Jump to content

the best tools to make gap feeling seamless?


Recommended Posts

My current method is with clay shapers and green stuff with some sand paper at the end. I'll also add my clay shapers seem not firm enough. My problem is on certain models there are gaps and recesses that require a pointed or skinny rounded tip to get into and are not completely seamless when they dry so sanding must be done. the problem is without the right sanding method (currently just wrap paper around my sculpting tools) its impossible for me to accurately and seamlessly sand the joints/gaps down. i can damage the green stuff or more recently some of the models detail due to not having a method thats precise.

 

I'm just wondering what people use to create seamless filled gaps. Ive seen sanding sticks and such but my sand paper quickly absorbs some of the green stuff and i need new paper. additionally you cant really see if its seamless till you put some paint over it (thats how i do it...) so the paint also builds up on the fine paper fast.

 

could use some help and i always learn so much asking questions here lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use dental tools and my hobby knife for my initial GS gap filling, then use the clay shapers to smooth things over and feather it in.

 

But I'm really primitive with my GS work!

yeh i want it to be impossible to see where the gaps were. i can achieve this MOST of the time. the times i cant i dont even want to touch the model anymore... recently swapped a 116 dollar model to a local shop because some areas were too hard with my current method to make it flawless....

 

i dont own extra firm clay shapers but i own firm and imo they are NOT firm so im hesitant to buy extra firm doubting they will do the job i want.... wish a spot near me sold this stuff lol

Link to post
Share on other sites

 Try the extra firm clay shaper just to see if it works. There are also different-shaped points available, both round and chisel-shaped, so switching to a different shape may help.

 

 Other than that, I also use the side of a dental tool or a hobby knife for smoothing my edges. However, regardless of what you use, make sure it's well-lubricated so that it doesn't stick to the tool, but not enough that the putty won't stick to itself.

 

One thing I should point out is that if you're going to be sanding as a finishing step, you don't want to use greenstuff (i.e., kneadatite), but rather milliput or some other brand of putty that's easily sandable - greenstuff (or even brownstuff) doesn't really cure hard enough to be sandable. Diferent brands of putty have different properties, and people who do a lot of sculpting often mix them in varying ratios to achieve different effects. You can certainly use greenstuff to fill in the gaps, but you'd want to leave enough room on top to add something better suited to sanding. And you should look into getting some sanding sticks from Micromark or some other art supply place, since it's much easier to get the right angle and pressure with them, particularly in small spaces, than trying to wrap sand paper around a tool.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

i bought milliput once (black?) it was hard and odd and ended up not using it. was that the wrong one? also the green stuff DOES kinda seem sandable. i can mostly get it sanded well its just those few times i cant... but how on earth do you get a seamless green stuff gap fill? that seems impossible

Edited by gr33n
Link to post
Share on other sites

 I believe the milliput most folks use is either the yellow-and-grey, or the stuff that comes out white, which is the really fine stuff.

 

 Greenstuff can be sliced or scraped, but sanding it just doesn't work well. As far as getting smoothly blended edges with it, it's just a matter of practice, practice and practice, and figuring out how much pressure you need to apply to get it where you want it without pushing it completely out of shape. If your shapers aren't hard enough, try using the side of a dental pick or knife. I started seriously working with putty about four or five years ago, and still struggle with blending my edges.

 

 Also, you can touch up slightly flawed edges before or during painting by using things like brush-on sealer or matte medium to level off the edges. At the scale of 28mm minis, even thick paint and superglue (or multiple thin coats of either) can be used as sculpting materials.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Greensburg can be sanded, but it doesn't like to be; also, as you've noticed already, sanding GS really gums up your sanding tools. If you expect to sand, milliput will make that step easier.

 

I prefer GS over Milliput, though, especially for gap filling. I rarely sand, and do a few things to make it work as seamlessly as possible:

1. Lubricated tools. My life changed dramatically when I discovered that petroleum jelly works well on GS. I put a small dot of PJ on the back of my off hand, then swipe my shaping tool through it periodically. With this, once the GS is stuck to the mini, I can pull and smooth it very thin without having it stick to the tool. Just make sure you wash the join with dish soap after the GS cures and before you prime.

2. Texture. Build dragon scales, troll warts, chainmail, etc. into the GS A's you fill the gap. This distorts the shape and hides the seam. On perfectly smooth armor or skin this doesn't work, but most joins happen at a sleeve or other natural seam (not many manufacturers will break a model down the middle of a smooth breastplate).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I'll be the heavy and address the elephant in the room.

 

Why are you using so much greenstuff to cover everything up that you have to sand in the first place?

 

You might try filling the deepest parts of the gap first, then slowly build up until you are level with the surface of the piece, and then smooth even. A little practice and you should be able to get to the point where you are simply able to blend the surface of the filler onto the surface of the piece.

 

Sanding is something you will still, occasionally, need to do, but you shouldn't be flopping on so much filler that it's an agonizing chore. Apply less stuff.

 

As to sandable fillers, I agree greenstuff is not the most fun to sand. Yes, it can be done. But it's not ideal for the purpose. When I know I'm going to have to sand over a filled area, I use Magic Sculpt. It hardens more similarly to a hard plastic resin, and sands like such.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, I'll be the heavy and address the elephant in the room.

 

Why are you using so much greenstuff to cover everything up that you have to sand in the first place?

 

You might try filling the deepest parts of the gap first, then slowly build up until you are level with the surface of the piece, and then smooth even. A little practice and you should be able to get to the point where you are simply able to blend the surface of the filler onto the surface of the piece.

 

Sanding is something you will still, occasionally, need to do, but you shouldn't be flopping on so much filler that it's an agonizing chore. Apply less stuff.

 

As to sandable fillers, I agree greenstuff is not the most fun to sand. Yes, it can be done. But it's not ideal for the purpose. When I know I'm going to have to sand over a filled area, I use Magic Sculpt. It hardens more similarly to a hard plastic resin, and sands like such.

well sometimes the model has a "gap" where the two parts connect such as on the bloodthirsters bicep. its not a gap but its a line that shows up and you cant fill it only put something over it. would brush on sealer do that by itself? idk if it does that great

Link to post
Share on other sites

Another suggestion for consideration is mixing your Green Stuff with about 10% Sculpey.  In my recent attempts at sculpting, Cosmic recommended trying this mix and I found it to be much more pliable and less sticky.  It seemed to blend into other work better overall.  Your mileage may vary.  

 

I have also heard that Procreate is a more sandable putty than green stuff.  I don't have any yet, so this is not from personal experience.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...