Jump to content

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 71
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Decorations, especially nutcrackers and bubble lights. Wrapping presents up very pretty, then watching people rip them to shreds! My mom once tried to open one of my presents very carefully, because of how pretty it was, but I ordered her to rip it up, hehe. Cookies, love the smell of gingerbread cookies! Ugly sweaters and bell earrings. I love wearing earrings that annoy people ^_^

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Moderator

I love my Grandmother's Christmas dinner.  She died several years ago now, but I still remember Chirstmas at her house. She was Swedish and my Grandfather Norwegian/Swedish.  Grandma would deck the house with traditional Swedish Christmas decorations. The dinner was amazing.  Her long table was set with about 100 candles.  We only ate by candle light.  One of the candles heated a fan that spun and made bells tinkle throughout the dinner.  The food was amazing.  It was a traditional Scandinavian immigrant Christmas dinner with Swedish meatballs, hand stuffed Korve (Swedish potato sausage), peas, mashed potatoes, cream sauce, melted butter, homemade lefse, and more.  Of course the center of it all was the Lutefisk.  My grandmother actually made good lutefisk, but it still took me about 18 years to learn to like it.  I remember us boys (my cousins and I) always sat by Grandpa and he would insist that we all eat at least a little of the Lutefisk.  He'd also ensure that we all ate everything we put on our plates. I miss my Grandpa a lot, even though it's been 20 years since he died.

 

For dessert, we'd always have rice pudding with crem (not sure how to spell it, but it was a lingon berry or raspberry syrup grandma made).  In the pudding, Grandma would hide an almond.  Whoever found the almond would get good luck that year. One of the funniest years was when no one got it and Grandma was baffled until she found the almond still on the kitchen counter.  We decided that she got the almond that year.

 

Every other year (my dad is German and doesn't want Lutefisk every year) my mom puts on the full Scandanavian Christmas spread like Grandma did, but as an adult I find it harder now to get lost in the magic of all those candles like I did as a boy.

 

Another tradition that my German grandma did was to hide a glass spider in her Christmas tree.  My sister and I would always rush to the tree, trying to be the first to find the spider.  Grandpa would always play German Christmas carols on his harmonica and Dad would often start singing, getting the rest of us going.  Speaking of singing, that was another tradition.  When we would be driving to Christmas at the grandparents, we would always sing carols.  My dad is an amazing singer and we would all sing in the car.  One song, "The Friendly Beasts" was my favorite as we each had our parts.  Mom was the donkey, I was the cow, Dad the sheep, and my sister Rory was the dove, then we would all do the last verse together. (I'm getting a little misty here.)

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites

Family eggnog recipe (vanilla ice cream that contains egg yolks+nutmeg+rum), Elf on the Shelf, extended family party a couple of weeks prior, Christmas crackers, National Lampoons' Christmas Vacation, Elf, Christmas lights, etc.

 

The best thing so far has been seeing my four year old enjoy the season. She is loving every minute of it.

  • Like 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my Grandmother's Christmas dinner.  She died several years ago now, but I still remember Chirstmas at her house. She was Swedish and my Grandfather Norwegian/Swedish.  Grandma would deck the house with traditional Swedish Christmas decorations. The dinner was amazing.  Her long table was set with about 100 candles.  We only ate by candle light.  One of the candles heated a fan that spun and made bells tinkle throughout the dinner.  The food was amazing.  It was a traditional Scandinavian immigrant Christmas dinner with Swedish meatballs, hand stuffed Korve (Swedish potato sausage), peas, mashed potatoes, cream sauce, melted butter, homemade lefse, and more.  Of course the center of it all was the Lutefisk.  My grandmother actually made good lutefisk, but it still took me about 18 years to learn to like it.  I remember us boys (my cousins and I) always sat by Grandpa and he would insist that we all eat at least a little of the Lutefisk.  He'd also ensure that we all ate everything we put on our plates. I miss my Grandpa a lot, even though it's been 20 years since he died.

