I made for my greenstuff - an old coffee can with a hinged door cut in the side and a thermometer mounted in it... Close the door, put a desk lamp with an incandescent bulb low down over the open top of it and wait a couple minutes.

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Water requires energy to evaporate. (540 cal/gm, or 0.54 dietitians calories per gram). In the normal course of events, that energy is provided slowly by the air that circulates past, by the energy in whatever is in contact with the water (which is why sweating cools you down),or by radiated energy (from sunlight or the like). Adding extra energy by blowing hot air across the surface of the figure is perfectly reasonable.

 

Problems would arise if you were to add energy so quickly that energy couldn't flow from inward quickly enough to dry the interior before the exterior started to cook.

 

If you're holding the figure in your uncovered fingers, the temperature is unlikely to be high enough to be a problem unless it becomes uncomfortable to hold. As others have noted, if you feather the hot-air stream across the figure from a distance, you should get a reasonable temperature. But note that I'm not responsible if you burn your fingers or something else horrible happens.  ^_^

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