Jump to content

A moment of silence for December 7, 1941


Recommended Posts

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt addresses Congress, 8th December 1941
 

Yesterday, December 7, 1941—a date which will live in infamy—the United States of America was suddenly and deliberately attacked by naval and air forces of the Empire of Japan.

The United States was at peace with that nation, and, at the solicitation of Japan, was still in conversation with its government and its emperor looking toward the maintenance of peace in the Pacific. Indeed, one hour after Japanese air squadrons had commenced bombing in the American island of Oahu, the Japanese ambassador to the United States and his colleague delivered to our secretary of state a formal reply to a recent American message. While this reply stated that it seemed useless to continue the existing diplomatic negotiations, it contained no threat or hint of war or armed attack.

It will be recorded that the distance of Hawaii from Japan makes it obvious that the attack was deliberately planned many days or even weeks ago. During the intervening time the Japanese government has deliberately sought to deceive the United States by false statements and expressions of hope for continued peace.

The attack yesterday on the Hawaiian Islands has caused severe damage to American naval and military forces. I regret to tell you that very many American lives have been lost. In addition, American ships have been reported torpedoed on the high seas between San Francisco and Honolulu.

Yesterday the Japanese government also launched as attack against Malaya.

Last night Japanese forces attacked Hong Kong.

Last night Japanese forces attacked Guam.

Last night Japanese forces attacked the Philippine Islands.

Last night Japanese forces attacked Wake Island.

And this morning the Japanese attacked Midway Island.

Japan has, therefore, undertaken a surprise offensive extending throughout the Pacific area. The facts of yesterday and today speak for themselves. The people of the United States have already formed their opinions and well understand the implications to the very life and safety of our nation.

As commander in chief of the Army and Navy I have directed that all measures be taken for our defense. But always will our whole nation remember the character of the onslaught against us.

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank god for the current friendship with the Japanese, that we have come out of hate and anger and the evils of that time, and into comraudery and peace. No planes fly anymore against our western shores, and no bombs fall on the people of Japan - cherry trees still bloom in Washington, and we and the Japanese reach new heights as allies instead of as foes.

 

May all wars end in the start of a new future - in rebuilding, in friendship, and in the end of hate. And here's to that friendship - we've suffered much at each other's hands, and harrowed hell together, but no war can last forever.

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank god for the current friendship with the Japanese, that we have come out of hate and anger and the evils of that time, and into comraudery and peace. No planes fly anymore against our western shores, and no bombs fall on the people of Japan - cherry trees still bloom in Washington, and we and the Japanese reach new heights as allies instead of as foes.

 

May all wars end in the start of a new future - in rebuilding, in friendship, and in the end of hate. And here's to that friendship - we've suffered much at each other's hands, and harrowed hell together, but no war can last forever.

well said!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Apologies Pingo, I don't click on links. Ingrained habit.

If I wonder about them I quote the post and read where the link goes in the code.

 

 

You can also right-click and "Inspect Element" to get the same information (anywhere, not just on a message board).

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Apologies Pingo, I don't click on links. Ingrained habit.

 

If I wonder about them I quote the post and read where the link goes in the code.

 

You can also right-click and "Inspect Element" to get the same information (anywhere, not just on a message board).

Not on a mobile device, though.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Pearl Harbor Raid

 

 

The Most Anticipated "Surprise Attack" in Military History.

I had several history books in school use phrases like, "surprise attack on Pearl Harbor". But... 

 

Our side was not caught by surprise: The Navy had conducted several anti-aircraft drills in the weeks prior to the attack (because they thought the Japanese might attack). The Army had rounded up all its aircraft and parked them close together in the middle of the field (because they thought Japanese saboteurs might attack). The Navy had the entrance to the harbor blocked with a submarine net and had destroyers patrolling 24/7 outside the entrance (because they thought Japanese subs might attack). The Army had sent one of the first air defense radars in the world to Oahu (because they thought the Japanese might attack). The Navy, remembering its own 1927 Fleet exercise, was launching a full squadron of Catalina Patrol/Search aircraft daily, on patrol arcs, covering all possible air approaches to Pearl Harbor (because they thought the Japanese might attack by air !)

 

 

How To Surprise An Opponent That Knows You're Coming

There are two ways and the Japanese benefited from both: get lucky or get better. It was mostly the latter.

