Jump to content

The Horror Of Repetition


Dr.Bedlam
 Share

Recommended Posts

I honestly feel bad for anyone who has had "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" ruined by over-quoting. It deserves to be ruined on it's own merits. Only thing that would make it worse would be to have had it happen with "The Princess Bride" instead.

 

Nothing has been so ruined by repetition for me than the Princess Bride. If it's playing in a room full of people, I will just quietly leave.

 

The only "Simpsons" I have ever seen is the three minute short from "The Tracey Ullman Show." And when it was broadcast I said to my now-husband, "Hey, they've done a cartoon of Matt Groenig's 'Life in Hell' only they changed the rabbits to people." And I thought that that was neat but that the cartoon was only so-so and never watched the series.

 

It is pretty much that, but they did some pretty good work with the 3022-minute format. I agree with Buglips that the show had a pretty long run of brilliant comedy before they started to run out of creative steam.

Edited by klarg1
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 285
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

I hate that ANYBODY can't watch Python Grail or Princess Bride. Those are two of my faves.

 

But the actual MOVIE, ET, I've only seen twice... it was the advertising, merch, and ad tie-ins that made me all fed up with it.

 

Interestingly... you don't see the movie much any more. Or any merchandising. Like it buurned itself out...

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was younger I had a friend who argued with me incessantly that all of the fantasy I read was crap and I should read David Eddings instead. Eventually this included A Game of Thrones. It was all I heard about for what seemed like two years. I never did end up reading either.

 

I had a similar thing happen to me with The Princess Bride. For whatever reason everyone around me loved it, but all I heard were out-of-context quotes.

 

There are a number of things like that, at least for the people I know, where someone gets so overwhelmed with the hoopla around something that the urge to actually enjoy the original work is gone--perhaps never to return.

 

I've made a practice, every few years, of going to one of the things I've avoided and watching or reading it. Getting over that stubbornness and aversion is healthy, I figure, and there's some good stuff I've missed out on.

 

Princess Bride wasn't bad, either.

 

The Disney-ication of our childhoods is another matter entirely.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

The Disnification of our childhoods is the stripping out all that is rightly offensive in myth, dessicating it with over-merchandising, and then sending the mosquito swarm of direct-to-video sequels to extract whatever life is left.  Then they hook up electrodes to jumpstart the corpse.

 

My wife had a student tell her once when she was teaching first grade:  "No, [Mrs Froggy], Alice in Wonderland isn't a book, it's a Disney movie" in a tone honestly offended by grown-up stupidity.

 

Yes, I'm angry.  Myth should be uncomfortable, offensive, and compelling.  Cinderella's sisters cutting their feet short to fit into the slippers should NOT be a musical number.

 

Actually, I would have forgiven the movie if they'd left that scene in and made it a musical number.  Never mind.

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Disnification of our childhoods is the stripping out all that is rightly offensive in myth, dessicating it with over-merchandising, and then sending the mosquito swarm of direct-to-video sequels to extract whatever life is left.  Then they hook up electrodes to jumpstart the corpse.

There are broader social implications than that--Disney also serves as a handy shorthand for the homogenization of childhood experience itself. Once upon a time, people all experienced different things, read different books, knew different people, had different activities, etc. You'd have a couple of things that were widely available, but they weren't the foundation of anyone's childhood, generally. Nowadays there are ready-built tribes for people of different interests based on which incredibly-popular media you happened to have consumed during your impressionable years. Maybe you weren't on the swim team or didn't read fantasy novels or didn't watch Power Rangers (ugh) but the vast majority of us have a frame of reference for what that stuff is. We meet fewer and fewer people with unusual life experiences.

 

As someone who's not really good at being a part of a cohesive social group, I find the situation profoundly weird--not that I've known anything different, really.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've made a practice, every few years, of going to one of the things I've avoided and watching or reading it. Getting over that stubbornness and aversion is healthy, I figure, and there's some good stuff I've missed out on.

