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Regarding WIP threads--I try to give feedback/tips/constructive criticism when I can; a lot of people here are a lot better than I am, so sometimes all I can do is cheer from the sidelines.

 

I cheer often, but I also offer advice/comments/critiques to them (especially when they ask for it and/or I know the person well).

 

When I get started on my next round of competition pieces, I'm going to ask for tough love advice/critiques so that I can better myself and get more honest opinions of what I need to do to elevate my work.

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WIP- I don't post enough on other poeples painting to get feedback on mine. I post more on off topic nonsense, to get feedback you need to give feedback IMO.

I think it's more to get feedback, ask for it.

 

Really, people around here are astonishingly generous with their time.

 

Bathory,,, Pingo has it right.  Post and ask for feedback and you will receive guidance from all levels of painters.  Some, like myself, can comment on what we see as an area for improvement as we are in the same boat, others , like the very experienced painters will give you guidance and very sound advice from thier many years of experience and contest winning entries.   A lot of these experienced forumites don't post that much of thier own work but do provided feedback and pay attention to the WIP and show Off areas to help others out.

 

So, post what and when you want and request honest feedback.  You will get it and very little or zero negative feedback on these forums.  The people here want to help and share, it is not a competition.  Even the contests are all about sharing and are very friendly.

 

My painting grew from feed back and mostly reading posts. Example MonkeySloths Technique. 

 

I understand your dilemma and I think prioritizing your unpainted collection is a good idea. For me I have them in order. I'm finishing up on one right now and about to start another. While doing these and all the previous ones I have been working toward doing one in particular for a friend of mine. I didn't feel I could do it well enough back when I started (about a year ago) but now I think i could do it justice. 

 

If you have some you are not excited about put them in the, "I'm going to try this technique out" pile. Or another one called, "I'm going to push my timing and try and do it in half the time" stack. Then take the ones you REALLY like and put them at the end and/or scattered among the test miniatures. 

 

Additionally, I know for me I had to lower my expectation of what I wanted out of the paint job. I don't mean that in a negative manner but more of a... I'm not painting like MASSIVE VOODOO here. I'm taking what I learn and making it a cleaner. My archery mentor use to tell me, "you become a master by observing the masters then making it your won, it's very rare if not even impossible that you can make your own absolutely unique style from nothing." 

 

Ok soapbox done.

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Regarding WIP threads--I try to give feedback/tips/constructive criticism when I can; a lot of people here are a lot better than I am, so sometimes all I can do is cheer from the sidelines.

 

Yeah a lot of the minis are way better so I have nothing to say (or feel dumb saying to improve something that is light years ahead of mine) or are at the same stage as me so it's just a "like" since so many of us are in the noob level of painting. There are also trained artists who have all kinds of color theory and smart things to say and I'm all... uhhhh put blood on it. :)

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The penciller great George Perez once *stated "First you get good, then you get fast, then you get good and fast."  I think this would hold true in painting minis as well.

 

*Stated in an interview in his 90s Avenger run.

 

 

Hmmmm, it may have been Dave Sim:

 

http://www.cerebusfangirl.com/artists/nftp/171.php

Edited by papercut
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I was discussing this with my younger son last week, since I'm about to launch into a project needing units of troops (hundreds of miniatures, I hope) on the the table in a reasonable amount of time. (By next year's convention season, March to August...) I've been spending my painting time the last few months attempting to do better paint jobs on individuals, and you can see from some of my posts whether you'd conisider that a success or not. Anyway, his observation was that the more time he's been spending on single figure/high level painting, the harder he's been finding it to knock out a unit to a tabletop standard. The result is that his fantasy El Cid armies are not getting into playing condition because he's getting slower as he goes. We'll see whether I can shift back and forth between the levels better with my greater experience level. ::P:

 

Anyway, if you found yourself in that mode, you might want to do as many of the mass-level figures as you can stand first...

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I'm currently working on a Crocodile Beloved of Sobek. ( WIP is posted).

 

Even though I have painted for decades I still think I paint slow. If I try to speedpaint I still paint for hours.

Never being satisfied with how it turns out might be part of the problem.

 

I started this guy yesterday morning and finished around dinner time.

Still he has only some basic colours and some first highlights.

 

But maybe that's just me. Others are able to churn out beautiful minis in two hours.

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I was discussing this with my younger son last week, since I'm about to launch into a project needing units of troops (hundreds of miniatures, I hope) on the the table in a reasonable amount of time. (By next year's convention season, March to August...) I've been spending my painting time the last few months attempting to do better paint jobs on individuals, and you can see from some of my posts whether you'd conisider that a success or not. Anyway, his observation was that the more time he's been spending on single figure/high level painting, the harder he's been finding it to knock out a unit to a tabletop standard. The result is that his fantasy El Cid armies are not getting into playing condition because he's getting slower as he goes. We'll see whether I can shift back and forth between the levels better with my greater experience level. ::P:

 

Anyway, if you found yourself in that mode, you might want to do as many of the mass-level figures as you can stand first...

 

This is a particularly difficult thing to do and I do it all the time as I'm principly a historical tabletop gamer. So overall my "tabletop" quality has jumped up but sometimes it does take longer to finish full units of minis, particularly difficult in skirmish type games where they are all individuals. What I recommend is the carrot and stick technique. You don't get to paint any characters or standout leaders until the unit or units that they will command are done. I typically play brigade level games for the ACW and regimental level games in AWI. A brigade may consist of upwards of 100+ minis so all of those have to be painted before I can paint the general and his aides that will be leading that brigade. I can afford to take the extra time to make them really stand out.

