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Watering down paint too much?


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I fell into the trap of "too thin" paint when I came back into painting. 

 

The problem is NOT paint too thin (or us needing to thin it to dirty water status) but the amount of paint on the brush.

 

The thinner your paint, the less your stroke is going to be visible, generally. But even if the water is just thinned 1:1 (in RMS case), it is good enough for blending most of the time. 

 

Problem, again, is too much paint and paint pooling over the surface.

 

My breakthrough moment this year was when a pro-painter told me to hold the side of my loaded brush to a paper towel (not the tip! all the hairs!) 1 full second, then turn, repeat for the other "side" of the brush hairs. Then paint. At that moment, right there, it clicked how little paint is enough to paint. Thin paint makes that little paint able to flow off the tip... it you touch the tip of the brush after removing all that paint and it does not leave a tiny dot, then it requires a bit more water.

 

All of the above, in my humble experience. Hope it helps!

 

Edit: my English is so bad at times, I wonder how you guys understand me at all. Sorry.

Your English is better than many who are born here.

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I fell into the trap of "too thin" paint when I came back into painting. 

 

The problem is NOT paint too thin (or us needing to thin it to dirty water status) but the amount of paint on the brush.

 

The thinner your paint, the less your stroke is going to be visible, generally. But even if the water is just thinned 1:1 (in RMS case), it is good enough for blending most of the time. 

 

Problem, again, is too much paint and paint pooling over the surface.

 

My breakthrough moment this year was when a pro-painter told me to hold the side of my loaded brush to a paper towel (not the tip! all the hairs!) 1 full second, then turn, repeat for the other "side" of the brush hairs. Then paint. At that moment, right there, it clicked how little paint is enough to paint. Thin paint makes that little paint able to flow off the tip... it you touch the tip of the brush after removing all that paint and it does not leave a tiny dot, then it requires a bit more water.

 

All of the above, in my humble experience. Hope it helps!

 

Edit: my English is so bad at times, I wonder how you guys understand me at all. Sorry.

Your English is better than many who are born here.

 

 

 Sadly, it really is.

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Thanks. Reading a lot helps, any language. Sometimes I wonder who my own friends make such mistakes in Spanish... make your young ones read, teach them to enjoy it, It helps growth in so many ways!

 

Being a foreigner I am more conscious about the spelling, usually, but tend to fail more at grammar because of Spanish-structure.

 

Anyway, I try to get my point across. People get me and that's the important  :blush:

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Also when you thin paint, it behaves differently on the brush. The brush head will wick up a ton more thinned paint. Wipe it against your palette or even touch it against the side of a paper towel or damp sponge. You should be able to paint a stroke with clean edges if the brush is loaded (and unloaded) correctly, even if you have super thin paint. A lot of guides/teachers talk about thinning paint, but we don't always remember to tell you you have to get some of that thinned paint off the brush to be able to control it!

 

 

As someone who NEVER saw other painters do their thing, and less more good painters, and with almost no video showing the palette / loading off of paint on camera, that was the one crucial bit of information that I was missing. 

 

I kept getting tide marks, pools, and wondering WHY people could paint so smooth, and have paint dry almost instantly... I will worship Scott Hockley for all eternity.

 

 

I'm sure it's not much of a consolation, but I think the reason we forget to mention it is that it quickly becomes _that_ automatic. You dip brush in the paint, and then you wick or wipe it against a paper towel, damp sponge, your thumb, whatever you're holding the mini with, and only then does it touch the figure. I'm guessing if you walk down artist row at ReaperCon and watch us, the vast majority will do it one way or another, and barely be conscious of it.

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Also when you thin paint, it behaves differently on the brush. The brush head will wick up a ton more thinned paint. Wipe it against your palette or even touch it against the side of a paper towel or damp sponge. You should be able to paint a stroke with clean edges if the brush is loaded (and unloaded) correctly, even if you have super thin paint. A lot of guides/teachers talk about thinning paint, but we don't always remember to tell you you have to get some of that thinned paint off the brush to be able to control it!

 

 

As someone who NEVER saw other painters do their thing, and less more good painters, and with almost no video showing the palette / loading off of paint on camera, that was the one crucial bit of information that I was missing. 

 

I kept getting tide marks, pools, and wondering WHY people could paint so smooth, and have paint dry almost instantly... I will worship Scott Hockley for all eternity.

 

 

I'm sure it's not much of a consolation, but I think the reason we forget to mention it is that it quickly becomes _that_ automatic. You dip brush in the paint, and then you wick or wipe it against a paper towel, damp sponge, your thumb, whatever you're holding the mini with, and only then does it touch the figure. I'm guessing if you walk down artist row at ReaperCon and watch us, the vast majority will do it one way or another, and barely be conscious of it.

 

 

I'm no prolific artist, but I go through more paper towels by doing just that.

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My experience with Reaper paints and water is, that I can't work at with it mixed together, even if the brush is still wet I get problems. I do not get this issue with Vallejo paints, which I water down normally a little bit. This doesn't mean I do not like the reaper paints, but if I do need to check always my pinsel first if it is dry, before I start painting.

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My experience with Reaper paints and water is, that I can't work at with it mixed together, even if the brush is still wet I get problems. I do not get this issue with Vallejo paints, which I water down normally a little bit. This doesn't mean I do not like the reaper paints, but if I do need to check always my pinsel first if it is dry, before I start painting.

Pinsel = brush?

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My experience with Reaper paints and water is, that I can't work at with it mixed together, even if the brush is still wet I get problems. I do not get this issue with Vallejo paints, which I water down normally a little bit. This doesn't mean I do not like the reaper paints, but if I do need to check always my pinsel first if it is dry, before I start painting.

 

That seems very odd since Reaper paints are designed to be thinned. Can you describe that problem, I'm not sure I understand.

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