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RouterMike

Shadows of Brimstone - Swamps of Death - FFP0702

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Hey all, I've decided to show off a little of what I've been working on lately. I got both kits of the Flying Frog Productions wild west horror game, Shadows of Brimstone in their Kickstarter. My group's been playing through the City of Ancients (unpainted) while I paint up the Swamps of Death minis. Since these will be stored in the original box without any real protection, I am not going to knock myself out with anything much above table quality, so you'll see mould lines and assembly gaps on these. Also the pics are a little darker than I wanted. My light box is a translucent file folder box lit by my painting lights.

 

I set my self the goal of using only the airbrush for the critters in this set. That's the Slashers, Tentacles, Hell Bats and the Harbinger. Only hair brushes for details like eyes and teeth. So far, I'm really happy with how the Slashers and Tentacles turned out. Unfortunately I plowed through those two without taking any pics beyond the whole box of stuff primed. For these guys, the airbrush was a good fit. As a bonus, I got a chance to learn a lot about mixing the SoB branded Army Painter paints for the airbrush. (Compared to MSP, these are thick sludge) 

 

The Slashers came out just how I wanted.

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The Tentacles are pretty decent too. I think some washes could bring out more contrast, but this is how far I got with the airbrush, and I'm happy with how they've come out. They're purple, with a lighter blue for the sucker areas. This is about the muddiest of the pictures.

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The Hell Bats will be tough because they have fiddly bits in a cramped mini. I figure I'll tackle these guys before I get to the Harbinger. I have the wing membranes done with bone. I'm still psyching myself up with the idea of painting the little support vanes with the spray. I think the wing vanes and membranes are going to bleed colors together. I was planning for bone membranes with dark green vanes, but that may have to change as I see just how much control I can get in that close.

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The Harbinger is just going to be flesh colored with the tanned flesh triad. I think something this big is going to be creepy with human coloring. I'd like to work in some purple shadowing around the vanes as well. I'll have to hit that with a very light touch. We'll see how that goes after I knock out the Hell Bats.

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For the Hungry Dead, I tried to copy the ink work Froggy the Great was doing. This didn't come out half as well as I'd hoped. I tried the Daler Rowley inks, but my local art supply only had the primary set with the cyan, magenta, yellow, green and scarlet (which actually turned out orange when applied.) I started with the female's (I'm calling them Lucy) skirts and they came out an orange color I did not like. They got slightly better looking when I went over them again with the magenta but it wasn't right yet. I jumped over to the prospectors (Old Stinky Pete) and tried the cyan on the pants, and it was a little too washed out. My wild west zombies are not shambling about in denim that faded. I'm sure the DR inks I have are illustrator quality, not the darker ones I really needed to use. 

 

Today I picked up the P3 inks in blue, green, yellow and red. These worked a lot better than the DR inks for what I wanted on the guys. They're still lighter than what I want, but they're close. Looking at the picture on my monitor, these look darker than they do here on my desk. Except the Lucys, the rest of these would be awesome if I could get that level of saturated color. The Lucy's are far too bright after I went over them again (!) with the P3 red. The color's what I wanted, but it's a solid coat now. I think I'm going to give the Lucys a wash in watered down Secret Weapon Sewer Water, then one more pass with the P3s for a highlight only. For the guys, I might be able to get by with just another watered down pass with the P3s.

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At this point, Lucy probably needs to be simple greened and begun again, but I don't want to give up on her yet. Pete's just about there already. Once I get the colors right, I'd like to try a shot at a green glow in the eyes on all these guys. 

post-8530-0-03516500-1420282237_thumb.jpg

 

Anyway, that's what I've been working on lately. Comments, constructive criticism and helpful suggestions are more than welcome.

Edited by RouterMike
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OK, It's 3 AM. I'll have to go back and edit the previous post for Grammar later today after I get some sleep. Also, if anyone knows how I can add attachment pictures into a follow up post, that would be appreciated.

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Also, if anyone knows how I can add attachment pictures into a follow up post, that would be appreciated.

 

Click on the "More Reply Options" button next to the Post button. Then, you'll have the ability to Attach files.

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Also, if anyone knows how I can add attachment pictures into a follow up post, that would be appreciated.

 

Click on the "More Reply Options" button next to the Post button. Then, you'll have the ability to Attach files.

 

Wow, apparently my brain had turned to mush. I'm surprised the rest of my post was even halfway coherent. Thanks.

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