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I know a lot of painters who like Raphael. I didn't care for the one I had. I gave it away a few Rcons ago to someone who did. On the same note I have a Size 0 W&N S7M that I like just fine. The smaller size and shorter bristles give it less capacity, but it has saved my buttsky on a couple of minis that I couldn't get the eyes with any other brush. Honestly though my RMS 0, 1, and 2 get more use than any of my other brushes. Though of late my size 0 has gone awol.

 

I also have some cheapo brushes I bought at Hobby Lobby a while back. They are rigger brushes, and they have some form of not Kolinsky natural bristle. They have a triangular handle that I like a lot. They are good for base coats and some detail, and I think I paid like 5 bucks for the whole set.

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Are "these good ones"?   No. They're all mediocre brushes at best.   Good brushes are made of Kolinsky Sable, by a very few manufacturers: Winsor & Newton, Raphael, da Vinci, and arguably a co

Nothing to add other than what Cash says, "Life is too short for cheap brushes!"   I also like sizes 1 & 2 for both W&N and Raphael.

There are many things that pull individuals towards one type of brush over another.  Some of this has to do with style, preference on hair length but mostly with the way one paints.   The benefits o

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I once read somewhere, that you should ask the store for a small cup of water and a piece of paper to test the tips of brushes before you buy them. Never tried this at Michaels, AC Moore, or Hobby Lobby, but the place where I got the W&Ns had no problem with this. The article said that any reputable store wouldn't have issues....

Anyone else try this?

 

 

I haven't tried that myself but I came across the same tip.    It was in the old orange Warhammer Fantasy Battles game book (Oldhammer these days).   I was browsing through a copy of it yesterday, in the section where it talks about painting your miniatures, they give the exact same tip that most reputable art shops would have dishes of water so you could point the brushes.  Because 'artists take their brushes seriously' or something to that effect.

 

I really like my W&N S7s, but I'm also trying out a Pinceton 4050 'best' synthetic kolinsky I picked up to bulk an order up to free shipping mark.   It's a size 2, that holds a beautiful point thus far but has a little bit less belly than the W&N of the same size with just a bit more snap on the synthetic.     I just need to get myself back into painting mode again and put it to some actual work to see how it holds up.

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I once read somewhere, that you should ask the store for a small cup of water and a piece of paper to test the tips of brushes before you buy them. Never tried this at Michaels, AC Moore, or Hobby Lobby, but the place where I got the W&Ns had no problem with this. The article said that any reputable store wouldn't have issues....

Anyone else try this?

 

 

I haven't tried that myself but I came across the same tip.    It was in the old orange Warhammer Fantasy Battles game book (Oldhammer these days).   I was browsing through a copy of it yesterday, in the section where it talks about painting your miniatures, they give the exact same tip that most reputable art shops would have dishes of water so you could point the brushes.  Because 'artists take their brushes seriously' or something to that effect.

 

I really like my W&N S7s, but I'm also trying out a Pinceton 4050 'best' synthetic kolinsky I picked up to bulk an order up to free shipping mark.   It's a size 2, that holds a beautiful point thus far but has a little bit less belly than the W&N of the same size with just a bit more snap on the synthetic.     I just need to get myself back into painting mode again and put it to some actual work to see how it holds up.

 

 

Art stores, especially those run or where the sellers are use art students or people, can be a joy to visit. You can actually discuss painting, even if with different mediums. I once asked for water to test a bunch of brushed, the clerk got behind the store and brought me a small, paint-stained, well loved ceramic cup with water. THAT is how a good store should treat you IMHO. I knew right there they knew what they were talking about. 

 

Also, when discussing wet palettes (not common here) the old lady who owns the store approached us to talk about it. 

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My preferred brand is Isabey for Kolinsky brushes. I ordered three, and they arrived perfect. I previously used Winsor and Newton, and though I liked them I had quality issues with them. I've also tried Escoda Tajmyr Kolinsky but those also had issues:
 
kolinok_zpszxfd4bhz.png

 

I got a refund but it had the same issues. I won't buy any more Escodas.

This might be an unpopular opinion but I consider Kolinsky mandatory for miniature painting. Our hobby requires fine details on a tiny scale and no other brush can perform as well as sable. I do use a lot of synthetics though because they're very good for blocking in colour.

