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WIP: Treasure Horde atop a Broken Column Display Base


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For my online business, we cut lots of wood and leave lots of pieces in the scrap bin. Well, we just processed a beautiful seasoned branch of oak and cut it every which way right up to the very last piece, the spot where it was cut from the body of the tree.

 

For some reason I spent a few minutes looking at the piece and decided to bring it with me to clean up. As you can see in the pics it cleaned up but I wasn't sure what to do with it.

 

So, I had just posted an ash burl to my website and suggested in the description making it into a treasure horde for your dragon. And I realized what this piece was... a broken column sitting amongst the dwarven horde lost to a dragon.

 

As you can see below, I painted the middle to look like solid rock. I left it slightly exaggerated so the paint could be seen under the gold and artifacts I was planning to place on it.

 

Next step, add the booty to the piece. Which is going to require making some treasure bits, golden and silvery pieces with a smattering of platinum. The last question is, being a dwarven treasure, would you use coins, bullion nuggets, or both for the piled mass?

 

 

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Edited by Thrym
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Oh and maybe a weapon or two made of Mithril! 

 

I'll see what the ol' parts bin has.  Might have to cheat and hint at the weapon under other treasure with the bits I have.

 

But I think I will definitely add a chest to this equation as an anchor point.

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 How big around is the piece? Would it fit on top of a base you have? I was thinking if you set it on a slightly larger base, you could probably carve the sides of it to look like a pillar, and then have a bit of room around the bottom to spread a bit more treasure...

Also, it's pretty easy to file down a bit of sprue into a blade - especially a dagger (take a hobby knife, measure off along one edge how long you want the visible piece of the blade to be, then slice off a long triangular wedge off of one corner -bingo, you have the basic shape of the blade and all it requires is shaving down the one side with the corner on it so it's flat and adding the edges).

You might even consider sacrificing a Bones skeleton for some armor, weapons and...<ahem> bones, lol.

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After making three more ropes of green stuff into coins and making a goblet, I was distracted by the arrival of my "Your Board" dungeon tile making kit from Happy Seppuku.

 

Couple of quick shots of test pieces:

 

post-7739-0-56784100-1432820666.jpg

10' x 20' room/corridor with jungle slate stamp and inch marks (2" x 4")

 

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10' x 10' hexagon pattern with Reaper Crimson HD washed on it.  (2" x 2")  The hexagon pattern was supplied by a silicon trivet.  I sanded the tops of the pattern to get them to look more worn and flat.  The stamp dug deep which bulges the top of the clay pushed into it.

 

There's a third one but I made it with black clay and haven't added any paint to it yet to show off the pattern.  I used an alligator pattern from Sculpey on it.

 

Here's what the silicon trivet look like:

 

HT12.nfFR4cXXagOFbXz.jpg

 

I found this cool Tutorial when I looked up the trivet for a pic just now:  http://roebeast.blogspot.com/2012/07/making-simple-hexagon-tile-base.html

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