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Dracolisk, 03703 and 77379 Side by Side

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Dang you Andy, I was excited for an update on painting and I come in here only to find you are stripping primed figure.  :down:

 

Yeah, overnight should be fine and scrub with old stiff bristled tooth brush or dremel tool as stated above.

 

Now get back to work you slacker!  ::P:

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Dang you Andy, I was excited for an update on painting and I come in here only to find you are stripping primed figure.  :down:

 

Yeah, overnight should be fine and scrub with old stiff bristled tooth brush or dremel tool as stated above.

 

Now get back to work you slacker!  ::P:

DOH!

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Stripped, primed, and basecoated.

 

One is based in Blue Liner/Brown Liner.  The other is Olive Drab for the body scales and Christmas Wreath for the skin areas. Christmas Wreath doesn't cover well.  That's 4 coats on the wings and 2 on the legs.  I'll need to do several more to get a good even base coat.

 

Next I'll start highlighting the dark one and shading the light one.  It should be an interesting experiment.

 

post-140-0-33934500-1438226702_thumb.jpg

 

 

Andy

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You alluded to it in the OP, but are you trying for identical color schemes, with essentially the same shadows, mid tones, and highlights? Or just the same ballpark?

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You alluded to it in the OP, but are you trying for identical color schemes, with essentially the same shadows, mid tones, and highlights? Or just the same ballpark?

 

We'll see where they end up.  A big part of this is to see which method I like better. Which produces better shadows? Which has brighter highlights?  Which is faster?  Which gives me the most control?  Is one method better, or just perceived to be so by its proponents.  But yes, I'll be using a similar color scheme on both.  In the end they should both be olive with bright, acid green points.

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Clearly the only answer is for Andy to fly me to his location and teach me his technique so I can be well informed on the second technique. :D

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You alluded to it in the OP, but are you trying for identical color schemes, with essentially the same shadows, mid tones, and highlights? Or just the same ballpark?

We'll see where they end up. A big part of this is to see which method I like better. Which produces better shadows? Which has brighter highlights? Which is faster? Which gives me the most control? Is one method better, or just perceived to be so by its proponents. But yes, I'll be using a similar color scheme on both. In the end they should both be olive with bright, acid green points.

I've used both methods, and found both to be equally valid. I PREFER working dark-to-light.
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Sorry about your primer problems!  You have to make sure the humidity is under a certain level.  It should say on the can what that % is.  Then you can check the local weather report to make sure you are spraying when it is dry enough.

 

Me, I got fed up and only use brush-on-primer anymore.  Virginia is super humid, and my primer spray nozzles kept drying out, I left them for so long without using them, waiting for the weather to allow for their use.  

 

I love these kinds of experiments, though, and I'm looking forward to seeing how it turns out!

Edited by MamaGeek
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Good points, Joy. I tend to forget about humidity and we only get much humidity in July and August here.

 

 

So?

 

I was at Scout camp last week.

 

I started in on them again this week, but ran into a snag.  The paint I was going to base them on (Olive Drab) didn't give the right feel to my eyes, so I repainted the dark one in Brown liner and re-basecoated the mid-tone one in Muddy Olive.  This took them a bit greener, while still being in the olive range.  Yesterday, I highlighted the first two layers onto the dark one. I plan to continue layering that one today.  I will try to get time to take and post pictures tonight.

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Not sure if these will be my best work; I'm mostly just painting these for fun.  I did note that I seem to be rushing the highlighting on the dark one a bit to much.

 

I changed the base on the light one to Muddy Olive.  I basecoated the dark one in Brown Liner then highlighted the scales as follows:

 

  • 4 Brown Liner:1 Muddy Olive
  • Brown Liner:Muddy Olive
  • 2 Brown Liner:6 Muddy Olive

 

Next I'll do a layer of muddy olive and then progress on towards brighter acid greens at the tips.

 

post-140-0-30670000-1439613043_thumb.jpg

 

 

I'm not sure how much I'll have time for these in the next couple of weeks.  I just got a really awesome new sculpting commission that I am really itching to jump on, so these guys might take a back seat to that for a bit.

 

Have a great night,

 

Andy

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Looks good!

Can you (Pretty Please!) maybe show us a WiP of the new commission? Or at least a finished green?

Good luck and enjoy!

 

8)

George

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Looks good!

Can you (Pretty Please!) maybe show us a WiP of the new commission? Or at least a finished green?

Good luck and enjoy!

 

8)

George

 

I'll ask my client.  Some allow me to show WIPs, others do not.

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Looks good!

Can you (Pretty Please!) maybe show us a WiP of the new commission? Or at least a finished green?

Good luck and enjoy!

 

8)

George

 

I'll ask my client.  Some allow me to show WIPs, others do not.

 

 

I got an answer from my client.  I can show the two main sculpts I'm doing for him, as they will be showcased in the campaign, but the stretch goal sculpts I need to keep under my hat.  So, look for the WIP in the Sculpting forum in the next few days.

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