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Shaking Bottles of Paint


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Has anyone successfully tested some version of using a clothes dryer? I've got a bunch of old paint I'd like to give a friend, but I don't really have time to individually Vortex every bottle...

 

I think that would be a really bad idea if any of the bottles opened up.

 

Ron

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Has anyone successfully tested some version of using a clothes dryer? I've got a bunch of old paint I'd like to give a friend, but I don't really have time to individually Vortex every bottle...

 

Perhaps packing them into a tupperware with a washcloth or some fabric to keep the bottles from banging around individually too much and running the dryer for a few minutes with no heat? Lots of tumbling action going on, I would think it would work. I've dried tennis shoes before, I don't imagine a soft-ish plastic container would do any damage to the dryer. Perhaps putting all the bottles into a baggie just in case one does pop open.

 

If I had a dryer, I would totally give this a try right now. However, I'm not quite willing to test this in one of our apartment's communal dryers, just in case....  :blush:

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

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I borrowed one vortex shaker from my mum's lab, unused ever, sitting there from new since 2004. I don't think they will miss it (but I will return it shortly because it is not mine)... I will show you pics later but oh boy it is awesome!

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I borrowed one vortex shaker from my mum's lab, unused ever, sitting there from new since 2004. I don't think they will miss it (but I will return it shortly because it is not mine)... I will show you pics later but oh boy it is awesome!

 

They do a great job!  Just need to borrow it once in awhile to give them all a good shake.

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I did not paint at that place this weekend, but I spent some time trying it out. It worked quite fine except for some very dense Scale75's. 

 

It was also manufactured locally so I am also thinking about unscrewing the cover and taking a peep inside  :devil:

 

Problem with the borrowing is that it is part of the science college's stuff... you know, the kind of equipment they don't use but is under inventory, they can't sell it off so its fate is to rot and break before they just dispose of it in the trash. A true pity.

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Has anyone successfully tested some version of using a clothes dryer? I've got a bunch of old paint I'd like to give a friend, but I don't really have time to individually Vortex every bottle...

DONE!

 

I went ahead and tried the clothes dryer after I had a load of laundry this morning.

 

So I dried my clothes normally, without the paint, so I could use the full heat. Once it was done, I had 11 bottles separated in two lockable plastic containers (7 and 4 bottles) that I threw in with the clothes, and put the dryer in "fluff/cool down" mode for 10 minutes.

 

Because of the noise it was making by bouncing around so hard, I stopped the dryer after maybe five minutes. Mind you, it's not *that* loud. But there is a lot of banging inside the drum that is probably not recommended for extended periods if you use big containers. If I had multiple smaller containers, or more laundry padding, it may not have been as loud

 

Conclusion: It works! All eleven bottles seemed thoroughly mixed. Not sure how often I'd do it (though it would be during laundry) because of the cacophony. So be considerate and don't do it when other people are nearby (i.e. no witnesses!)

 

 

P.S. Yes, I should've done a "before-after" photo shoot.

Edited by Cranky Dog
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Just my 2cp:

 

I have a Robart shaker. Initially, i was a little bit upset at the price tag (I found mine on eBay, and want to say I paid 50 bucks for it.)

 

On the few occasions that I haven't used it, and shook things myself manually, I have sorta regretted it. It seems that using this just leads to more consistant integration and colors. The thing works, and just seems to do a better job shaking paint than I ever do (on a painting kit that is 85% Vallejo, and thick.)

 

Now, I am not going to say I am so incredibly lazy as to get a tired arm from shaking paint, but when you are going through your "yearly test," being able to quickly shake 200 bottles of paint and not wearing out your arm is an absolute bonus.

 

I did finally wear out one of the rubber bands, 2 years after buying the thing, but replacements were easy to find, and relatively cheap.

 

Its not a neccessity, but it really is a genuine "very nice to have" that will pay for itself over time.

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Robert brought a Vortex Mixer to ReaperCon, and was so kind as to show me how it works and let me try it out. Very convincing demonstration! I probably didn't get the best deal, since I'm not an expert Ebayer, but last week I got one that wasn't too beat up looking, and which included the touch option. So you leave it on, but it doesn't do anything until you hold a bottle on the pad.

