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Jasonator

RBG - Valda The Black Hearted

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Like all Sculpts by Tre Manor, Valda was a delight to paint.

Very challenging vixen.  I started experimenting with the gray

scale photography on this last RBG Barbarian.  I really learned

a great deal from this one.  I have based her to compliment the

other barbarians that I have done from this series.

 

C and C are always welcomed, leave me a comment as to what you think.

 

Here's Valda The Black Hearted.

I have Modified the post as  I was requested to get a better look at her face.

I managed to get a photo of her face with my cell phone. 

Like looking at my painting under a microscope !

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Edited by Jasonator
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She looks really great, Jay!

 

Critiques:

1- I'd say up the contrast a few little spots of a higher highlight of the red she's wearing.

2- Age the skulls more, hit their shadows with some more brownish yellow.

3- Try adding a dark wash to the grass' shadowy areas (this one is new to me as well), I was told the same thing at RCon by Clever Crow (Michael Proctor).

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She looks really great, Jay!

 

Critiques:

1- I'd say up the contrast a few little spots of a higher highlight of the red she's wearing.

2- Age the skulls more, hit their shadows with some more brownish yellow.

3- Try adding a dark wash to the grass' shadowy areas (this one is new to me as well), I was told the same thing at RCon by Clever Crow (Michael Proctor).

Thanks Ub3r !

1 is a bit tough, I don't think I can make that red any redder, I don't think I want pink,.. hmmmm

2. The skulls .. Yeah.. I can see doing some more darks on them.

3 is out of this park.. Never would have thought of that one !  Have to try that for the future...made a note.

You input is always valued !!

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No problem, Jay!

 

A good way to go with the red is to actually highlight up to pink or orange and then glaze with red to tone it back down. A lot of people actually use the Reaper "Clear Red" for this purpose, so it might be a good little investment since red is one of the tougher ones.

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I second what uber said also you can mix rosy highlight with brilliant red to highlight then cover with clear red, all reaper paints. And Jason you did a great job on her

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No problem, Jay!

 

A good way to go with the red is to actually highlight up to pink or orange and then glaze with red to tone it back down. A lot of people actually use the Reaper "Clear Red" for this purpose, so it might be a good little investment since red is one of the tougher ones.

Wow, I've missed these paints !

I am going to have to add those to my Birthday list of goodies.

I actually never picked up on the "Clear Colors"... and Clear Red sound FANTASTIC !

I have to remember to take the optivisor off sometimes, and see what is happening in our world !

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This sculpt looks nice, your paint work really brings out her details. I would love to see a clearer shot of her face it looks like you did a great job on it. 

 

Aside from what Ub3r said the rock just doesn't sit well with me. It's a bit too large for its placement and needs some paint to make it look more natural. 

 

Lovely job overall its  always a joy to see your minis.

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I like and agree with all of the comments you have gotten so far Jay.   The red highlighted with orange works for me usually.  If you don't have an orange just mix a bright yellow into your red (slowly) and do light layering adding a touch of yellow with each layer until you get the contrast you want.

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This sculpt looks nice, your paint work really brings out her details. I would love to see a clearer shot of her face it looks like you did a great job on it. 

 

Aside from what Ub3r said the rock just doesn't sit well with me. It's a bit too large for its placement and needs some paint to make it look more natural. 

 

Lovely job overall its  always a joy to see your minis.

Thanks Marsya;

I chose that little pebble for the design on it, thinking it would add interest, and that is its natural color.

This mini is 25mm and I took another photo.

I had to resort to my cell phone to get close enough !

I posted another photo of the face as you requested in the photos above.

I needed a 0000 brush to get to those eyes.

 

Edited by Jasonator
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I like and agree with all of the comments you have gotten so far Jay.   The red highlighted with orange works for me usually.  If you don't have an orange just mix a bright yellow into your red (slowly) and do light layering adding a touch of yellow with each layer until you get the contrast you want.

You guys are teaching me a few tricks I had NO idea about.

Going up to an orange on Red, and then Red glaze back over it was something I have never seen.

The Clear colors also are a mind blower to me.!

