Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
ub3r_n3rd

Faithful Stand - ReaperCon Diorama (03710, 03711, 03600, and 60025)

Recommended Posts

If this were chocolate it would be eaten by now... !!!!!!!!!!

Delicious !

Exquisite,

and Wow, well executed !

Great Diorama Ub3r !

Congrats.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oops, I need to take a full side on pic of it lol

 

ETA: there we go, fixed it.

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

very nicely done. I love the composition of the whole scene. Since you asked for C, C the only thing that needs work to me is the base of the Goddess. I think you need to carry the weather down more or add more leaves and ivy, other then that awesomeness achieved. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All of the minis come off?  Perhaps a shot of them separate.

 

Well done and laid out sirrah.  Glad you reduced it from your original.  Think it would have been too crowded as mentioned.

 

The whole thing is very nicely painted.  Congrats on the medal.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good work! The underbrush in particular looks great.

Thank you! The underbrush is dried tea leaves and then some birch seeds (as leaves). 

 

 

very nicely done. I love the composition of the whole scene. Since you asked for C, C the only thing that needs work to me is the base of the Goddess. I think you need to carry the weather down more or add more leaves and ivy, other then that awesomeness achieved. 

 

 

Gracias! Good ideas, they are appreciated.  ^_^

 

 

All of the minis come off?  Perhaps a shot of them separate.

 

Well done and laid out sirrah.  Glad you reduced it from your original.  Think it would have been too crowded as mentioned.

 

The whole thing is very nicely painted.  Congrats on the medal.

 

Only the Paladin is removable. That's why I had to take pics like I did.

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a great piece.

 

I love the painting on the minis as well as the terrain.

The undergrowth is indeed wonderful.

 

The setting is a great story too.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was one of the judges on this one along with Michael and Aaron Lovejoy. I'm still trying to recover from a severe case of con crud at this point so let me know if something doesn't make sense.

 

This one passes my first criteria of story in that I can read all the visual clues and figure out what's going on. Huge plus in dioramas because if I can't figure out the story then its pretty much failed. And writing the story on the card doesn't cut it, I have to be able to see it, that's what a diorama is all about after all.

 

And I already manged to post this without finishing it.

 

The first place it loses it and I'm sure Michael pointed it out is that the Ogres are not looking at the Paladin, their gaze is directed off scene somewhere which means that you have already lost some focus, granted everyone can still figure out what's going on but that means I have "lines" that are leading me away from the focal point of the action.

 

After that it pretty much comes down to presentation, which overall is pretty good. I do feel its a bit to large and you could probably move the Ogre on the far left much closer in maybe as much as 3-4". I'm a firm believer in smaller is better, the reason for that is it helps keep everything focused and you don't have large areas that you feel you need to fill which often leads us to create things that distract from the action. The tree and the wall really help frame everything quite nicely which is good. You need something to stop the eye from leaving your scene and these worked quite well.

 

While the undergrowth looks great, you still need to apply highlights and shadows, while I know you were coming down to the wire on this one this is the kind of thing that can really give a diorama that "Wow" factor. Other places that could use improvement would be the tree itself which is a rather monotone brown and lacks bark. I know everyone was raving about it but it could still use a lot of work especially since as a view block people are going to look at it a lot. On the other end your wall is also pretty monotone. A few blocks that were painted some slightly different colors would have added a lot of interest to a fairly dominant portion of the scene.

 

I'm going to go back and collapse now.

Edited by Heisler
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was one of the judges on this one along with Michael and Aaron Lovejoy. I'm still trying to recover from a severe case of con crud at this point so let me know if something doesn't make sense.

 

This one passes my first criteria of story in that I can read all the visual clues and figure out what's going on. Huge plus in dioramas because if I can't figure out the story then its pretty much failed. And writing the story on the card doesn't cut it, I have to be able to see it, that's what a diorama is all about after all.

 

I'm happy that you could tell what the story was without a card to tell it to you.  ^_^

 

I'd actually love to hear all your feedback/critiques on it when you get the time and feel better. Hit me with everything that I should've done in your opinion to make it better so that I can learn and work on getting Silvers and possibly Golds in future Cons. No need for it to be a PM either, I want others to see what the judges think/thought of it.

Edited by ub3r_n3rd
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Dan S
      Dan's Build Journal #2
      Ruined Keep Edition
       
      Finished Project Photos:
       
      My Other Build Journals:
       
      For those who followed my Halfling/Hobbit home build journal (Link here), you will know that I recently set myself the goal of building a series of display pieces throughout the year, to serve as scenic backdrops when photographing my miniatures.  Maintaining a build journal is my way of holding myself to account (I have a bad habit of starting and not finishing things). I took a short break following my last build to catch up on some unpainted miniatures, but I am now ready to get cracking on my next large project, an ancient ruin.
       