 

I always leave mine plugged in and ready to go.  But I've got the attachment on mine that let's you put up to 8 bottles in it at once and then I just flip the toggle switch.  When I pull some new paint out, I just put them in there first and they are shaken, not stirred.

 

 

Is there a recommended setting? Or does it just work whatever you do?

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I just got a vortex mixer of ebay and I love it!  It doesn't have the attachment to hold bottles but I have an idea of how to fabricate something myself.  The Vortex is way quieter than the Robert shaker I have so I can use it without waking up the family.  It seems to do a really good job of shaking the paint (bear in mind that I have only had it for two days now) and has a footprint about the same size.  I tested in on reaper paints and some scale75 paint and it mixed them nicely.  I didn't play with any of the speed settings.  I just turned it up to 11 and went to town.  If it continues to work as nicely as it does now, I am hooked.  I love the touch option!  With out that, I doubt that I would be as in love with this device as I am.

 

The only downside was the price.  I put offers into on several of them and ended up getting one that was in my price range.  I think the key is to decide what you are willing to spend and just keep looking for one that fits for you.

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Robert brought a Vortex Mixer to ReaperCon, and was so kind as to show me how it works and let me try it out. Very convincing demonstration! I probably didn't get the best deal, since I'm not an expert Ebayer, but last week I got one that wasn't too beat up looking, and which included the touch option. So you leave it on, but it doesn't do anything until you hold a bottle on the pad.

 

I always leave mine plugged in and ready to go.  But I've got the attachment on mine that let's you put up to 8 bottles in it at once and then I just flip the toggle switch.  When I pull some new paint out, I just put them in there first and they are shaken, not stirred.

 

 

Is there a recommended setting? Or does it just work whatever you do?

 

 

I start mine on the low setting and then crank it up faster once it gets vortexing the paints.  Then back down to low and off to remove them.

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I start mine on the low setting and then crank it up faster once it gets vortexing the paints.  Then back down to low and off to remove them.

 

 

Thanks for your reply.

 

Is "vortexing the paints" different / more specific than "the device is turned on and operating"? I hope I am not being too obtuse here, but:

1) I have one of these things.

2) I have the attachment/insert that can accept 8 bottles.

3) When I tested it out, I could not tell what was happening inside the bottles.

 

I have no lab experience, but it did occur to me that simply spinning ("centrifuging", I guess) and actually mixing would be two different things. Then someone else mentioned that here.

 

Maybe what I'm really asking is: "Is there any way that I could actually do it wrong?" Or is it newbie-proof (even though I got my device used -- like everyone else -- and therefore have no manual, to go along with my complete lack of lab experience)?

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I start mine on the low setting and then crank it up faster once it gets vortexing the paints.  Then back down to low and off to remove them.

 

 

Thanks for your reply.

 

Is "vortexing the paints" different / more specific than "the device is turned on and operating"? I hope I am not being too obtuse here, but:

1) I have one of these things.

2) I have the attachment/insert that can accept 8 bottles.

3) When I tested it out, I could not tell what was happening inside the bottles.

 

I have no lab experience, but it did occur to me that simply spinning ("centrifuging", I guess) and actually mixing would be two different things. Then someone else mentioned that here.

 

Maybe what I'm really asking is: "Is there any way that I could actually do it wrong?" Or is it newbie-proof (even though I got my device used -- like everyone else -- and therefore have no manual, to go along with my complete lack of lab experience)?

 

 

All my device does is "vortex".  So when you turn it on, that's just what it does.  You can then turn up the speed at which it vortexes.

 

It doesn't spin around, I believe that is what a centrifuge would be doing (not a lab person at all either).

 

So if you have a vortex shaker, I don't think you can do it wrong.  It just vortexes.  Mine has no other settings other than to turn it on / off and to crank the speed up and down.  And I can tell immediately if I put in a bottle that is obviously separeted (you can see different colors at the top than the bottom).  As soon as I put it in and turn it on the color at the top of the bottle immediately changes!  My father even commented on how quickly it mixed up to the naked eye.  Normally I get out my 4 or 5 colors I'm using and put them in for a minute or so on high.  Then as I use them later I might give them a quick hand shake before getting some drops out onto the palette.

 

I also plan to shake all my paint every 6 months or so perhaps given it is easy to do with the device in front of the TV.

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