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Kickstarter & Amazon Payments Part Ways


ub3r_n3rd
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Credit cards are still using 1960s technology and are inherently insecure.  While there is still some onus on the vendor or payment processing entity regarding the security of transaction information, keep in mind that the system itself is broken and will continue to be until the card companies themselves fundamentally change how credit cards work.

 

That said, I use credit cards for my purchases because most cards offer good protection against fraud.  I never use a debit card, and I think they're a form of Russian roulette:  if anything ever happens with those, you're trying to recover money that you've already lost, rather than disputing a charge you don't want to pay for.

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the system itself is broken and will continue to be until the card companies themselves fundamentally change how credit cards work.

It will as soon as the cost of fraud resolution overcomes the cost of upgrading the entire system.

 

But that's why my concern was more about the back end finances of the company rather than my own interaction. My card has great fraud resolution, it happens once every year or two. I usually catch it before they do, even as good as they are, because I try to stay on top of my statements online.

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I honestly don't get what the big fuss is from all of you people who are worried about them switching CC processing companies w/out notifying you. I'm sure you all go to dozens of places every week where you have no clue who they use for payment processing, (obviously including Reaper) but this is a big deal why?

Edited by Chrome
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I honestly don't get what the big fuss is from all of you people who are worried about them switching CC processing companies w/out notifying you. I'm sure you all go to dozens of places every week where you have no clue who they use for payment processing, (obviously including Reaper) but this is a big deal why?

 

 

a) Because I don't go to dozens of places every week where I have no clue ... I mostly pay in cash and on the internet I think I can count the shops I order from on one hand

b) Because I believe it's only good customer service to inform the customer of such a decision (the difference between your example and here is obvious: if I don't have a clue who handles my information I know that I don't have a clue ... if I assume Amazon handles my information because that's what it has been like for quite some time now ... and am not informed about a change I find that a bit misleading)

c) You seem to imply that people are exaggerating ... but I feel that you are also unfairly exaggerating. I don't think that "big fuss" is a fair description of what people have expressed here. 

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*drops two twenty cents*

 

I've installed several different payment gateways for a variety of client eCommerce sites or one shot situations.

 

PayPal, Amazon, VirtueMart (or whatever their new name is), Intuit QuickBooks, Stripe as well as Authorize.net and some highly scary custom jobs for larger banks.

 

For each and every payment gateway company, there's an API that allows the developer to just use the payment gateway with zero information about that company being shared with the end-user.

 

"Seamless" is what I see a lot in promotional stuff about their APIs.

 

From a user standpoint, people love seeing the PayPal and Amazon logos on the site and I am a big proponent of selling their stability to my client's end users.  But a programmer can grab the logo from PayPal and put it on their site and never use the service.

 

Some people just like seeing the https:// url and expect the site to be completely secure for it.  Let me rattle you and state ... just because they have a secure certificate to add that "S" to the link, doesn't mean they are handling your information securely.  I can handle the form you just filled out completely secured by SSL Secure Certificate and you'd never see the https on the front end.

 

 

If you want to truly protect yourself from Fraud and Identity Theft you are better off using your bank (Credit Card or some Debit Cards) and some ID protection service like LifeLock.

 

A perfectly built or setup payment gateway has nothing to do with the moral fiber of the company who created the website and is taking your funds.  We shutdown a client who's business practices were criminal.  We installed everything correctly and they used PayPal's full ecommerce gateway (no PayPal visible to end-users).  The owner was just a really, really bad guy ... reduced anger response, insert imaginative expletives of choice.

 

The most counseled advice for using online services ... get a secured low-limit credit card from your bank where you can transfer money to it from your checking or savings account with great fraud protection and use that for all online services. 

 

You should also never login to your bank's mobile app or website via your phone on a cellular broadband or open wi-fi. 

 

Read up on the companies you are going to buy from.

 

Or just never have any money in your account like me.  ;)

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I've pledged on some non-US projects that didn't use Amazon already, so this probably won't make a big difference for me. I don't even actually know who was the third party provider handling payments with Kickstarter UK projects, but seemed to all work fine.

 

That said, I might not have been so likely to use Kickstarter in the first place if Amazon hadn't been involved. I've had good experiences with Amazon, so knowing they were handling the payments made me much more comfortable using what was a new website to me. By now I've used Kickstarter enough that it's a pretty trusted brand to me itself though, so the Amazon connection is less relevant.

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But a programmer can grab the logo from PayPal and put it on their site and never use the service.

 

You absolutely can do that. And you might be liable for a trademark violation (because you're trading on their reputation without authorization). Whether you're likely to be chased down for that by PayPal is, of course, a completely separate question.

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But a programmer can grab the logo from PayPal and put it on their site and never use the service.

 

You absolutely can do that. And you might be liable for a trademark violation (because you're trading on their reputation without authorization). Whether you're likely to be chased down for that by PayPal is, of course, a completely separate question.

 

 

I know a few "freelance" developers who have done exactly that.  Unless someone takes the time to research the site and notice that the gateway used isn't PayPal ... or PayPal checks the logo and looks for an account to match ... no one would ever really notice.

 

Even if PayPal notices, the only thing that will occur is they'll get a cease and desist letter or e-mail.

 

Finally, if the scoundrel doesn't remove the logo after the allotted time in the letter, then and only then will legal services get involved.

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Thank you, Ubber, for posting the original article.  I doubt I would've noticed.

 

No problem. It's been a very interesting discussion and I've learned a lot from hearing from people who do the different facets of it all. I honestly feel a lot better about it after what was said in this thread.

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Some people just like seeing the https:// url and expect the site to be completely secure for it.  Let me rattle you and state ... just because they have a secure certificate to add that "S" to the link, doesn't mean they are handling your information securely.

 

Not to mention when something like Heartbleed comes around, and you find out that the "secure" connection you've been trusting has vulnerabilities that could have been exploited.

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Some people just like seeing the https:// url and expect the site to be completely secure for it.  Let me rattle you and state ... just because they have a secure certificate to add that "S" to the link, doesn't mean they are handling your information securely.

 

Not to mention when something like Heartbleed comes around, and you find out that the "secure" connection you've been trusting has vulnerabilities that could have been exploited.

 

 

Or any small lapse in programming validation causes an exploit.  WordPress just had a security issue for major rollout and their sites can auto-update.  Doh!

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It looks like those of us with Discover will probably be SOL.. 

 

Which currencies does Stripe support?

The currencies Stripe supports depend on where your business is located. There’s a full list below.

You can accept payments in your supported currencies from almost any credit card and debit card, no matter where your customer lives. Customers in other countries may be charged additional fees by their bank.

If you’d like to charge international customers in their local currency, we’ll automatically convert funds, with a conversion fee on top of market rates.

US and Europe

Currently, businesses in the US and Europe can create charges in the following 138 currencies for Visa, Mastercard and American Express credit cards. Some of these currencies are zero-decimal currencies that require an amount in regular denomination (as opposed to in cents for all other currencies) when creating a charge.

Please note that some currencies are unsupported for American Express cards. We’re working to make additional currencies available in other countries as quickly as possible.

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