      Future planned projects include:
       
      Sewers Dungeon Adventurers Camp Industrial Complex Spaceship Graveyard Urban Trenches  
      With the Ancient Ruined Keep project looking to be the most complicated of bunch I have chosen to start that now, as I will be returning to work in a week or so and will no longer have a lot of free time, however after this project I have no set order planned, so if anyone has a preference as to what I should start next then I am happy to accommodate.
       
      Stage 1 - Casting the stonework.
       
      For this project I am going to be using 'Hirst Arts' blocks.  For those unfamiliar with Bruce Hirst he produces silicone molds that can be used to cast a wide range of highly detailed modular terrain blocks which can be glued together in endless configurations and designs.  The molds I will be using in this project are #704 and #708 (ignore the 3rd mould in the picture, I mixed up too much stone and so filled another none related mould to set aside for a future project as to not waste it).  In my last build journal I used Plaster of Paris to cast the small rockface, this time because of the size and potential weight of the build I opted for Dental Stone which is similar to Plaster but sets harder and is much more durable.
       
      I suspect given the size of the project, it is going to take me at least a day or two to finish casting enough blocks, so here are a few screen shots of the blocks to give you an idea of what I will be working with (its basically glorified stone lego for diorama builders ).
       
       


    • By Skrill
      Hi everyone,
       
      Here is my vignette featuring the Blacksting Wyvern hunting down a 500MD helicopter.

       
      This is a little project I had fun with recently.
      i painted the Blacksting Wyvern from Bones a bit more than a year back and was quite happy with it collecting dust on my shelf (original post: https://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/86236-blacksting-wyvern-speed-paint).
      Then, I stumbled across a 1/48 helicopter model I had almost forgotten about. 1/48th scale does fit nicely with 28mm heroic scale.

       
      The creatives juice started flowing and I decided to make a surprise encounter between the modern warfare machine and the legendary beast.

      I experimented as well with epoxy resin + food coloring for water, tree bark (for rocks), a couple of random 3D-printed broken statues/rubbles and toilet paper plaster for the terrain. I didn't have a clear acrylic rod for the flight stand, but wooden dowel painted black blends OK.
      I also forgot how much fun it is to build and paint plastic models. It is both similar and very different from miniatures painting.
       
      I'm quite happy with the result even though I could have been neater on a few places and it is a bit big for my light box.
      C&C appreciated
       
       

    • By Dan S
      Dan's Build Journal #3
      Dank Sewers
       
       
       Latest WIP Picture:
       
        My Other Build Journals:
       
       
      First off the elephant in the room.  I appreciate I have literally just started 'Build Journal #2 - Ancient Ruins' which has only had one post so far, unfortunately that's had to go on temporary hold.  My last piece of foamboard isn't quite big enough to support the planned build and I do not have anything else strong enough to hold it and so I've had to order some.
       
      Rather than waste my last weekend off work, I figured I'd start work on one of my smaller quicker builds which should keep me occupied until the foamboard arrives.  This ones going to be a photo backdrop of a dark, dirty, fantasy sewer system.
       
      Preparing the Masonry
      For this build I am going to be using 'Hirst Arts Mold #343 - Underground Brick' and casting the blocks from Dental Stone which is a lot more durable than plaster.  Luckily I had prepared a large batch of these blocks at the same time I was making blocks for my Ancient Ruins build and so I was ready to go straight away.  The first job was creating a back wall for the project, which took around an hour to both experiment and dry-fit something I was happy with and then glue it all together.  At present the wall has some pretty obvious and unsightly 'seam lines' where you can tell it is just a bunch of blocks glued together, that will be fixed later.
       
       
       
      Laying the Foundation
       
      For the foundation I used a sheet of 6mm foamcore, which I then cut to the length of the wall.  I then measured and cut a block of polystyrene using a hotwire tool which will serve as the walkway above the sewage water.  I glued a second piece of foamcore (this was the offcut from the first piece I had cut to size) and glued that to the back, this is to give the wall a bit more support once glued to the base.  I quickly tested the fit (but didn't yet glue the wall to the base)
       

       
       
      Preparing the Walkway
       
      The walkway was made out of Sculpy, a modelling clay that needs baking to harden.  I used a Greenstuff World texture roller to imprint a stone brick floor pattern into the clay, test fitted it to the polystyrene and then cut it to the right size.  The flooring was then baked and glued to the polystyrene once cooled (This shrunk slightly in the oven, if you look at the next picture the wall slightly overhands the path now).  I added a brick wall against the the polystyrene where the water will eventually flow, but the height was just off, to fix this I glued some old foam bricks I had laying around to the edge.  These are a lot bigger than the bricks of the wall and floor, however as edging pieces they seem to work well, I textured these with a scumpled up ball of tinfoil.  Finally I attempted to fill the gaps and seamlines where the blocks meet with some home made spackle.  I rubbed dry powdered plaster into all the gaps and then used a soft haired makeup brush to gently dust away the excess which had gathered and filled in the detail of the brick work, once cleaned up I spritzed the entire thing with water to soak into the cracks and dried plaster.  I may need to do this a second time, but its already looking a lot better. 
       

