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Privateer Press: Warpborn Skinwalker

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Nice work. :) The cape is really cool. 

 

Unless you are very bored of the painting, I'd suggest giving the fur and teeth a dark wash, and a then a light dry-brush, to get out some shiny details. 

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nice work..  I've been toying with stripping and repainting mine.. which sucks because its only the armor that i think i've done horribly on

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I like the boldness of the colors. It feels like it could use a wash to add shadowing real quick. Nothing dramatic but it would add a bit more depth to the miniature.

Edited by Arc 724
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Your brush control was excellent on this guy, which is probably the most difficult element on something with so many details.  A little drybrushing or a wash on the fur would do wonders for the texture, but it's really easy. 

 

I think your painting skills are improving.  ^_^

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I like your colors thank you for sharing and I never noticed this guy had a collar before.

I barely realized he had a collar myself. It took me a few minutes while examining him while apart to realize there was a collar

 

I like the boldness of the colors. It feels like it could use a wash to add shadowing real quick. Nothing dramatic but it would add a bit more depth to the miniature.

Perhaps once I feel more comfortable I will add them in. For now I'm a bit afraid to wreck my work

 

Your brush control was excellent on this guy, which is probably the most difficult element on something with so many details.  A little drybrushing or a wash on the fur would do wonders for the texture, but it's really easy. 

 

I think your painting skills are improving.  ^_^

Drybrushing and washes are next on my list of things to master. Drybrushing will be harder as I tried to learn it years ago and just failed so it makes me nervous now to try again. But I need it for some color schemes I have in mind for other things

 

Great job, I really like the color scheme. That vibrant blue is really nice and goes well with the reddish brown.

Thank you I like vibrant color schemes. I thought a reddish brown would help the blue and purple have a better contrast. I very nearly went grey as his fur color instead.

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BE NOT AFRAID MY FRIEND! :) I would encourage you to Push your skills, challenge yourself and let go over any fear of messing up a figure. I only say that as the Troll I did took me WAY to long because I was unwilling to mess it up. I had to just take the chance and it turned out well!

Edited by Arc 724
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Oh I likely will, but I plan to practice on Bones minis as they are easily replaced if I make a really bad mistake. I need to master drybrushing, washes, and glazes for some color schemes I intend to do

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Oh I likely will, but I plan to practice on Bones minis as they are easily replaced if I make a really bad mistake. I need to master drybrushing, washes, and glazes for some color schemes I intend to do

 

You have great brush control it seems, so I am entirely certain you''ll master this in no time. :)

 

Dry brushing is not very difficult, so long as you wipe almost all the paint out of the brush before you start. 

 

Grab your largest, most bristled brush (drybrushing takes a toll on your brushes, so it's nice to use one you don't care much about) dip it in a light, -almost- white paint (tone it after the colour you're drybrushing), then wipe it vigorously on a newspaper until no visible paint comes out of it. Then you can stroke it very lightly over the miniature, preferably in the same direction (not so important when practicing) over and over again, applying more pressure for more effect as you go along. You'll see the effect right away. 

 

This method won't win you any competitions, but it's a good way to get started.

 

When speed painting this is what I do. I usually just grab the lightest skin tone I have (seems to work for every underlying colour), then brush randomly over all areas where I want the details to come out. If you add too much, you can lower the effect again with a wash of the underlying colour.

 

This guy has a good explanation of this technique: 

 

https://youtu.be/aRLsaXGHPfc

 

 

Also if you feel the washes are difficult because they 'stain' your other colours, water it down another 50%. It will not affect anything but the creases, even if you dunk the model completely.

 

This fellows' skin is painted entirely like this. Drybrushing lighter and lighter colours upon a dark-reddish brown basecoat

 

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/59950-02233-dantrag-of-heimdall/

Edited by Jaws
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He looks very nice. Thanks for the bigger pics so we can admire your work. :-)

Be not afraid, you can't improve on something if you don't practice. I don't dry brush much more than terrain anymore, but, after I think I've gotten most of the paint off, I do a few test swipes on some paper. For fur and hair, I find this technique useful. Lots of great instruction here but it's the hair part I'm referencing. It's towards the end.

 

http://www.reapermini.com/Thecraft/7

 

You can do eet.

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You've done a great job on him!!

 

More importantly than making others happy, did YOU have fun with it?

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