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Lox Jarg, Wings of Dishonor (Or: Dave Plays With Inks)


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No different than glazing with paint, I just don't add any matte medium with the inks (thinned with water only).

 

The blue was about 12 coats of 15:1 water:pthalocyanine blue (green shade) ink, and the yellow was 10:1 water:yellow medium azo ink. It only took 5 coats to get the middle feathers to that medium-tone green, and the upper ones were another 5 coats to get that yellow-green.

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Interesting. I've seen the technique before and have always enjoyed the vibrancy of color it produces. Sounds like something fun to play around with.

I'm using Liquitex inks. The Essential Inks set comes with six colors: Phalo Blue, Med Yellow Azo, Translucent Burnt Umber, Black, White, and Naphthol Crimson. There's also a Metallic Inks set, but I can't really see a use for it.

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