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Dragons Don't Share Terrain. To base or not to base?


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Last night my friend gave me the terrain from the "Dragons Don't share". I've got all the terrain pieces except for the dragons base and I'm very impressed.  It's going to be an excellent addition to my terrain collection and it's got so much texture that it will be a breeze to quickly paint up.

 

My question is whether or not I should mount the various pieces to hardboard.  It's a bit warped right now, but it's nothing I can't handle with some hot water.  My worry however is that once it's painted, if it warps again I can't just put it under hot water and even a hair dryer could potentially do bad things to the paintjob.  I store my terrain in a garage'ish environment and things can get pretty hot in the Chicago summer.

 

The solution would be to mount it on a piece of hardboard after reshaping it to give it some rigidity.  This would be a bit of a hassle and would mean that it wouldn't melt quite so seamlessly into my wargames table, but the peace of mind might be worth it.

 

Has anyone flattened these bases out and had time to see how well it keeps the new shape?

Edited by Eilif
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I flattened my daughter's set about two weeks ago, and it still seems to be holding its shape fine. However, I haven't subjected it to the heat of the garage, nor has it been painted or handled much since then. If you are really concerned about it, I'd put them on a backing, just to be safe. I don't think it is really necessary, however. YMMV.

 

~v

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To help a hardboard base blend into the background, I find that it helps if I sand down the edge. (I actually use a bench grinder, because it's fast and easy for me, btw.) I don't find that the thin edge, if the base board is painted and flocked appropriately, is particularly obtrusive.

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Finally got around to painting this thing.  A soak in some boiling water followed by a reshape and cool water failed to get an even flat bottom so I glued it down to some fairly thick hardboard.   To keep the pieces fitting together properly I did have to cut the hardboard mostly strait down with no bevel, but a bit of sand ( I also sprinkled a bit it here and there on the whole thing) made it look pretty natural.

 

I'll have a post with pics up soon, but suffice to say I highly recommend basing this thing.

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Forgive the necromancy, but two updates.

 

First, I forgot about this thread but figured I should post the link to the" show-off" topic with the finished pics.

http://forum.reapermini.com/index.php?/topic/62420-dragons-dont-share-77381-terrain-finished/

 

Secondly, I recently finished up a second example of the top of the tower section. It had been given to me by a friend who couldn't get the two parts to join correctly.  By gluing it in phases (first one corner, then the bit next to it and hold, then another...) using water thin superlue (that sucks into the cracks and dries fast) I was able to get it glued together quickly easily.  However like the first set, I couldn't get it to lie perfectly flat on the table.  I ended up basing it as it's own ruined tower on a bit of hardboard.  It looks great and I've got no worries about warping now.  No pics unfortunately as I already gave it to a buddy of mine as a going-away present.

 

I really do love Bones for terrain. It's easy to paint, affordable and super sturdy. Though I'm drowning in figs and terrain projects I still ordered the Stone-hengey "Mystic Circle" terrain piece from Bones 3.  However, I will likely never use large bones terrain pieces without sturdy basing.   Pieces of PVC this big are just too prone to slight warpage.  It isn't an issue for most sides of the model, but can be a problem if one side needs to remain perfectly flat.  The danger of warpage is compounded if you live in an area like Chicago with very high and very low temperatures, even moreso if you store your terrain in a garage or porch. 

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