Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Recommended Posts

For my birthday earlier this month my husband gave me various terrain pieces, including these resin pieces from Novus Design Studio.
post-8022-0-80267700-1435527749.jpg
 
They are: 1019 - 28mm Fantasy Bridge; 1052 - 28mm Artillery Position; 1015 - 28mm Fantasy Wall Set; and 1079 - 15mm Stalingrad Red October Factory Ruin, or as I have been thinking of them: the bridge, the cul-de-sac, the walls, and the really cool even if it is a little small abandoned factory.

 

I've never worked with resin before, and this has had something of a learning curve even for the priming.

 

I scrubbed these things well with warm water and dish liquid, but wow, do they repel paint in parts.

 

At first I mixed the paint with a little flow release, but that didn't work out too well.  It still beaded up and the dried paint film was soft and susceptible to being picked up by a wet brush, suggesting a weak paint film later on.

 

This is how they looked after a single coat of primer:

post-8022-0-19058600-1435528137.jpg

 

post-8022-0-27232000-1435528131.jpg

 

post-8022-0-41346400-1435528145.jpg

 

The walls were mostly okay, with at least one wall having a ferociously paint-resistant top, even after double scrubbing with hot water and strong dish soap.  Not even rubbing alcohol could break the beading and surface tension.

 

So I switched tactics.

 

I decided to mix my paint with a medium I have used previously when painting fiberglass sculpture, GAC 200 from Golden Paints which improves adhesion and reduces tack when dry.

 

This is why I blinked when I first saw Reaper paints:

post-8022-0-90097400-1435528345.jpg

 

The other thing I would do is keep a hair dryer blowing on the paint to dry it fast before it had a chance to bead up.  This necessitated the sacrifice of a couple of brushes because they had to be used under warm blowing air.  It also required a certain amount of juggling hands.

 

But it seems to have worked, and the paint film is much stronger.  This is how the pieces looked after the second coat of primer:

post-8022-0-05352500-1435528460.jpg

 

post-8022-0-90948400-1435528444.jpg

 

post-8022-0-23280200-1435528453.jpg

 

And the third coat of primer.  I had to stop using the camera's flash because they looked so white they only had a silhouette of the shape.  In real life they do not look quite this opaque white:

post-8022-0-04269400-1435528569.jpg

 

post-8022-0-81884000-1435528558.jpg

 

The factory I did last.  It looks really cool, but all the detail is at the moment washed out by the white primer.  I didn't remove all the flash and I think the hexagonal spaces in the ceiling supports were supposed to be cut out, but there's only so much work I have the spoons for in prep.

post-8022-0-92658100-1435528685.jpg

 

post-8022-0-66681800-1435528693.jpg

 

post-8022-0-01397900-1435528701.jpg

 

post-8022-0-64849400-1435528708.jpg

 

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, I've found that diluting my initial base coat heavily with alcohol (usually isopropyl, but sometimes ordinary old meths) helps a lot with priming hydrophobic surfaces. You need to do a test first though, as some acrylics react in very peculiar ways to some alcohols.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am concerned that the base coat might be a little thick in places.  It was a real struggle to get it to stick some places.

 

Anyhow, I washed over the white priming with Burnt Umber and let the pieces dry before taking photos.

 

The walls each have a skull motif on one side and are plain the other.

 

I don't think I am going to paint these conventionally.  I get bored easily, you see ...

post-8022-0-58570300-1435540569.jpg

 

post-8022-0-68881400-1435540584.jpg

 

post-8022-0-41504500-1435540593.jpg

 

post-8022-0-30959800-1435540600.jpg

 

post-8022-0-05490900-1435540615.jpg

 

post-8022-0-58937500-1435540620.jpg

 

post-8022-0-69394000-1435540625.jpg

 

  • Like 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what to make of the hex shapes in the factory roof spans. Never seen the like in a real factory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried TSP (trisodium phosphate) or a substitute if you can't find the real stuff?  It's used on slick panel walls, glazed tiles, and generally any too-glossy-to-hold-paint surface to increase adherence.  I've got some 2-part resin that resists the first coat of paint like the surface is oily (or that plastic that aquarium plants are made of...grr).  It seems to take some spray primers alright or undiluted acrylic paint. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That factory piece already looks pretty good; kinda like it's burned out and been exposed to the elements for a few years.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Impact has some info on their website for how to prime Trollforged resin which is fairly hydrophobic. The info there might work here as well. Also I've found the Brown liner tecnique that people use on bones minis worked pretty well on my Impact Chibi pumpkinhead guy. My only other experience with resin was a mini from a Spanish French company and I didn't have much trouble with priming that one if I recall.

