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darkfluid

The large demand for buildings and dungeon dressings

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My only wish ...to live long enough in good enough health to paint them all.

 

Terrain's easy to paint! Slap on some greyscale with the craft paints, then wash with Secret Weapon Washes stone or concrete.

 

Not sure what I should do about the ground, since I could use this piece in a dungeon!

 

pic2463065_md.jpg

 

 

 

Some older dungeon floor might get cracked by roots, and then moss, fungi and such creep in, so no problem adding some vegetation to a dungeon floor.

 

My general tendency for ground is to use sand, paint brown, wash with brown ink, drybrush with a lighter brown and/or grey, then add tufts of Winter Tuft from Army Painter. (Tufts of static grass, attached to a background that allows it to be applied in tufts. It took me exactly lone application to become addicted.)

 

If you have ever gone exploring in old forts, you can find poor, straggly clumps of grass in any place where even a little bit of light makes it through. (Also a lovely sour stench, which may or may not include a whiff of urine....)

 

So, I do the same thing with dungeons. ::):

 

The Auld Grump

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What Auld Grump said is pretty much exactly what I do with ground terrain except I drybrush lightly using a bleached bone colour paint.

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I think two points previously mentioned sum it up for me.

 

Firstly, I barely have time to paint minis, never mind build terrain. Plus storage is tight and everything needs to be transportable. A few key pieces of multi-purpose terrain fit my needs more than a full dwarven forge set up.

 

Second, most of the people I game with are easily distracted. There are lots of reasons ranging from ADHD to just having young children around at all. A visual focus for the action helps keep everyone on task. So our crates and barrels from Bones 2 have seen more use than any single monster character, because they're ubiquitous. Reaper's terrain additions so far have been pretty focused and useful so far, so I think they've got the right level of detail.

 

At least, that's my experience.

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Terrain I'm largely ambivalent about personally, but it should be noted that this is because I have a godless amount of Terraclips (24 sets) so I'm probably set... forever.  The crypt and the fences probably aren't going to be a priority for me.  But set dressing bits, those are more interesting.  Gravestones may prove especially useful.  I can build a crypt, and I can build fences around the crypt, but I have to use doors to stand in for gravestones.  It works, but does look a bit silly. 

 

The stalactites from Bones II I didn't initally dig much, but later I realized that by using my Vaults of Ruin terraclips I could make a passable stand-in for caverns and once figuring that out now I'm eager for lots of stalactites... and some ropers for them to turn into when adventurers come within tentacle range. 

 

Terrain I consider a worthy experiment.  If it proves popular, we'll see more of it.  If not, well it was still worth the try. 

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So our crates and barrels from Bones 2 have seen more use than any single monster character, because they're ubiquitous. Reaper's terrain additions so far have been pretty focused and useful so far, so I think they've got the right level of detail.

 

 

The same is probably true here as well.  Props such as those crates and barrels are perfect for "scatter terrain" to quickly "furnish" a room without having to be too specialized about it.  Also, since they're durable Bones plastic, rather than easily-cracked plaster or easily-dinged pewter, I can basically just keep them in a tray with other "scatter props" nearby, and even get away with grabbing them in a clump as needed, rather than having to waste time delicately and reverently tucking them away into their own little foam cubbies for storage.  

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My only wish ...to live long enough in good enough health to paint them all.

 

Terrain's easy to paint! Slap on some greyscale with the craft paints, then wash with Secret Weapon Washes stone or concrete.

 

Not sure what I should do about the ground, since I could use this piece in a dungeon!

 

pic2463065_md.jpg

 

 

 

Some older dungeon floor might get cracked by roots, and then moss, fungi and such creep in, so no problem adding some vegetation to a dungeon floor.

 

My general tendency for ground is to use sand, paint brown, wash with brown ink, drybrush with a lighter brown and/or grey, then add tufts of Winter Tuft from Army Painter. (Tufts of static grass, attached to a background that allows it to be applied in tufts. It took me exactly lone application to become addicted.)

 

If you have ever gone exploring in old forts, you can find poor, straggly clumps of grass in any place where even a little bit of light makes it through. (Also a lovely sour stench, which may or may not include a whiff of urine....)

 

So, I do the same thing with dungeons. ::):

 

The Auld Grump

 

Whoa, smell-o-dungeon! Now you got me thinking. Probably wouldn't go over well with the fiance though. But the realism!

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For me I have always wanted to use terrain in games. Since I am teaching my nieces and nephew to play now terrain can help them better track where everything is played. Also generally I have players ignore the drawn terrain more often, but when an item is there they have to acknowledge it is there and don't need reminding. Though having a prop there also can inspire some crazy actions from them at times. They see a table and the one energetic one would decalre he jumps on the table and runs down to do a jump slash with his sword at the enemy.

 

They don't come up with that action easily, but with a table there they do think of that. I plan to do even more with terrain as it helps draw in the kids for gaming as they love touching. Their desire to play with it is why I love it in bones as they will not wreck the work in their rough handling (and they are very rough without meaning to be)

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Chests, crates, treasure piles, gravestones, all make outstanding markers for use with 2D dungeons; as risk, encounter, spawn or objective points.

Bigger pieces are great for outdoors or wargaming, and I got into miniatures largely via wargaming.