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My preferred brand is Isabey for Kolinsky brushes. I ordered three, and they arrived perfect. I previously used Winsor and Newton, and though I liked them I had quality issues with them. I've also tried Escoda Tajmyr Kolinsky but those also had issues:

 *snipped*

I got a refund but it had the same issues. I won't buy any more Escodas.

 

This might be an unpopular opinion but I consider Kolinsky mandatory for miniature painting. Our hobby requires fine details on a tiny scale and no other brush can perform as well as sable. I do use a lot of synthetics though because they're very good for blocking in colour.

 

I wouldn't say it's an unpopular opinion, though I personally don't agree that they are mandatory.   I've seen amazing work done with nothing beyond cheap taklon brushes.    Would a fine quality sable make it easier to accomplish?   Perhaps.   But if an artist knows their tools and is comfortable with them then that's what matters.  (Full disclosure, I don't consider myself an artist.  I'm a dabbler, who slaps together tabletop grade minis and not much to higher standards).  So far I've not done anything that would be impossible without a fine quality Kolinsky, though they do make some things a bit easier.      Like craft paints vs artists paints vs miniature paints.    Any of them can accomplish great things... but some make things easier.

 

Kolinsky brushes are widely regarded as the best for a reason, I'm sure.  I really like the ones I have, but they're just another tool in the toolbox.    I've only used W&N so far and have been pleased with them.     I'd happily make use of Raphael, Isabey, Rosemary, WAMP or whatever else I get my greedy little mits on.  

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This might be an unpopular opinion but I consider Kolinsky mandatory for miniature painting.

 

:rock:

 

In which universe is that an unpopular opinion?  :;):

 

Welcome to the forums, BTW.

 

 

 

The universe populated by little weasels that are about to get their tails turned into paint brushes.

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I have come to love my Rosemary& Co brushes. Because of a renovation I haven't been able to paint for quite some time. Just the other day I was able to set up my work area again, and pull out my brushes. A dip in water and the tips where as fine as the day I got them, and they handle so well. I normally use the #1 but for larger areas like cloaks, the #2 is a dream. It holds enough paint you can do the whole of a cloak without having to reload, and has a fine enough point to get into any tight folds and crevices. I have a whole slew of other cheap brushes that I use for all sorts of things, primer, mixing, terrain and what not, but when it comes to figures, those two brushes are almost all I use, with one noteworthy exception.  I have an Army Painter "Hobby Highlighting" brush that I do almost all my lining with. Thin bristles, and it goes where I want. Still behaves wonderfully, after a couple years of use. (my couple of years, is about the same as a wekk or two for some of you mind)

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Whenever somebody brings the "oh poor weasel" line into the conversation, I am about to ask how do they live. What do they eat? How many things in their houses, or every day life, contain pig, cow, chicken? Do you know how those animals are bred and kept for "farming" into your lovely makeup, clothing, linen, so many things?

 

Another thing that is brought up many times is "there are some great artists that produce amazing work with synths". I admit I do not know of anyone. Can you please point me out in the right direction? Except for Wappel, who uses Kolinsky brushes for detail anyway but his "not-drybrush" general work is done with filberts (and they may or may not be synths), all the top-tier painters I know of use Kolinsky brushes, be them W&N, Raphs, DaVinci, Isabey, R&C...

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Judging from the brand, Jim Wappel's filberts are synthetics. His green handled craft brushes definitely are. But, as you say, he does keep some Kolinsky sable liners for detail work.

 

I've become a convert to using the green handled craft brushes as well. I still use my Da Vinci's for the detail work when needed, but I get surprising amount done with the craft brushes and filberts.

 

Ron

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Whenever somebody brings the "oh poor weasel" line into the conversation, I am about to ask how do they live. What do they eat? How many things in their houses, or every day life, contain pig, cow, chicken? Do you know how those animals are bred and kept for "farming" into your lovely makeup, clothing, linen, so many things?

 

Another thing that is brought up many times is "there are some great artists that produce amazing work with synths". I admit I do not know of anyone. Can you please point me out in the right direction? Except for Wappel, who uses Kolinsky brushes for detail anyway but his "not-drybrush" general work is done with filberts (and they may or may not be synths), all the top-tier painters I know of use Kolinsky brushes, be them W&N, Raphs, DaVinci, Isabey, R&C...

At one point I do believe Marike Reimer used to use synthetics, but that may have changed.

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