 

For dessert, we'd always have rice pudding with crem (not sure how to spell it, but it was a lingon berry or raspberry syrup grandma made).  In the pudding, Grandma would hide an almond.  Whoever found the almond would get good luck that year. One of the funniest years was when no one got it and Grandma was baffled until she found the almond still on the kitchen counter.  We decided that she got the almond that year.

 

Every other year (my dad is German and doesn't want Lutefisk every year) my mom puts on the full Scandanavian Christmas spread like Grandma did, but as an adult I find it harder now to get lost in the magic of all those candles like I did as a boy.

 

Another tradition that my German grandma did was to hide a glass spider in her Christmas tree.  My sister and I would always rush to the tree, trying to be the first to find the spider.  Grandpa would always play German Christmas carols on his harmonica and Dad would often start singing, getting the rest of us going.  Speaking of singing, that was another tradition.  When we would be driving to Christmas at the grandparents, we would always sing carols.  My dad is an amazing singer and we would all sing in the car.  One song, "The Friendly Beasts" was my favorite as we each had our parts.  Mom was the donkey, I was the cow, Dad the sheep, and my sister Rory was the dove, then we would all do the last verse together. (I'm getting a little misty here.)

 

 

Wow, your Christmas dinner sounds almost exactly like our Christmas dinner, although being more Norwegian than Swedish no Korve and the Lutefisk was dropped well before my time. We still do everything else including making Lefse all day on Christmas Eve (otherwise there isn't enough to go around).

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

My family also makes homemade lefse on christmas eve. Although this year we made it before Thanksgiving and froze it since my folks will be visiting my sister out east who is having a baby just before christmas this year. So my brother and I are on our own (niether of us can get off work this time of year) But we will have lefse at least . So this year my wife and I are bringing lefse (and my brother) to her family's christmas dinner.

 

We don't have many other traditions other than the dinner and making lefse is actually a fairly recent one, we used to go to Grandma and grandpa's for christmas where didn't get lefse despite grandma being Norwegian. She would bake amazing rolls though. When we stopped travelling for christmas we started buying lefse from a little old lady who made it by the ton, when she stopped making it, only then did we start making it ourselves.

Edited by EvilJames
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Christmas dinner. 2nd Day brunch with my fathers side of the family.

 

Having time to sleep in and do absolutely nothing in a pleasant christmas atmosphere. That is the absolute favorite for me. Christmas treats, computer and those pawn-shop-shows on Discovery.

 

Aww, all those scandinavian Christmas foods. *gets aura of patriotism*

 

For dessert, we'd always have rice pudding with crem (not sure how to spell it, but it was a lingon berry or raspberry syrup grandma made).  In the pudding, Grandma would hide an almond.  Whoever found the almond would get good luck that year. One of the funniest years was when no one got it and Grandma was baffled until she found the almond still on the kitchen counter.  We decided that she got the almond that year.

 

"Riskrem", roughly translated to "Rice and whipped creme". Which is pretty descriptive. We make rice porrige for christmas lunch, and make lots. The porrige is then cooled and mixed with whipped creme for the christmas dinner dessert :)

 

Reading at wikipedia, it seems like English use the word "rice pudding" for both the norwegian "risgrøt" og "riskrem". That said, rice porrige probably isn't all that healty..

 

That exact situation was parodied in a nordic christmas calender show "The Julekalender"*, where the woman in question comments "we forgot the almond once. That year we ate all the riskrem!".

 

At our place we also enjoy the very Norwegian cloudberry cream ("Moltekrem") made with cloudberries picked each year at our cabin. It's really good, typically served alongside christmas cakes and with sugar. It may be extra awesome due to tradition, tho ;)

 

*Not translated. The protagonists of the show are "nisser" that has emigrated to america (due to plot), that return to the old country for an artefact. They speak an english pidgin, which the title plays on. The show is recorded in both Norwegian and Danish.

