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Any difference between spray primer and spray enamel?


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Return it if you planned to use it on Bones or any other vinyl. (Model Kits, many prepainted minis, toys, Dwarven forge Gametiles)

 

Might work on metal figs, but many enamels are more likely to cause Permanent Sticky Syndrome on some things with vinyl in it. Also it might go on thicker than you want.

 

Generally you want a plain "primer", a higher quality brand can be helpful if you want your primer to BE your basecoat, but avoid things like "PLASTIC PRIMER" "X2 COVERAGE", etc as many of those go on thicker than needed or can be formulated to chemically bond and fill in detail.

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Personally I like cheap spray primers like Brite Touch, primer just needs to coat, not necessarily be a solid colour like a basecoat.

 

 

No it won't. Go ahead and return it. Primer is formulated prepare a surface for painting by giving it some "tooth". Enamel will be smooth and slick preventing paint from sticking.

Flat 'might' give enough tooth, a gloss would be right out though.

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This is for my metal figures.  I've been using Brown Liner for my Bones.  

 

Okay, I returned it and bought Krylon's flat black primer, but I noticed they also had an ultra flat black primer.  Do I now need to return my flat for the ultra flat or does it matter?

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Along those lines, how much difference is there between the Krylon primer vs. Krylon Paint & Primer? This would mostly be used for Bones and plastic minis (Star Wars Imperial Assault / Monolith's Conan game).

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I'd avoid the Paint & Primers too.  They'll tend to occlude details as well.  Plus, since they're designed to have the smoothest finish possible for whatever level of gloss you use (even flat paint is smoother than primer), it may be harder to stick new paint to it in the end... 

 

Add:  Come to think of it, I think Krylon is one of the spray primers advised AGAINST for Bonesium.  You can search around the forums/internets and find sprays that do work.  I've only worked on brushable primers or straight undercoat with the Bones so far, so I can't attest to a workable spray that doesn't stay tacky indefinitely.

Edited by BLZeebub
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Along those lines, how much difference is there between the Krylon primer vs. Krylon Paint & Primer? This would mostly be used for Bones and plastic minis (Star Wars Imperial Assault / Monolith's Conan game).

As has been beat to death like a unwanted horse, don't use Krylon on your Bones. Other sorts of plastic minis should take primer fine. GW plastics, resins, most other white non-Bones plastics, and pretty much any hard or hard gray plastic is fine with Krylon primer.

 

Now, while MOST Krylon Paint & Primers tend to have less tooth due to smoothness, the camouflage set (which includes black, olive green, woodland green, two kinds of tan, brown and some kind of gray) are all ultra flat colors, and they double as colored primers exceedingly well. Better tooth than the Army Painter colored primers, and a third of the price. And, no, they don't obscure detail. They go on flat and thin as any primer.

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There's no real reason to be using sprays on minis.  They've got too many overhangs and other "shadows", and the small silhouette means most of it goes on your spraying surface.  It's mostly a habit that held over from the modeler side of the house, where the smooth even coats are good for vehicles, especially sports cars and aircraft.  You'll see a lot of voodoo pulled out over the poor performance of sprays - temperature, humidity, shaking it enough, can storage, etc.  But it's rare for someone to bring forth the heresy that it's simply not a very good tool for the job.  They're also fairly toxic and not especially environmentally friendly if that sort of thing concerns you.

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No religion involved.  If you don't have a permanent spray booth with a vent hood, avoiding the wonders of tolulene inhalation involves setting up outside, and breaking down when you're done, on a day when it's convenient.  Using a big sponge brush to prime an average 28mm figure takes under a minute apiece, plus rinsing the brush.  About the same as spray-spray-wait-flip-spray-spray unless you get into big batches and neat tricks like putting a second tray over the one you sprayed in to flip the figures.  The real time sink for prep time is filing off the @#$% mold lines, which I'm sure you enjoy just as much as I do if not more.

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I typically prime somewhere between 8 and 64 figures at a time:

  1. Prep (which does take the majority of the time)
  2. Mount the figures on painting sticks.
  3. Shake the primer (brush on takes about as much time and effort as spray), 
  4. Grab an empty plastic bag to cover my hand.
  5. Step outside and spray both sides (generally around 5-10 seconds per figure; less with units where I'm spraying 8 figures per stick)
  6. Step back inside and wait for the primer to dry (about the same time for any type of primer)

Spray is much faster and gets down in the lines and crannies more easily than brush-on, which speeds later painting, too.

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