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Dr.Bedlam

...And Knowing Is Half The Battle!

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DID YOU KNOW: The word "githyanki" was originally coined by George R. R. "Game Of Thrones" Martin, who apparently used them in his D&D campaign at one point, before mentioning them in passing in his science fiction short stories? He gave nearly no details for what or who they were, other than "githyanki soulsucks," who served the "Hrangan Minds." The creature we know and love was fleshed out by British gamers, and appeared for the first time in the first Fiend Folio for AD&D.

DID YOU KNOW: The first illustration of a bugbear in D&D had the written descriptor "large pumpkin sized head." The artist took this literally, and drew a bearlike creature with a jack-o-lantern for a head. At least one miniatures company released a miniature resembling this in the 1970s, and Reaper recently did so as well.

DID YOU KNOW: The first miniatures for "rust monster," "bulette," and "owlbear" were in fact plastic toys found in a bag of toy dinosaurs found at a dime store? These would become iconic RPG monsters, and were later incorporated into the D&D game proper. Later research showed that at least two -- the owlbear and the bulette -- were based on monsters that had appeared on a 1970s Japanese children's show, possibly "Ultraman" or "Spectreman."

DID YOU KNOW: The phrase, "...and knowing is half the battle!" came from the old 1980s GI Joe cartoon. In an effort to placate parent groups, the show often had little clips at the end of the episode in which childen would learn important lessons about safety or morals, ending when one of the children would make a remark about what he or she had learned, and a GI Joe character would say, "And knowing is half the battle!"

DID YOU KNOW: Noted Reaper representative ReaperBryan has a pool shaped kidney? 

Edited by Dr.Bedlam
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I had heard that, but was unsure of the whole story.

 

I did not know that, but I have seen those old pumpkin headed figures.

 

I was never sure of what was what; I had several of those toys and always wondered what they were, 'cause they sure weren't dinosaurs.

 

Yes, I did know this one. I watched it as a kid.

 

I did not know that. How do you know? :huh:

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I did not know that. How do you know? :huh:

 

1. I was a fan of Martin's before Game Of Thrones ever came out, and noted the word "githyanki" in his short stories. When the Internet was invented, I did the research.

 

2. I once had the old original D&D pamphlets. I wish I still did. I loved it when Jason Wiebe did the design for the minis and matching T shirt!

 

3. This is a common blog article all over. Hell, I still have a few Chinese bulettes.

 

4. TV Tropes.

 

5. Well, I can't say I've ever opened him up and LOOKED, but I assume they aren't SQUARE or anything...

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DID YOU KNOW: The word "githyanki" was originally coined by George R. R. "Game Of Thrones" Martin, who apparently used them in his D&D campaign at one point, before mentioning them in passing in his science fiction short stories? He gave nearly no details for what or who they were, other than "githyanki soulsucks," who served the "Hrangan Minds." The creature we know and love was fleshed out by British gamers, and appeared for the first time in the first Fiend Folio for AD&D.

 

 

Strictly speaking they appeared in White Dwarf magazine (issue #12) before the Fiend Folio.  It was the regular Fiend Factory feature in the magazine that supplied the book with most of its entries.

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I knew about the plastic monsters but I didn't know which came first, the chicken or the egg.

 

The info on githyanki (one of my favorite D&D races/backgrounds) was completely unknown to me.  Love it!

 

=-Jake

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DID YOU KNOW: The word "githyanki" was originally coined by George R. R. "Game Of Thrones" Martin, who apparently used them in his D&D campaign at one point, before mentioning them in passing in his science fiction short stories? He gave nearly no details for what or who they were, other than "githyanki soulsucks," who served the "Hrangan Minds." The creature we know and love was fleshed out by British gamers, and appeared for the first time in the first Fiend Folio for AD&D.

 

 

Strictly speaking they appeared in White Dwarf magazine (issue #12) before the Fiend Folio.  It was the regular Fiend Factory feature in the magazine that supplied the book with most of its entries.

 

 

This is true; I shooda said that. I stand corrected.

 

DID YOU KNOW: At the time the first version of D&D was published (the White Box edition), E. Gary Gygax was unemployed, and was literally running a shoe repair business out of his basement to bring in extra income.