Edited by Dibbler
  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

The big glass colored strings of lights (not these new-fangled LED things)

Christmas music (especially from the 60's - the old Firestone Christmas albums especially, for those who remember)

A Christmas Story

The smell of a real tree

 

I do wish I had had a few Christmas Days growing up that were below 80 degrees though...

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Dibbler, we do the exact same dessert but with a warm sauce made of cherries!  (Must be the Danish variant.). The first Christmas my husband spent with my family he accidentally ate the almond and almost choked on it.  His complaints of, "No really, I think I swallowed it," were met with annoyance, disbelief and many more servings eaten.  ::P:

 

One of the things I love the most about Christmas is the singing.  People sing along to songs they know and my daughter enjoys being able to burst into song without people thinking she's odd.  We keep talking about going caroling as a family, I think the little ones are almost ready.  ^_^

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the lights, especially at night, I could leave them up all year long. I like the older, cheerful music, but not the newer ones where they wail and moan out each syllable like a dirge. 

 

We don't have any old country family traditions.  The only thing I remember from childhood that I still do is get a can of Pillsbury cinnamon rolls for christmas morning.  :)

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By MoonglowMinis
      Better late than never.

      Here's some fun Pumpkin Horrors I painted up for @Inarah for Secret Sophie this past December.  I was still riding on my Halloween spirit when Secret Sophie began, but wanted to do something that fit the winter theme.  Inspired by the snowman-like design of the Pumpkin horrors and my own past mistakes of leaving pumpkins outside to rot all winter, I decided to do a holiday mashup with these guys left out in the cold too long.

      With some time having passed, I wish I would have made them look a bit rotten and frost-bitten, but I also like the more colorful result.
       

       
      More Photos Below the Spoiler:
       
      These were some fun minis and my first time working with metal.  I have now broken the seal and have started looking into other minis that I previously considered off-limits.  I also enjoyed participating in Secret Sophie and joining in to some of the forum shenanigans.  I highly recommend participating in these kinds of things for any who have been reticent.
       
      What are some of your favorite holiday minis?
    • By odinsgrandson
      Well, here they are. Happy Valentine's Day, and gain +1 population.

    • By 72moonglum
      So some times you just done get things finished with the deadline you have imposed on yourself and this elf was one of those self-imposed deadlines. I wanted to have her done by Christmas, but just got too busy with other miniatures and other things.  I got this figure if I recall last Christmas when I won her with some others on a Reaper Christmas Giveaway on Twitch.  
       
      Here she is:
       

       
      Always thought she was a cute little figure.  The other ones I want but they haven't sold them for a few Christmasses now are the two elves, naughty and nice.  But one of these days I'm sure they will pop up again.
       
      Anyhoos, enjoy, happy belated Christmas and New Year!
       
    • By Dan S
      It has been a while since my last post, I'm am just struggling to find the free time to sit down and paint or build at the moment.
       
      Anyway, this week I got the opportunity to run some run some 'build along' model making workshops with the kids at the Youth Centre where I work, and we have been putting together little X-mas themed display pieces.  It was actually pretty fun being able to share and introduce a new generation to the joys of my nerdy hobby.  I was pretty pleased with how they turned out so I figured I would share. 
       
      The base is just a piece of log, and the moose is a very cheap plastic toy (I repainted mine), which I managed to find at a local discount store in big buckets of 50 animals for £2, they really cheap and nasty, but actually paint up nicely.  Everything else is just standard modeling stuff, sculptamold, static grasses, clump foliage etc.
       
      On another note I have not forgotten about or abandoned my Apocalyptic Suburbia Journal, it is still sat on my desk gathering dust.  I plan to get back to it in the new year.
       



    • By SparrowMarie
      Pretty happy with this. It's the first metal anything that I've successfully painted so also pretty proud about that.
       
      Extremely happy with her face. Might go back and touch-up a few spots. C&C welcome.
       

  • Who's Online   17 Members, 2 Anonymous, 24 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...