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Bones Hill giants WIP


Marineal
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So, I've been glazing these guys for the last 2 hours... and I'm to the point where I don't see a change when I do it, and also I highlighted a shadow because I'm not paying attention. So, I figured with the camera and y'alls help, maybe we could finish these up tomorrow. I can already see a spot on his arm where I didn't wash his hair/fur...

 

ETA: The joints are not yet glued. gonna need some greenstuff. 

 

The skin (minus the face) is really the only thing I would call 'complete-ish', and I'm looking for some constructive criticism. I'm trying to advance beyond tabletop quality, into competition quality if I can get there. IF these guys behave themselves, I may do something with them for Reapercon... we'll see. So that's what I"m looking for. 

 

Bring me your nitpicking!!

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Edited by Marineal
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So, this is my current progress. I am back to what I'm calling step 1.5. 

I rebasecoated them except for their heads and their hands that still had plenty of contrast. I think I blended the basecoat too much, gotta leave some on there!

Gonna work on some other stuff on my desk for a bit, then come back to them.

 

20150225_103324.jpg?w=169&h=300

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I loved these sculpts too.

 

TBH, if you want to make this competition pieces, the pics show little contrast in that skin. Incorporate color nuances, use bolder shadows, give the giants' shapes and muscles weight, size and power!

 

Another tip to make them more natural is to go darker towards the ground, and light towards the top (especially on these large figures). Broadly speaking, if you separate the mini in three parts (lower body, mid-body and upper body/whatever is above the chest line), your first shadow for the mid-body should be your basecoat for the lower body, and the mid-body first highlight should be the basecoat for the upper-body. 

 

Then, you go deeper shadows on the lower body, and higher highlights on the upper body, giving the face some extra dose of shadows (reaching the shadow range of the lower body) for contrast, making it a focal point.

 

I use that notion in all my minis and feel it makes it easier to achieve a cohesive look. The technique is called, if I am not mistaken, "Global Zenital Highlighting", and IMHO is crucial for big pieces.

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I loved these sculpts too.

 

TBH, if you want to make this competition pieces, the pics show little contrast in that skin. Incorporate color nuances, use bolder shadows, give the giants' shapes and muscles weight, size and power!

 

Another tip to make them more natural is to go darker towards the ground, and light towards the top (especially on these large figures). Broadly speaking, if you separate the mini in three parts (lower body, mid-body and upper body/whatever is above the chest line), your first shadow for the mid-body should be your basecoat for the lower body, and the mid-body first highlight should be the basecoat for the upper-body. 

 

Then, you go deeper shadows on the lower body, and higher highlights on the upper body, giving the face some extra dose of shadows (reaching the shadow range of the lower body) for contrast, making it a focal point.

 

I use that notion in all my minis and feel it makes it easier to achieve a cohesive look. The technique is called, if I am not mistaken, "Global Zenital Highlighting", and IMHO is crucial for big pieces.

I had heard of zenithal lighting, but I was unaware this was how they achieved it. Thanks so much! gonna have to go play with this technique now!

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I had heard of zenithal lighting, but I was unaware this was how they achieved it. Thanks so much! gonna have to go play with this technique now!

 

 

Be aware that what we usually do (highlight the tops, shadow the... lower parts LOL) IS zenithal highlighting (zenital means we assume the light source is on top, like a sun at midday).

 

The technique (or more, an idea) I referred above is called "global" because it also ties into the notion that your feet would not be as light as your head, that means, the head is closer to the light source!

 

Basically you shift the light-dark range slightly depending on the zone you are painting. This is usually subtle but creates, again IMHO and more visibly in large pieces, a better sense of weight and volume, since the eye picks up the different in lightness and assumes a volume is in place, that the torso softly shadows the legs, etc.

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Alright, worked on them some more. I'm going for a pale, natural-looking skin tone. I was trying to do it just by purely glazing, but I think I'm going to have to flesh wash them. I think the Pale Skin triad is a touch too pale. 

20150225_2143531.jpg?w=300&h=169

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I also think my white background is washing them out... what do y'all think? I feel like I should push the contrast more. May just have to add a little darker tone to the pale shadow? This is a LOT of skin.. 

ETA: for some reason these pictures turned out really small.. They're full size on my blog. Sorry!

Edited by Marineal
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Yeah, I'd still go darker on those shadows in the skin.

 

I was over on WAMP the other day and ran across this guy, look at how he goes from purple in the darkest areas and low areas to a really light green. The skin is still quite a mix of colors that he's glazed and blended together really nicely, but it still reads as "green."

 

For yours, I'd try to add in some light red glazes down in those shadowed areas. If you look at pale skin, you see red underneath. I'm not sure HOW pale you really want to go, but even albino skin color has contrasts. Check out this photo for reference:

 

 

ie247085.jpg

 

 

 

You can see reds, pinks, and deep DARK shadows with this zenithal lighting on the picture. Look at the muscles and how the light hits the top most areas and the lack of light in those deeper areas and areas that aren't exposed to the light.

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
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That is an awesome ork. 

 

I'll try some different glazes and see what I end up with. I'm going for a cave giant kind of look, so really pale, but I'm doing warm colors on all the furs/whatnot. 

 

Thanks for the advice!!

Also, the spoiler picture is broken. :(

 

No problem.

 

Broken? I see it fine... are you behind a firewall?

 

I found it at another site, see if it works now.

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
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That is an awesome ork.

 

I'll try some different glazes and see what I end up with. I'm going for a cave giant kind of look, so really pale, but I'm doing warm colors on all the furs/whatnot.

 

Thanks for the advice!!

Also, the spoiler picture is broken. :(

No problem.

 

Broken? I see it fine... are you behind a firewall?

 

I found it at another site, see if it works now.

Spoiler image broken for me too. No firewall.

 

Also, loving the giants and the tips being given.

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