 

Assembly line painting is your friend. For army work I mount the miniatures on popsicle or craft sticks (jumbo size), usually 3 - 5 minis per stick. Then I work my way down the line; start with the skin, paint the skin on all the minis, move to the next color and repeat till complete.

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This is a particularly difficult thing to do and I do it all the time as I'm principly a historical tabletop gamer. So overall my "tabletop" quality has jumped up but sometimes it does take longer to finish full units of minis, particularly difficult in skirmish type games where they are all individuals. What I recommend is the carrot and stick technique. You don't get to paint any characters or standout leaders until the unit or units that they will command are done. I typically play brigade level games for the ACW and regimental level games in AWI. A brigade may consist of upwards of 100+ minis so all of those have to be painted before I can paint the general and his aides that will be leading that brigade. I can afford to take the extra time to make them really stand out.

 

Assembly line painting is your friend. For army work I mount the miniatures on popsicle or craft sticks (jumbo size), usually 3 - 5 minis per stick. Then I work my way down the line; start with the skin, paint the skin on all the minis, move to the next color and repeat till complete.

I'm also a historical gamer, so I understand about the numbers involved, and the likely viewing conditions...

 

I have done the assembly line painting; it'll have to be something I get back to for this project...I haven't done much of it in the last five or so years. I like the motivational reward system. I've done that a little before, too, but not consistently. Organization is going to be the key this time around. ::P:

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I have 2020 miniatures. I got them 'cause I wanted to paint them (at least that's what I keep telling myself :rolleyes: ).

The question is how do I want to paint them? Try to do a fast but decent (good enough/tabletop) job on them or try to push the limits with each one, in order to get better? I'm already fairly sure I'm not gonna ever reach the level of a lot of the stuff I

saw at Reapercon last weekend, but does that mean that I shouldn't try?

Or do I compromise and do the hordes of orcs and goblins to a tabletop level, but try to make the orc warlord look as good as possible?

 

It'd be interesting to hear your thoughts/opinions on this.

 

Right there with you and everyone else on this thread. With my boxes of bones minis, I'm mostly aiming for fast and decent, and trying new techniques here and there. I do a decent table top mini and occasionally reach a slightly better than table top standard. But I can spend obscene amounts of time on a mini with no noticeable improvement. My main goal is to reach "good enough" call it done, and move on. There are a few minis where I think it's worth my time and effort to try my best. Usually these are bigger minis, but not always. My major roadblock is thinking I'm not good enough to try some of those more impressive minis.

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Without realizing it, I think doing groups is how I got back into the hobby.

 

Rats, Orcopalypse orcs, classic goblin blisters. It allowed me to practice on many minis with similar color schemes. So while one mini's coat was drying, I could continue on another and quickly see the results and do adjustments.

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I have 2020 miniatures. I got them 'cause I wanted to paint them (at least that's what I keep telling myself :rolleyes: ).

The question is how do I want to paint them? Try to do a fast but decent (good enough/tabletop) job on them or try to push the limits with each one, in order to get better? I'm already fairly sure I'm not gonna ever reach the level of a lot of the stuff I

saw at Reapercon last weekend, but does that mean that I shouldn't try?

Or do I compromise and do the hordes of orcs and goblins to a tabletop level, but try to make the orc warlord look as good as possible?

 

It'd be interesting to hear your thoughts/opinions on this.

 

Right there with you and everyone else on this thread. With my boxes of bones minis, I'm mostly aiming for fast and decent, and trying new techniques here and there. I do a decent table top mini and occasionally reach a slightly better than table top standard. But I can spend obscene amounts of time on a mini with no noticeable improvement. My main goal is to reach "good enough" call it done, and move on. There are a few minis where I think it's worth my time and effort to try my best. Usually these are bigger minis, but not always. My major roadblock is thinking I'm not good enough to try some of those more impressive minis.

 

That's what always stalls me, too.

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I have 2020 miniatures. I got them 'cause I wanted to paint them (at least that's what I keep telling myself :rolleyes: ).

The question is how do I want to paint them? Try to do a fast but decent (good enough/tabletop) job on them or try to push the limits with each one, in order to get better? I'm already fairly sure I'm not gonna ever reach the level of a lot of the stuff I

saw at Reapercon last weekend, but does that mean that I shouldn't try?

Or do I compromise and do the hordes of orcs and goblins to a tabletop level, but try to make the orc warlord look as good as possible?

 

It'd be interesting to hear your thoughts/opinions on this.

 

Right there with you and everyone else on this thread. With my boxes of bones minis, I'm mostly aiming for fast and decent, and trying new techniques here and there. I do a decent table top mini and occasionally reach a slightly better than table top standard. But I can spend obscene amounts of time on a mini with no noticeable improvement. My main goal is to reach "good enough" call it done, and move on. There are a few minis where I think it's worth my time and effort to try my best. Usually these are bigger minis, but not always. My major roadblock is thinking I'm not good enough to try some of those more impressive minis.

 

That's what always stalls me, too.

 

 

Impressive minis is why we strip minis. Be bold take one of them and do what you consider your best work on it right now. Finish it! When you are done if you don't like it then strip it back down and it will be ready when you level up. I have a box full of minis like that, and I have now started to just get the paint on them or consider selling them. They aren't doing anyone any good hiding away in a box.

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