Thanks robinh

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I like and agree with all of the comments you have gotten so far Jay.   The red highlighted with orange works for me usually.  If you don't have an orange just mix a bright yellow into your red (slowly) and do light layering adding a touch of yellow with each layer until you get the contrast you want.

You guys are teaching me a few tricks I had NO idea about.

Going up to an orange on Red, and then Red glaze back over it was something I have never seen.

The Clear colors also are a mind blower to me.!

Thanks robinh

 

 

You just gotta know I have to sneak some orange in the paint mix somewhere!  :upside:

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 Any time you add a real rock to your minis, you need to paint it - Yes, even if you're just painting on the colors and details that are already there so it looks exactly like it already did... ::):  (it's like that old joke about getting a full-body tattoo of yourself, lol)

 

Because the rock is real, when the human mind looks at the mini, it sees a real pebble and a not-real miniature. The cognitive dissonance caused by the noticeable visual contrast between the "style" of the rock and the style of the mini breaks us out of the "scene", to use a theatre term. If you paint the rock to look exactly like it already does, but in the same painted style as the miniature, the eye and thus the mind won't see the difference and will then contemplate the "image" as a whole rather than as individual parts that don't fit together.

I often encounter this issue in my photoshop work when trying to paste something from a photograph into an illustration or vise versa. Which is why I always sample colors from the surrounding image and use them as a "glaze", to use a mini-painting term, to better blend the objects into the surrounding image, or sometimes even redraw completely over them. (I started out in image-modification by drawing elf ears on photos of women, and learned a lot about drawing photo-realism and how to trick the eye into seeing what you want it to, a lot of which also applies to mini painting as well.)

 

Also remember that, at the scale we work at, we need to paint on the highlights and shadows on pretty much everything. (Thus ub3r's suggestion of putting a wash on the grass. Once I have all my grass in place, I usually at least try (with varying degrees of success, lol) to add a thin wash or gently drybrush it a bit.) In your "scene", that pebble is actually a boulder over a foot tall and the crack on it is almost a foot long and probably almost an inch wide in some parts. Because it doesn't read that way naturally, you have to help it along a bit by enhancing the details that are already there.

 

 Overall, I do have to agree with Marsya that the vivid color of the rock and it's relatively large size, as cool as it looks on its own, draw just a bit too much attention away from the miniature.

 

 


From a natural/geological perspective, considering the color of the grass and the surrounding ground a light grey rock would more natural and be more geologically accurate. Or, if the rock were to remain that color, it would be more accurate to have tan grass and a lighter soil color...
I find that studying images of landscapes of various sorts from different areas and climates helps me to better understand what different types of terrain should look like and how the different seasons affect the way they look. (Living in semi-rural coastal New England my whole life (with it's wide variation of terrains and ecosystems), and having amateur landscape photography as one of my other hobbies, I've become very aware of the visual differences in different environments.)

 

Edited by Mad Jack
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 Any time you add a real rock to your minis, you need to paint it - Yes, even if you're just painting on the colors and details that are already there so it looks exactly like it already did... ::):  (it's like that old joke about getting a full-body tattoo of yourself, lol)

Most Interesting Mad Jack.

That is a pile O Data that I have never encountered before.

Fortunately, the pebble was not cured yet, so I removed it, and replaced it with static grass. 

I'm not going to do any further painting, and when the grass is cured I will seal the mini, and start

another project.  This has been quite the Learner for me !

Thank you for your input, and information !

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 Yeah, I really love the sound of my own voice, don't I? lol ::D:

 

Once you start getting into the more advanced stuff like scenic basing, non-metallic metal and object source lighting, being able to apply knowledge from other areas you might not normally associate with mini painting really begins to pay off. Obviously, having some basic knowledge of art (things like perspective, light and color theory) helps a great deal, but also having a grasp of things like photography (composition of the scene), anatomy, physics, naturalism (geology, forestry, etc.) and even theatre or human psychology (especially as it applies to how our brains translate the things we see) can all add to and inform our perspective when making choices during the design, painting and basing process.

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Mad Jack..

Sounds like I have gotten myself into a heap of "stuff"..

Think I'll just paint, and let you headier folks work out all the rules, and

philosophically work out the ethics of one inch mini's.

I'll just paint and have a good time.. !

ROFL.

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