 

 

Three Secret Steps To Victory

When the American Pacific Fleet was moored at its base in Pearl Harbor it was safe. Safe. Admirals on both sides knew this. Here is why: 1) torpedoes were useless, 2) 500 pound bombs were close to useless if dropped on a battleship, 3) patrol aircraft could easily spot an incoming air raid.  What Japan did about these problems is fix them systematically and secretly.

 

Torpedoes:  Torpedoes dropped  into the water from airplanes plunged to 90 feet or more before their gyros and fins brought them back to a ship killing level run depth of 30 feet. Pearl Harbor was only 45 feet deep. A torpedo with its nose buried in mud is useless. The Japanese Navy started experimenting: they slowed their planes down to 5 knots above stall speed before releasing the torpedo, they tinkered with the release mechanism to make the torpedo hit the water at the shallowest possible angle (too shallow and it breaks up: a torpedo is not strong enough to belly flop), they machined hardwood bolt-on extensions for the torpedo's fins and all three changes together bought them the depth they needed. No other navy in the world could drop a torpedo in water that shallow and they kept this a secret. :ph34r: 

 

Bombs:  The biggest bomb they had was 250kg (about 500 pounds). Battleships laugh at such things, because they tickle. The solution was not designing a new bomb (takes months: or years). Japan only had weeks to prepare. The solution was putting fins on a 14 inch diameter armor piercing round normally fired from a battleship's gun. Those they had plenty of. It worked and they kept this a secret. :ph34r:

 

Patrol Aircraft:  Japanese Naval aircraft were all VFR. Needed to operate in daylight. The speed, range, distance from which carrier aircraft needed to be launched were well known...to both sides. That made it easy to time the launch of patrol aircraft, which would all but guarantee an incoming air raid would be spotted. Japan fixed this by training their pilots to launch in pre-dawn darkness, in spite of their VFR rated airplanes. They lost some planes and crews in training doing this, but they learned and they kept this a secret. :ph34r:

 

This meant by launching in darkness and flying into the dawn they could get far closer to Oahu without being spotted than anyone knew.

 

 

Luck Does Help; Bad Logistics Hurts

On the morning of December 7, the PBY Catalina that was assigned the search leg that overlapped the main approach path for the incoming air raid had an engine fault. It was bombed sitting on the apron. If it had launched on time it might have detected the raid when it was 60 minutes away.  The Army's radar station was functioning but was not equipped to communicate what it could 'see' in any useful way, telephone wires were planned...delays, delays... 

 

 

What USN Admiral Kimmel Knew and When He Knew It

He knew his base could spot an incoming air raid in time to prepare for it, that his ships were safe from torpedoes, and his battleships would be difficult to hurt with bombs and he was completely correct about all of it up to about September of 1941.

 

He found out differently the morning of December 7th. The 'surprise' was not that the Japanese might attack but that...

 

 

...they were good, very good, and they had some tech that was better than ours.

Edited by TGP
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Mckenna35
      I know there are a few folks that do Bolt Action and similar 28mm wargaming (@buglips), so I thought I'd bounce this out there.
       
      https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/tftb/world-war-ii-soviet-railroad?ref=discovery_recommendations
       
      Story
      Railroads are an important means to transport troops, equipment, ammunition and all other kinds of supply to the front. Especially in a country as vast as the Soviet Union with it's endless steppes, only few reliable roads and no major rivers running in the direction of the German advance during Operation Barbarossa in World War II. 
      With this set of detailed buildings and rolling stock in 1/56 scale for 28mm figures you get the opportunity to recreate the crucial fighting around the Soviet railroad system.
      The kits focus on the major pieces of rolling stock available to the Soviet defenders: box cars, gondola cars and flat cars. And the mighty ALCo RSD-1 Diesel Engine which was made available under the US Lend-Lease Act.
      Also included is a typical rural train station with optional additional platforms for all who want to depict a Soviet - or captured German - supply depot, where heavy equipment like tanks and guns are being unloaded.
      And for all of you looking for an armored train - don't worry! We have you covered.
        Talking about railroad tracks:
      We did not see the need to reinvent the wheel, so all kits are designed to be used with
      4Ground Railroad Tracks (available as add-ons to the Kickstarter) or O Gauge Model Railroad Tracks The kits include optional parts enabling you to choose your favorite system while assembling. Going this route has allowed us to concentrate on designing and producing the rolling stock only, which has the advantage of an earlier fulfillment date for the Kickstarter.
      All models are highly detailed on the outside and inside. The interiors are easily accessible, as roofs are removable. In addition, all doors are moveable, which means you can open or close them during gameplay.
       
