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Gurney is blogging about shooting video and just put up a post about recording the audio that might be interesting.

 

http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com/2015/01/how-to-video-your-art-microphones.html

 

I had considered this, but I'd be using my MXL ribbon mic that I recently got for my small studio setup. I have an audio interface to take the XLR input, add phantom power and send it USB to a computer. It's a really nice inexpensive mic, and you could get a smaller 2-input interface with a single preamp instead of the more expensive unit I use.

 

http://www.mxlmics.com/microphones/studio/R144/

http://us.focusrite.com/usb-audio-interfaces/scarlett-18i8

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