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So all, I just finished something this morning, the combination of middle age and wanting to get things done before people start waking up and make me do other random fun things (like take down the Christmas decorations) and I want to seal it.  I normally wait for a day for whatever reason, but I'd like to get this figure finished and move on.  Is there a recommended minimum drying time for paint before you throw varnish on it?

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Depends a lot on your climate. All the paint has to be dry or you risk frosting the miniature. In my dry high altitude climate most acrylics are going to be completely dry within 30 minutes, inks sometimes take a little longer. Many painters wait 24 hours to be sure everything is completely set. It also depends on if you have used any other types of paints on your miniature like enamels or oils. Those can take much longer to set which is why the 24 hour mark is a good rule of thumb. Again, I have sealed within 30 minutes of finishing a mini without a problem, your mileage may vary.

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i have actually sealed mine as soon as the paint feels dry,, sometimes in under 30 minutes,,  I do not live in a climate that is dry (east coast canada cannot be called that) and have no issues with frosting.  Mind you I only have Reaper's paints so no enamels or oils are ever used.

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I live in Nebraska, and it is about nine degrees right now outside. I'm an advocate of the 24 hour wait typically , but I just want to get this coated so I can finish up the base and move on. I've only used Reaper acrylics on the figure.

 

And I finished it around 11.oo or so and now it's one.

Edited by 72moonglum

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If using Reaper sealer I would say you are fine to go.  If you had a test piece to try it on that would be even better.

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Best practice is to wait 24 hours, since it takes that long for most of the water to migrate out of even a very thin film of acrylic paint.

 

However, clearly one can fudge that some.

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Where I live on the north shore of Lake Superior I can usually seal within 30 minutes during the dry winter weather.  Summers have gotten to be damnedly humid over the past few years so I generally wait 12-24 hours just to make sure I avoid disasters.  Stupid global warming . . .

 

The Egg

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So I eventually gave up and sealed him around 4.30 if I recall correctly. Seemed to work okay. Small problems with dried pieces of sealant in a few spots and I dropped the figure once and had to touch him up, but other than that, I didn't really encounter any major issues.

Edited by 72moonglum
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Ya, with Nebraska's humidity I'd wait 24 hours.

 

wait, this is indoors in Nebraska, in the winter... What humidity?  When you raise air from -20 to +25 C there is no moisture left!

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Ya, with Nebraska's humidity I'd wait 24 hours.

 

wait, this is indoors in Nebraska, in the winter... What humidity?  When you raise air from -20 to +25 C there is no moisture left!

 

 

Yup. Dew point is a much better measure of indoor humidity than outdoor relative humidity. (Assuming that your indoor temp is relatively constant, of course.)

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