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Sculpting Advice? Faces, details, anything really


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It's a fair form. The chin is a little weak -- I think you'll find that the whole lower half of a human face down to the chin generally sits a good bit forward of the eyes.

 

The eye sockets don't come down far enough or indent enough. The upper brow is good, if a little soft, but the lower edge of the hemispherical indentation which holds the eyeballs isn't quite there.

 

The eye sockets should merge a little more smoothly with the nose ridge as well.

 

You might wish to consider doing some studies of human skulls, either sculpted or drawn. They really give a sense of how the human face works and is shaped.

Edited by Pingo
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Had some more time for sculpting.  Facial Sculpt study - Attempt #2 - The zoom feature on my camera shows me the limitations of the human eye and my need for a magnifying glass desktop lamp for sculpting.  

 

Stylistically, this is a departure from the chibi style I want eventually.  

 

 

I had to check this post three times to make sure I hadn't mixed up your name with someone else's. That... it's a VAST improvement. I'd like to imagine that that's a broom-handle in the picture, but I guess it must be a toothpick. Wow, remind me how long you've been sculpting for? I am impressed.

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Pingo - I appreciate the direction for further improvement. I have pulled reference pictures and books for this version, but 2d pictures are only taking me so far. So, my attempts here are a "study" of the 3d sculpting as I work to improve my skill with the tools.

 

I am actually surprised by the lack of more definitive references! I was really expecting to be able to find a better resource for facial expressions. I have compiled online photos of faces from a few angles and expressions, but it isn't quite what I was hoping to find.

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Cosmic - thanks for the encouragement. This one felt like a step forward. I put a series of Green blobs on kabobs so I would have several blanks to practice on.

 

The next one will be to Try to improve on the expression. Balancing the emotions of vigilant, but not worried. Calm, determined, ready. Maybe even a bit irritated, like - "don't try it" . I envision this character with a long oval face, athletic, but not overly defined in muscle tone.

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Kabob? ... Ohh, I just learned a new word; the stick kebabs come on. :-)

I think cartoons are a great reference source for facial expressions because they are exaggerated and stylized, but with a downside that much of the detail is in the mind of the viewer - your brain fills in the blanks to turn 2D into 3D.

For true 3D you need photographs, usually of real faces.

 

 

girl%20head%20sketch%20deviantart.jpg

 

 

BTW, do you add polymer clay to your Greenstuff? It's an annoying PITA when I'm trying to sculpt a "hard" shape but for soft organic shapes it sometimes helps.

And before it slips my mind,  a very basic technique that I wish I'd learned from the beginning - this is for any part of the miniature - is to "cut in" a line and then smooth out the two halves away from each other to define body parts.. errr.. I'll upload a picture tomorrow to explain what I'm talking about.

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I've got some grey sculpey lying around that I have generally used when making bases or terrain pieces, but haven't been in the habit of adding anything to the Green Stuff yet.  I will be playing with some other materials in the near future after playing with faces for a while.  

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A couple of thoughts on sculpting faces:

 

- Start with a bit of exaggerated draft in the muzzle.  Get your head shaped well, skull behind and muzzle below and a bit forward, from the front it should be an oval. With lubricated fingers, pull the muzzle out and forward, creating a bit of a wedge, with the edge of the wedge running from the future brow line to the chin.  This will give you the draft you need. As you cut in the nose and other features, this will get pushed back.  By starting with it too far out, you'll end up in the right position.

 

- Women tend to look more beautiful and "classic" with a bit more muzzle, with the lip out as far as the nose.  As the face gets pushed in it loses some femininity.

 

170947237-close-up-female-profile-gettyi Notice how her nose and mouth are completely in-front of her brow.

 

 

- If you want to sell "feminine" in a mini, keep it heart-shaped.  Watch your jaw line, it is really easy to have too much jaw and chin, making her manly.

 

- Find a mini or two whose face you love (I use a Werner Klocke and a DK Schubert) for reference.  Strive to get the features you see in the other mini in the one you are sculpting.  If it is not going right, pay attention to exactly where the differences are and develop a plan for fixing that, then start over.  On my first human (Coraline Thaddington), I had reworked her face 13 times before I was happy. Mary's face took 5 tries before I was happy. The Cyber Lady took two tries (her eyes are covered and I'm getting better).

 

I hope this helps.

 

Andy

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Hmm... normally I'd say taking a bit of wire, bending it over, and crimping the end so you have essentially a double-wide wire, and therefore a flat surface to index and grab onto. It makes holding a head in a given rotation easier, at least for me.

 

These are some good attempts, you're improving quite rapidly. Don't give up!

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..pull the muzzle out and forward, creating a bit of a wedge, with the edge of the wedge running from the future brown line to the chin.  This will give you the draft you need. As you cut in the nose and other features, this will get pushed back.  By starting with it too far out, you'll end up in the right position.

 

Andy

 

I had to think about that sentence, but now I get it, i's a brilliantly clever tip. I must try that tomorrow.

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A couple of thoughts on sculpting faces:

 

- Start with a bit of exaggerated draft in the muzzle.  Get your head shaped well, skull behind and muzzle below and a bit forward, from the front it should be an oval. With lubricated fingers, pull the muzzle out and forward, creating a bit of a wedge, with the edge of the wedge running from the future brow line to the chin.  This will give you the draft you need. As you cut in the nose and other features, this will get pushed back.  By starting with it too far out, you'll end up in the right position.

 

 

Let me make sure I am understanding correctly.  When you say to start by pulling the muzzle forward, I picture an imaginary T with the brow being the horizontal bar, and the nose to chin line being the vertical bar.  The putty is pinched forward of the forehead and from the top down the "wedge" would look like a V.  I would then work the putty into the appropriate shapes.

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A couple of thoughts on sculpting faces:

 

- Start with a bit of exaggerated draft in the muzzle.  Get your head shaped well, skull behind and muzzle below and a bit forward, from the front it should be an oval. With lubricated fingers, pull the muzzle out and forward, creating a bit of a wedge, with the edge of the wedge running from the future brow line to the chin.  This will give you the draft you need. As you cut in the nose and other features, this will get pushed back.  By starting with it too far out, you'll end up in the right position.

 

 

Let me make sure I am understanding correctly.  When you say to start by pulling the muzzle forward, I picture an imaginary T with the brow being the horizontal bar, and the nose to chin line being the vertical bar.  The putty is pinched forward of the forehead and from the top down the "wedge" would look like a V.  I would then work the putty into the appropriate shapes.

 

 

I think so, but as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.  I'm sculpting tonight and will do this on a toothpick and take pictures for you an post them here.  That way we can be certain of no confusion.  ::):  It is a hard thing to describe.

 

<Edit>

Here you go:

 

post-140-0-33184800-1426890736.jpg post-140-0-78639500-1426890736.jpg

 

post-140-0-21175400-1426890737.jpg post-140-0-69452300-1426890737.jpg

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