 

A nice outdoor scene with flock, railorad trees, and ruins, looks amazing and really gets people's attention.

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I carefully considered my options between the Graveyard Expansion and Maladrakkar. The 5 headed dragon would be a monumental painting task, and even I assuming I finished him He would be a dusty ornament, never to see play.   The terrain was bought to share with my family.  My elder daughter has painted a few minis (<5 ) but has used them many times to set up housekeeping on one of my pre-printed maps, or to have various adventures. 

 

The rugged bones terrain is going in a big tub in the basement, and while I will make every effort to use graveyards in games, I for see it also being housing, and corrals for ponies, 

 

I originally resisted the idea of bones terrain, thinking that the tower from DDS2 would become stale with use, and I didn't want to drop several hundred into Dwarven forge or the fragile molds and plaster  option.  Plus I would need more storage ... but now I have a house, and more disposable income, so why not? 

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When I play mini games I much prefer a skirmish game, and so items like the fence and the crypt are perfect for that sort of thing. And while I could definitely make my own out of my hirst arts molds, and other techniques, sometimes it's nice to be able to pick up a cheap, light,  and indestructible piece that's easier to transport.

 

That said, it's far more likely to be displayed in my figure case around all my undead minis. Or, at least my more recently painted undead minis...

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@ darkfluid  I totally got that you were just asking an informational question.

I haven't played D&D in a long time and so i was sort of curious as to the various ways people were looking to use the terrain as I am up in the air as whether to get it or not myself.

 

 

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I've never used terrain myself (the premade is too pricey, and I have little enough time to paint minis) but I've wanted to have some terrain just for climactic boss fights.  In standard fights my group just uses imagination, only breaking out the battlemap if conditions call for it (ie. lots of enemies, extremely dangerous terrain, etc.)  They recently lost badly to a green dragon and barely survived, they want revenge, so I'm painting up DDS2 as a green just to make that revenge fight pop a little more.

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I did end up getting the graveyard expansion but mostly for everything else not the crypt. I used to like Dwarven Forge. True sometimes it took a long time to set up but it was really cool. But with their latest kickstarter they decided folks like me who play with a grid were using their pieces wrong and should just shut up and be excited about what they are offering. Never have I seen Reaper dismiss anyone in the way DF owner/staff dismissed my concerns.

 

I hope Reaper continues to release dungeon dressing, furniture, and would like them to go into bases with bones. Terrain I am meh about. Drawing things out on a mat is usually the least painful way to play D&D. Looking forward to my GNL gaming mats. But I wouldn't mind more props and bases from Reaper.

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So, I'd say, based on the responses and my own experience, that the majority of the demand for buildings, dungeon-dressings, and accessories/weapons/etc. comes from:

 

  1. Wargamers and Skirmish Gamers:  terrain and buildings are an integral part of these games; Bones scenic items save these gamers time and money
  2. Modelers and Diorama Artists:  terrain and buildings add interest and depth to the dioramas and provide elaborate bases and backgrounds for the featured miniatures and scenes, and the weapons can be used as part of the modeling and diorama-building experience as scenic elements and for customizing models; Bones scenic items are as much a part of their miniature-painting and diorama-building art as the character models themselves
  3. Casual Miniatures Painters/Modders:  weapons and other accessories can be used for weapon swaps to customize a PC character model to look exactly the way the player wants, and other scenic bits can be used for basing or otherwise customizing a character a specific way; Bones accessories give these miniature painters and modelers simple and user-friendly options to work with
  4. Tabletop RPG Gamers I:  some tabletop RPG cultures make heavy use of elaborate dioramas for anything from climactic battle scenes to every-day dungeoneering, blurring the lines between RPGs, wargames, and diorama art; Bones scenic items are an important part of the visual aspect of this style of gaming
  5. Tabletop RPG Gamers II:  other tabletop RPG cultures make casual use of props as visual aids for line-of-sight purposes and other illustration by setting furniture, etc. onto paper or dry-erase maps; Bones scenics are probably not needed, but are more immersive and pleasant to look at for representing overturned tables or broken columns than Cheetos, dice, and bottle caps are
  6. Boardgamers:  some boardgamers can make use of scenic and terrain pieces in games like Heroquest, where these items are a part of the boardgame experience; Bones scenic items can replace hard-to-find game pieces and expand the game in new and entertaining ways

 

 

Bones are a particularly useful option for any of these types of customers because:

  • The Bones material is easy to modify and work with, as well as detailed and designed for 28mm gaming use, making any Bones buildings, dungeon dressings, and accessories welcome products compared to similar products made for purposes (e.g. more traditional 1/72 wargaming), from other materials (metal, resin, hard plastic, paper/cardboard), or scratch-built items.
  • The Bones material is more durable, portable, and paint-friendly than many alternative options, making them easier to transport and more likely to stand up to abuse.
  • The Bones material is a welcome convenience for those who don't have the time, skill or talent to make convincing scratch-built and/or papercraft items (young gamers, older gamers, new gamers, etc.)
  • The Bones items and accessories are inexpensive, making them a more attractive option than metal or custom-built resin items which can sometimes get rather pricy.

 

Did I forget anything/anyone?

 

 

Hopefully that provides the answer you were looking for? 

Edited by YronimosW
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