 

DID YOU KNOW: Among the artists working for TSR circa 1981 were Boris Vallejo, Phil Foglio, and Larry Elmore, three guys who would later go on to very successful art careers (although it could be argued that Vallejo was pretty much already there...)

 

DID YOU KNOW: If you own a White Box edition of the original D&D rules, the one with the woodgrain contact paper on the outside of the box... there is roughly a 35% chance that Gary Gygax himself packed that box originally for shipping.

 

DID YOU KNOW: That before becoming a bestselling author, George R. R. Martin was a well known gamemaster, best remembered for his "Superworld" campaign... which would lead to the shared world anthology of "Wild Cards" superhero stories. Many of these stories were written not only by Martin, but by his players, several of which would go on to become well known authors in their own right.

 

DID YOU KNOW: All-Terrain Monkey's wife cosplayed at Reapercon 2010 as Sophie. And she was kickin'.

 

 

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DID YOU KNOW: The word "githyanki" was originally coined by George R. R. "Game Of Thrones" Martin, who apparently used them in his D&D campaign at one point, before mentioning them in passing in his science fiction short stories? He gave nearly no details for what or who they were, other than "githyanki soulsucks," who served the "Hrangan Minds." The creature we know and love was fleshed out by British gamers, and appeared for the first time in the first Fiend Folio for AD&D.

 

DID YOU KNOW: The first illustration of a bugbear in D&D had the written descriptor "large pumpkin sized head." The artist took this literally, and drew a bearlike creature with a jack-o-lantern for a head. At least one miniatures company released a miniature resembling this in the 1970s, and Reaper recently did so as well.

 

DID YOU KNOW: The first miniatures for "rust monster," "bulette," and "owlbear" were in fact plastic toys found in a bag of toy dinosaurs found at a dime store? These would become iconic RPG monsters, and were later incorporated into the D&D game proper. Later research showed that at least two -- the owlbear and the bulette -- were based on monsters that had appeared on a 1970s Japanese children's show, possibly "Ultraman" or "Spectreman."

 

DID YOU KNOW: The phrase, "...and knowing is half the battle!" came from the old 1980s GI Joe cartoon. In an effort to placate parent groups, the show often had little clips at the end of the episode in which childen would learn important lessons about safety or morals, ending when one of the children would make a remark about what he or she had learned, and a GI Joe character would say, "And knowing is half the battle!"

 

DID YOU KNOW: Noted Reaper representative ReaperBryan has a pool shaped kidney? 

1- Knew! I also know that the original artwork for the Githytanki in the Fiend folio was intended for elven mummies.

2- Did not know

3- Knew!

4- Knew! (Still quote it sometimes)

5- Bryan has a pool?!

 

The second batch of "Did you know?" are much more obscure (save for the artists).

Edited by Cranky Dog

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And those ain't cheap!

Edited by Dr.Bedlam

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And those ain't cheap!

 

And my youngest son only has one.

 

And I'm 100% on your second set of Did You Know but only 60% on the first set.

 

(Not surprising since I consider GRRM to be a complete hack  :devil: )

Edited by Heisler
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I never watched GI Joe, but the "knowing is half the battle" were public service messages between other cartoons as well.

Hey kids don't touch a downed power wire in the road, it could still be live!

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DID YOU KNOW: TSR released a boardgame called "Dragonstrike," that was intended as a sort of introduction to D&D. Worth money now.

DID YOU KNOW: The videotape that came with "Dragonstrike" billed itself as "Hyper-Reality," an exciting new form of entertainment. It remains unclear whether "Hyper-Reality" was intended to represent tabletop gaming, or the chroma key and primitive video toaster technology that was used to make the special effects in the videotape.

DID YOU KNOW: In the video, our mighty heroes assemble to seek out and defeat the evil that threatens the barony of Elkhorn. Professional actors played the heroes and villains, and Gamma World creator/TSR management Jim Ward has a cameo as the Overlord of Elkhorn (the guy in the rapid-escape throne!)

DID YOU KNOW: The head writer on the video project was Flint Dille, well known for his many writing credits on the GI Joe cartoon and animated movie (and brother of Lorraine Williams, who was running TSR at the time).

DID YOU KNOW: For the curious and the masochistic, the Dragonstrike video can be seen in its entirety on YouTube, keyword Dragonstrike...

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