    • By SisterMaryNapalm
      Hello everyone,
       
      A new piece of work.
       
      This time it's a WWII themed diorama, 1/72 scale (which makes around half the size of a 28mm figure. The diorama itself has around the size of two smartphones.
       
      The whole project is my entry to a painting competition in a German forum and the first finished work since February 2020 - so one year ago.
       
      The main model, PzKpfw IV Ausf. J, is almost 25 years old. I got this model when I was a kid, and I painted it thickly using email colours, but I never assembled it. Last August, when I moved, I found the model and gave it an overhaul, and when February arrived, I took my time to paint it, do the figures and the diorama.
       
       
      As always: If you like what you see, and you have nothing more to say, leave a like as a nod to my participation in the forums. I don't need "nice", "cool", "excellent" or "awesome", because those words are used way too frequently to mean anything.
       
       
      //
       
       
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      //
       
      When I have got time, I need to get some plywood to cover the outside of the diorama, but, to be honest - I am way too lazy to do it now. lol.
       
      Check my Instagram page for other work, if you like:

      https://www.instagram.com/sistermarynapalm/
       
       
       
    • By Mckenna35
      Friend of mine asked me to paint these for his Flames of War army.  He did the assembly and primer, and will be adding crew and markings.  He likes painting 15mm infantry and can't stand doing vehicles for some reason.  I'm pretty much the opposite!  Anyway, I'm assuming they're Battlefront models.  Base colors were airbrushed with Tamiya.  Details and highlights were Reaper and Vallejo. Tried using oil paint for the wash for the first time and 'm really impressed with how well it works for this application.  Surface tension is a LOT lower than using acrylics so it's a lot easier to get the wash into all the nooks and crannies.  Used pigments to add 'texture' to the tracks and dirty up the fenders.  All the 'metal' bits are actually done with a mechanical pencil and 2b lead. Pretty happy with how these turned out.





    • By Heisler
      These have been in the WIP section for a while now and I finally finished them up. If your are curious about the process I have a complete list of links to my blog detailing everything that was done. I finished three of these but figured you only need to see pictures of one of them, they are all very similiar.
       
      The U304(f) are captured WWII French Halftracks (P107) which were armored by the Germans and served with the 21st Panzer Division in Normandy. They are among a large number of conversions of French vehicles created by Major Alfred Becker.
       

       
       
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/04/world-war-ii-project-return-to-normandy_30.html [The Beginning]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/05/world-war-ii-project-return-to-normandy.html [Axles]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/05/world-war-ii-project-return-to-normandy_4.html [Windscreens]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/05/world-war-ii-project-return-to-normandy_5.html [MGs]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/05/world-war-ii-project-return-to-normandy_7.html [Primer]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/05/world-war-ii-project-return-to-normandy_11.html [Base Coat]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/05/world-war-ii-project-return-to-normandy_12.html [Decals]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/08/world-war-ii-project-p107-fu304-f-21st.html [Paintwork]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/08/world-war-ii-project-p107-fu304-f-21st_25.html [Paintwork con’t]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/09/world-war-ii-project-p107-fu304-f-21st.html [Chipping]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/09/world-war-ii-project-p107-fu304-f-21st_10.html [Streaking]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/09/world-war-ii-project-p107-fu304-f-21st_17.html [Dust & Dirt]
      https://wargamesandrailroads.blogspot.com/2020/09/world-war-ii-project-p107-fu304-f-21st_10.html [Tracks & Wheels]
       
       
       
       
    • By Standifer
      It is never a good idea to play a alternate history video game when you own a 3d printer and love history. My first mini off the the printer is the T95 tank destroyer It was an American prototype. This is in 1/100 scale and it is big for that scale.
      It will need to be cured tomorrow and cleaned up for assembly. 
      Here it is mock assembled next to a Flames of war 76mm Sherman.



      Currently working on tiger 2, 105 Pershing and E-100 Turrets. The hulls will come after that.
      Now to find a good looking Maus Stl .
  • Who's Online   10 Members, 0 Anonymous, 40 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...