       
      Creating the Waterway.
       
      To finish up the waterway, I built another wall section and placed it a few inches out from the first, I then cut away the excess foamboard to keep the build neat and compact.  As the clay floor I'd made ended up a little uneven in places, the back wall no longer sat flat and there were gaps as a result, especially under the final buttress (not that obvious at the angle I photographed it above, but it was quite a large gap).  I ended up filing all these gaps with some sculptamold, I also made some small debris piles around a few of the buttresses.  To finish off the whole model was primed white ready for painting.
       

       
       
       
    • By Dan S
      Dan's Build Journal #1
      Halfling/Hobbit Hole
       
       
      Completed Project Photos:
       
       My Other Build Journals:
       
       
      Greetings all!
       
      I recently undertook the task of creating several display pieces to serve as scenic backdrops when photographing my miniatures, however being the procrastinator that I am, I have instead found myself with an ever growing pile of unfinished projects.  In an effort to break this cycle I am no longer allowing myself to start new projects until my current one is complete. I figure a progress journal would be a great way to hold myself accountable, and hopefully by sharing my build process even inspire others into giving diorama building a try.
       
      Anyway, without further ado here is my current work in progress, a good old fashioned hobbit hole.  I managed to pick up a cheap and incomplete resin kit (front wall and chimney) on Ebay a while back.  I painted it about a month ago, and it has sat on my desk gathering dust ever since.  Today I finally started to put in some real work on the build.
       
      29/05/20  -  Laying the foundation.
       
      The first job was to lay the foundations of the build.  I hot glued thick polystyrene sheets to an old photo frame and then cut them to shape using a hot wire cutter.  The challenging part was then getting the front wall to fit convincingly into the hill, being an incomplete kit, the front wall was completely rectangular and just didn't look right no matter how I positioned it. To fix this, I measured out and then cut some thick card stock in to triangular sections, and then cut some thinner strips to match the wooden beams on the front of the house.  I then glued these to the house so that the walls now followed the contours of the hill more organically.  I also made some curtains using some old fabric (The original kit has holes for windows and I needed to hide the polystyrene behind them).
       
      Next I mixed up some Sculptamold and started to cover the polystyrene and base of the picture frame before adding some rocks that I had cast previously with Plaster of Paris (They are probably hard to make out in the photo, as they blend in with the white sculptamold, but once painted they should stand out nicely).  With that done I decided to call it a day, and give the sculptamold the night to fully dry before adding any paint.  And that is pretty much how I spent my Friday afternoon.
       
      Apologies for the poor picture quality, I took the photo during the evening in poor lighting with my ancient phone camera.  I'll get some better pictures up once I have something more substantial to share.
       

    • By Maledrakh
      What is a faux-prehistoric setting without Cavemen? The stereotypical fur-clad, monosyllabic unwashed barbarian that whacks a woman over the head with a club and then drags her by the hair into a cave?
      Or at least, sporting the "cave man" look that was popularised in The Flintstones and The Far Side.
      The reason these types are prehistoric lies in the name. Pre-history, as in "before recorded time". Which really is most of time.
      We don't really know all that much about prehistoric man other than what can be gleaned through archeology. We do know that there existed several different sub-species of humans concurrently up to about 50.000 years ago. Neanderthals would be one such sub-species, the Hobbits (Homo Florensis) another.
      Then we (or something) killed off all the others. Some evidence of interspecies breeding is still to be found in our modern DNA.
       
       
      #628-631 These were only shown as silhouettes in the KS.

      From left to right: Shaman. clubber, spearman, archer.
      These are technologically advanced cavemen, as shown by their use of the bow.
       

      The Shaman. I call him Barney. He succeeded in the Quest for Fire.
       

      The clubber, Thag Simmons. He will be known to posterity by the manner of his demise. (Should have stayed clear of the tail end of that Stegosaur.)
       
       

      Fred, the spearman. Used stones of flint to make a sharp spearhead.
       

      Archie the bowman. His right hand strategically placed to hide his embarrassing lack of arrows from the others.
       
      These were simple and fun to do in regular paints on a black undercoat.
       

      I come in search of the answer to the Riddle of Steel! What do you know about it?
       
      These minis were finished June 14th 2020.
       
      44086 Black Bear Tribe Cavemen (4)
      Bones 4 kickstarter, delivered 2019
      Reaper Miniatures
      Sculpted by Bobby Jackson
      Made in Bones Black PVC
      available from reapermini.com
  • Who's Online   12 Members, 2 Anonymous, 34 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...