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Noob asking for washing advice


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Hello all!

 

I'm fairly new to the hobby (mostly play soccer & jog) but I picked up a Reaper Bones LtPK back in November and now I'm an addict.

I need some advice for the griffin I'm working on. The wings are painted with a blend technique of light colors but I'm not sure what color to wash them or how (considering they blend). Maybe there is another technique I should try? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

I applied a black wash to the griffon body and dark green feather (pic not show as It was done later) and it came out kind of 'eh'. I know I will have to go back and touch up the dark green feathers, that is not a problem, but the griffon's body (dark brown) now has black splotches on it.

For the orange head I though about washing it in dark red or brown, and washing the yellow neck in orange or brown; and the light green I would wash with dark green.

Any advice?

 

Cheers!

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Washes / Glazes are a back and forth. I tend to base color, shade or wash in the shadows, then paint in my highlights. Lastly I may use a very thin glaze of the base coat color to unify the "color area". But until you get really familiar with the individual paints and how strong the pigment intensity and opacity of the coverage, there is going to be successes and failures. I will say as a general rule of thumb, paint colors that are light (pastel) in value tend to "chalk" when you overwork them or try to use them as a wash or glaze.

 

Looking at your wings, I think your green base coat could use another pass. 

 

I would define a wash as a heavy pigment but liquid consistency application (75% water, 25% paint). Where a glaze would be slightly tinted water (90% water, 10% paint or less).

Edited by DixonGrfx
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I don't think green ink on the green part will do much for you.  I would wash the yellow and orange parts with brown, that will really bring out the feathers but not obliterate the color. 

This, but it would help if we knew what you were washing with. Are you diluting paint, do you use ink, is it a professional wash?

 

I would stick to a pro wash or ink. You don't want to muddy up bright colors like this with a diluted paint wash. But if you're using ink, experiment first by diluting it for the first pass. Brown ink can "naturalize" orange and yellow, making them look more natural like real hair or feathers, but a concentrated brown ink can actually turn your orange brown and your yellow orange-ish.

 

You can darken your green ink/wash with a tiny dot of black ink, and that actually might help with washing the lighter green. It's the sort of effect that should look okay in real life (but for some reason doesn't photograph well).

 

Remember that a wash is not always a perfect fix. You'll probably have to go back and touch up areas with the base color before highlighting. So the issue with the body is really normal. Just go back in and touch up the areas that look too heavy. Washing can be messy. You'll have to learn to control it, but even then you will find yourself touching things up much of the time.

Edited by Bruunwald
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Washes / Glazes are a back and forth. I tend to base color, shade or wash in the shadows, then paint in my highlights. Lastly I may use a very thin glaze of the base coat color to unify the "color area". But until you get really familiar with the individual paints and how strong the pigment intensity and opacity of the coverage, there is going to be successes and failures. I will say as a general rule of thumb, paint colors that are light in value tend to "chalk" when you overwork them or try to use them as a wash or glaze.

 

Looking at your wings, I think your green base coat could use another pass. 

 

I would define a wash as a heavy pigment but liquid consistency application (75% water, 25% paint). Where a glaze would be slightly tinted water (90% water, 10% paint or less).

 

This, exactly! 

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One good advantage that washes have are that they are very wet and do not dry too quickly. I like to keep a second brush damp with water only nearby when applying a wash. If you see the wash start to pool in an undesired location or if it is too thick on an area (which can leave spots or rings), flick some off with your wet clean up brush. I sometimes go back and forth applying wash then brushing off the excess until it colors just the areas where I want it.

 

It is also important to let a washed area dry once you have the wash in the right areas before applying more paint. An area still damp from washing will want to run to your brush with fresh paint as if you were advertising free beer, getting all mixed into your paint and then you lost all the work you did to get the washed area just right. Waiting for washes & glazes to dry properly is why I have so many projects in process at once.

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Cheers! Thanks for all the feedback already. Lots of nuggets in there.

 

For washes I've only been diluting the paint with a 5:1 ratio of water to paint.  Sometimes it's hit, sometimes it's miss, seems to be more miss lately though.

Is there a specific color/wash anyone recommends for the yellow to deep orange feather blend? I should just apply a different wash carefully to each color?

My concern with the wings is after I've washed it then going back and applying a base coat, which I don't know how to do since this particular style is a blend, I would then be blending over the wash hence erasing the wash. Any tips on this?

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Cheers! Thanks for all the feedback already. Lots of nuggets in there.

 

For washes I've only been diluting the paint with a 5:1 ratio of water to paint.  Sometimes it's hit, sometimes it's miss, seems to be more miss lately though.

Is there a specific color/wash anyone recommends for the yellow to deep orange feather blend? I should just apply a different wash carefully to each color?

My concern with the wings is after I've washed it then going back and applying a base coat, which I don't know how to do since this particular style is a blend, I would then be blending over the wash hence erasing the wash. Any tips on this?

For these colors I would use a red-brown color and not make it too thick. Kind of a thinner wash, then see what it looks like dry. If there is still not enough definition, apply a second thin coat, or even a third if needed. Keep it kind of thin so you won't cover over the base coat completely on the raised areas.

 

One well defined and dry, take your base coat colors and thin them a bit. Apply them to their original areas carefully, keeping the paint from running into the recessed area of the wash.

 

Then you can highlight progessively smaller sections from there.

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Well, for me, I use washes to settle down into the details with a darker color. A wash typically doesn't have the opacity of coverage to work as your base color, that's why I paint my base color first, then wash to deepen the recessed details. Some times that can be enough if I am looking for a quick tabletop (I need this figure for tonight's game session) kind of paint job. 

 

In your case I would use as pure a red/crimson color I have (29802 HD Brilliant Red) because brown will dull the color vibrancy and reds normally take three to four coats to get good coverage. So in a wash that works to your advantage. It is going to shift your colors to a redder hue though, so be warned. ** your painting a whole section with the same wash so all of it will shift. And your base coat will still be there, just shifted with deeper recessed detail. So your hard work on the blended colors isn't pointless.  **  When you go back yellows can have even worse opacity problems than reds, but if you mix in a touch of white, the coverage is better. I would wash red, carefully drybrush a yellow + white to shift the color back towards your base color. And finally glaze with the base if it needs to be unified. 

 

I might even try using a red wash on the top side of the wings and a Brown Liner wash on the bottom sides. 

 

Whatever you try, be sure to let the paint fully dry before you go to the next step. I have ruined more than a few paint jobs by working to fast.

 

** added comments **

Edited by DixonGrfx
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If you have a spare mini with some texture on it, you could try out your base colors with various washes and see what works before you apply the colors to your griffon.  If you need to remove paint from a mini, a soak in Simple Green will let you start over.

 

Actually, anything solid with some texture could serve for a test, like some sandpaper that has been primed (don't use a good brush on this, though), an old plastic lid with raised letters, or anything similar. 

 

If you work directly on the griffon, start with a diluted wash in a limited area and get a feel for the color and how it works before you commit to a stronger wash.  I think experimenting is one of the most interesting things about painting.  It's fun to see how the different colors interact with one another in layers.

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