Edit: oops meant to reply to the other thread. :wow:

Edit again: It was Fenryll in France

Edited by EvilJames
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Impact has some info on their website for how to prime Trollforged resin which is fairly hydrophobic. The info there might work here as well. Also I've found the Brown liner tecnique that people use on bones minis worked pretty well on my Impact Chibi pumpkinhead guy. My only other experience with resin was a mini from a Spanish company and I didn't have much trouble with priming that one if I recall.

Edit: oops meant to reply to the other thread. :wow:

Eh, that's okay.

 

Would it violate the forum's commerce rules to link to the info?  I'm having a little trouble finding it. :mellow:

 

I may have to strip these pieces and restart. :unsure:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It probobly would violate the rules, however if you look any chibi mini (probably any trollcast mini) in their online catalog, it should be note 5, "painting trollcast" It says you need spray primers with a self etching agent and then lists some.

Just above note 6 where it tells you not to light your minis on fire. lol.

Edited by EvilJames

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I play a WWII wargame that uses resin for the main body of most of the 15mm tanks, troop carriers etc. I have always used P3 Black primer on them....

 

Pingo, maybe break down and get some spray Primer? The P3 white is what I use for "people" Black for "Items" like your walls, etc

 

Just a thought.

 

8)

George

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For this particular reason I would go with a regular spray on enamel primer; Armoury, GW, P3, Armypainter, Tamiya, Mr Surface etc.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Pingo
      Coincidentally, I had this figure very nearly done two days ago when the sad news of Diana Rigg’s passing was made public.
       
      It always was a tribute to her incandescent portrayal of Emma Peel in the old British TV show “The Avengers”, but now it’s a memorial as well. Requiescas in pacem, Ms. Rigg.
       
      The figure is “Pandora King (Classic)” from Crooked Dice miniatures. Crooked Dice has a minis game based on cult TV and they’ve produced a lot of different figures suitable for that sort of storytelling.
       

       

       

       

       

       
         
    • By Pingo
      Happy birthday, @TheAuldGrump and @Inarah. I hope you enjoy this. Notes follow after the photos.
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
      This is Grenadier’s Hippogriff, #138 from the Fantasy Lords series way back in 1983, now sold in lead-free pewter by Mirliton Miniatures, Italy. It’s well sculpted, with securely fitting wings.
       
      I wanted to paint something different from the common hippogriff colorings, something with a little challenge to it. So I decided to go with several black and white patterned creatures. The front end is based on an osprey, the wings on a hoopoe’s, and the hindquarters on a zebra, all somewhat modified to suit the figure and to blend where the shifts happen.
       
      Whenever you’re going to paint a chimeric model, a creature made up of the parts of other creatures, it’s a good idea to go look at real animals to see how their colors and feathers and skins look, and also how they blend into other things. If nothing else, there are excellent visual resources on the internet.
       
      Technical notes:
       
    • By Pingo
      These are two copies of the Reaper Bones Large Earth Elemental 77185, sculpted by Kevin Williams.
       
      I saw someone, I can’t recall who, paint up, it might have been one of these, like cooling lava which I thought was lovely, so I wanted to give it a try. I painted the lava version very quickly, in a few sessions: A layer of butter-yellow intensified with yellow glazing, then laying on pure black paint rather thickly, then some washes of Quinacridone Magenta and some fiddling with that and yellow on the gems.
       
      The rock version I painted v-e-r-y slowly, in many layers over time, often with whatever paint was left on my palette from other paintings. I’m not sure when I started it, but since I haven’t painted any minis at all for the last year, it’s been some time.
       
      I thought it interesting how very different a sculpt can look depending on how you paint it.

       

       
        
       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       
       
    • By Pingo
      This is Reaper's 14048, Fatima, Nefsokar Cleric.
       
      Or rather it will be when you click on the links because she's super NSFW, front and back.
       
      CLICK HERE TO SEE THE PAINTED FIGURE FATIMA, NEFSOKAR CLERIC.
       
      There isn't a WIP thread because I couldn't figure out how to make one that would abide by the board rules. But questions or comments are appreciated.
       
      The images are hosted on Instagram so you can post comments there too if you like.
       
    • By Pingo
      Well, I've gone and done it. I got a YouTube channel and have started making a series of videos on matters of paint and painting.
       
      Okay, I say "series of videos" all grandly, but at the moment it's one video and a planned syllabus. But I have more planned!
       
      This is pretty much my first video ever. I was helped a great deal by my family members who have more experience in this.
       
      The first video is a paint comparison, looking at one of the new Liquitex Acrylic Gouache paints (Quinacridone Magenta, PR122) and considering its suitability for miniatures painting.
       
      Enjoy!
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zwonRqv0Xgk
       
       
  • Who's Online   9 Members, 0 Anonymous, 54 Guests (See full list)

×
×
  • Create New...