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Bones Satisfaction?


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For mold lines I've used a small, low-powered dremel.

Sounds like a really fast fix. As an alternative, the Alpha Abrasives sanding needles (designed for plastic) work really well. I think they sell direct on amazon if you can't find them locally. The blue medium grit and the white fine grit are the most useful needles.

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I also prefer the sanding needles over metal files on bones. The latter can be a bit to abrasive to the bones plasic in my opinion. I've found sanding needles locally at Hobby Lobby (don't forget the 40% off one item coupon) and Michaels.

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Some of the Bones I figures definitely had "melty" features, but even those painted up fairly well.  Even my "Alien Stone" (Ellen Stone, sans obvious nose, slightly converted to be a "alien space cowgirl") figure still had a slight bump where the nose should be, and I could have accented that with a bit of paint to make a passably cute little "anime-style" button nose, rather than just presenting her as flat-faced for giggles.  In many cases what seemed to be "featureless" would prove out once I actually put down some paint.  I think to some extent, any "melty" features were exaggerated by a super-slight soapy translucence to the Bones plastic, and adding some opaque paint quickly cures that problem.

 

With Bones II, I noticed an uptick in the quality of the figures.  The plastic feels more solid, and the details are more immediately evident.  I haven't painted quite as many yet as I have from the first Kickstarter, but I haven't stumbled across any that I felt were sub-standard.  If anything, I've actually noticed some with surprisingly fine details.

 

Maybe, MAYBE I'd go for the more expensive pewter if I were a professional-level painter and I wanted a showcase mini to enter into a contest, or for bragging rights for some display, but for most of the time, Bones plastic is the way to go.  Pewter minis have gotten to the point where what I once considered "boutique" prices are now the norm, and I'm loathe to pick up pewter minis to chop them up for conversions quite like I used to.  Mage Knight & Clix minis are no longer as pervasive as they used to be, and none of the local game stores (if they're even still in business, or even carrying game supplies anymore) break up boxes to sell "singles" like they did, say, circa 2008 or so.  And I boggle at how some miniatures wargame companies are converting their lines to plastic figures, and yet they're still demanding prices comparable to what they did for the pewter (or even higher).

 

Bones, however, has made it more plausible again for me to engage in "impulse" kitbashing.  I see some figure, think about how I could swap out the weapon and turn him into a steampunk character, or a superhero, or something else appropriate for whatever RPG campaign I'm into (I change genres a lot), and it's a WHOLE lot more likely that I'll give it a shot if the price range is $2-3 versus $7-10.  (Alas, I miss when I used to be able to get Mage Knight "commons" for 25 cents a pop ... but the paint they applied to the early releases of those figures practically *destroyed* surface features.  It takes "creative painting" to get them to look passable on the table, whereas Reaper minis start looking good when I've barely gotten past base coating, washes, and dry-brushing.  Detail matters!)

 

But the Bones "big" models open up whole new possibilities that were simply *never* practical for me before.  My games would never feature giants or other gargantuan opponents (at least, not as models), unless I happened to get a toy on clearance (I miss K-B Toy Liquidator outlet stores!), such as a McFarlane Dragon.  Now, I can put stuff on the table that would have been unfeasible even "back in the day" due to the sheer bulk of pewter involved.  :D

 

So, Bones Satisfaction?  I'm pretty happy with what we've got.  (And of course I'm looking forward to MORE.  ;)  )

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Glad I started this topic because I never knew about the sanding needles. Great advice and I will have to try those out.

 

Glad to see people doing those conversions too. On the skeleton lich/overlord guy whose face had soft details, one of my friends meekly pointed out, "Well, why don't you just cut the head off. I know you have like a billion skulls from when you painted up Warhammer undead." Such a simple thing never directly occurred to me.

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For mold lines I've used a small, low-powered dremel.

Sounds like a really fast fix. As an alternative, the Alpha Abrasives sanding needles (designed for plastic) work really well. I think they sell direct on amazon if you can't find them locally. The blue medium grit and the white fine grit are the most useful needles.

 

 

 

I've also found those needles at Hobby Lobby.

The ones I got from the lobby were poorly designed IMHO. Abrasive glued to the plastic rather than abrasive infused through the plastic.

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I've also found those needles at Hobby Lobby.

The ones I got from the lobby were poorly designed IMHO. Abrasive glued to the plastic rather than abrasive infused through the plastic.

 

I didn't know there were any differences; are they really that much better?

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I was in Hobby Lobby yesterday.  The have sanding sticks and sanding needles...  The sticks have two different materials on opposite sides and look to be made out of foamcore....  very flimsy.  The sanding needles are solid and ROUND!  I like the needles!

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For mold lines I've used a small, low-powered dremel.

Sounds like a really fast fix. As an alternative, the Alpha Abrasives sanding needles (designed for plastic) work really well. I think they sell direct on amazon if you can't find them locally. The blue medium grit and the white fine grit are the most useful needles.

 

I've been following this discussion with particular interest as I would like to find an easier way to remove mold lines. I wonder if those of you who have used the sanding needles, could you please find out what grit (or what grit range) seems to work the best. I went and looked for "blue medium grit and white fine grit" and wasn't able to get a definitive conclusion that I was looking at the right product. What grit number is medium and fine (even an approximation would be helpful)?

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For mold lines I've used a small, low-powered dremel.

Sounds like a really fast fix. As an alternative, the Alpha Abrasives sanding needles (designed for plastic) work really well. I think they sell direct on amazon if you can't find them locally. The blue medium grit and the white fine grit are the most useful needles.

 

I've been following this discussion with particular interest as I would like to find an easier way to remove mold lines. I wonder if those of you who have used the sanding needles, could you please find out what grit (or what grit range) seems to work the best. I went and looked for "blue medium grit and white fine grit" and wasn't able to get a definitive conclusion that I was looking at the right product. What grit number is medium and fine (even an approximation would be helpful)?

 

 

I have both 150 grit and 240 grit, I use it like normal sanding of wood: Start out with the lower grit to remove the harder mold lines very gently and then smooth it out with the 240 grit. 320 is also available, but I don't have any of those as the 240 seem to do the job. 

 

Here's what they look like:

150/240/320 grits

alpha-abr_needles-boxart_t.jpg

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