For me, it was the Neal Stephenson novel Snowcrash. I had some roommates in college who were obsessed with it, quoted it constantly, and designed every RPG character they possibly could off of it (well, that and Neuromancer). It drove me batty. Too bad, really, because by the time I finally read it, I was no longer in its target audience.

 

I make it a point to try foods that I don't like just to see if my tastes have changed. Good thing too, or I'd be missing out on salad, cider, all forms of alcohol, and cheesecake. Well, I'd probably be better off without the cheesecake...

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Disnification of our childhoods is the stripping out all that is rightly offensive in myth, dessicating it with over-merchandising, and then sending the mosquito swarm of direct-to-video sequels to extract whatever life is left.  Then they hook up electrodes to jumpstart the corpse.

 

My wife had a student tell her once when she was teaching first grade:  "No, [Mrs Froggy], Alice in Wonderland isn't a book, it's a Disney movie" in a tone honestly offended by grown-up stupidity.

 

Yes, I'm angry.  Myth should be uncomfortable, offensive, and compelling.  Cinderella's sisters cutting their feet short to fit into the slippers should NOT be a musical number.

 

Actually, I would have forgiven the movie if they'd left that scene in and made it a musical number.  Never mind.

To a certain extent I agree. However Snow White, or Cinderella, or a lot of the older Disney Fairy Tale movies, I think really where good, in that they expanded the audience they where intended for (which was not children, in spite of what some might say) and made them something interesting and enjoyable. Take Bambi for an example. They did not sterilize it overly much in the places that count, and parts of it still freak the crap out of me, and bring me to tears.

 

As with the first grade student. Well of course. At that age, if you know something to be one thing, a Disney movie for example, it seems reasonable to think that is all it ever was, and you know it is, so anyone who says otherwise has to be wrong. That's just how kids minds work in a lot of cases.

 

I still hate the oversaturation of the market, and especially the money grabber sequels that really never should have been made.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I was younger I had a friend who argued with me incessantly that all of the fantasy I read was crap and I should read David Eddings instead.

David Eddings wrote very good formulaic epic fantasy. He knew every last trope and cliché and wove them together entertainingly. Apart from some irritating treatment of female characters, his fantasy novels are utterly unobjectionable. I recommend his books to people who want to read exactly what they've read before, but with different word order.

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 When I was younger I had a friend who argued with me incessantly that all of the fantasy I read was crap and I should read David Eddings instead.

David Eddings wrote very good formulaic epic fantasy. He knew every last trope and cliché and wove them together entertainingly. Apart from some irritating treatment of female characters, his fantasy novels are utterly unobjectionable. I recommend his books to people who want to read exactly what they've read before, but with different word order.

Good to know I wasn't missing anything there.

 

I always used Terry Brooks for the same purpose.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 When I was younger I had a friend who argued with me incessantly that all of the fantasy I read was crap and I should read David Eddings instead.

David Eddings wrote very good formulaic epic fantasy. He knew every last trope and cliché and wove them together entertainingly. Apart from some irritating treatment of female characters, his fantasy novels are utterly unobjectionable. I recommend his books to people who want to read exactly what they've read before, but with different word order.

Good to know I wasn't missing anything there.

 

I always used Terry Brooks for the same purpose.

 

Terry Brooks is much the same. It is entertaining, but it is certainly not 'new'

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back on topic:

 

 

Does anyone fondly remember Titanic?  I feel like that one fell long and hard from grace- it was the film that out-sold Star Wars and now we talk about it like it was the Spice Girls.

 

Now, I wasn't part of the audience that made it such a huge success, and by the time I saw the movie, I was definitely over it already.  I remember that radio stations started having rules about not playing "My Heart Will Go On (Theme from Titanic)" more than once every fifteen minutes because they'd get requests to play it again immediately after they played it.

 

However, since then, I have learned that both Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio are both fantastic actors (just watch Aviator and Eternal Sunshine of a Spotless Mind).  I have a hard time thinking that the movie is as bad as all that.

 

I also remember that everyone was excited that Episode 1 was going to topple Titanic's numbers.  And I honestly think it would have, if it had been a really good movie instead of what Lucas delivered.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...