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I'm ReaperBryan. AMA (Ask Me Anything)*! Part II


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Wait, it is? Why was I not informed of this?!   I'll mobilize the Guard immediately!     *makes shoom and whoosh and pew pew noises*   Huzzah! --OneBoot :D

I walked down the hall to his office and shot him with my ray gun. it goes, "pew! pew! pew!" and has a red LED. He never saw it coming. He made a satisfactory gasp of surprise and clutched his chest

Sooperkaladraxaliciouskhanjiramaalatrocious.

The origins of idiom are less interesting to me than general language etymology - like Why we have so many synonyms for words, or why in English cow and beef are two words but in almost every other language the meat is the animal (fish = fish, lobster = lobster is the closest). ((it's because the English had so many conquerors and conquests and we stole words from their language each time, often assigning the new word a positive or negative connotation depending on how the native speakers were perceived by the ruling class. If we liked you, your word for the thing became the fancy, posh word, and if we didn't, your word for the thing became the gutter version. The French aristocracy became rulers in the early 1000's, so the Norman words for the animal, bouf, poulet, etc. became the fancy chef speak for the meat - beef, pullet/poultry while to anglo-saxon word was looked down upon as the common word for the unclean beast.)) 

 

Would it surprise you to learn that one of my favourite subjects in university was Linguistics because I kept picking up weird bits of knowledge such as this? :lol: 

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Bryan, are you going to smite down everyone who chatters in here and answers questions intended for you:huh:

 

Asking for a friend... ^_^

Nope. It seldom stops me from also giving my tuppenny answers though.

 

 

 

Do you have a favorite marble?

Cats Eyes.

 

Do you scoop them out yourself, or does Buglips do it for you?

 

ew. No. These are glass marbles. I would never do that.

 

Have you ever eaten any eyes of any kind? I hear fish eyes can be nommy, but I've never tried them.

Separately no, but I've eaten things that still had their eyes in.

 

Did you see the conversation taking this ocular turn when you answered cat's eye?

 

Not really, but this is a strange place and I learned to roll with it years ago

 

 

The origins of idiom are less interesting to me than general language etymology - like Why we have so many synonyms for words, or why in English cow and beef are two words but in almost every other language the meat is the animal (fish = fish, lobster = lobster is the closest). ((it's because the English had so many conquerors and conquests and we stole words from their language each time, often assigning the new word a positive or negative connotation depending on how the native speakers were perceived by the ruling class. If we liked you, your word for the thing became the fancy, posh word, and if we didn't, your word for the thing became the gutter version. The French aristocracy became rulers in the early 1000's, so the Norman words for the animal, bouf, poulet, etc. became the fancy chef speak for the meat - beef, pullet/poultry while to anglo-saxon word was looked down upon as the common word for the unclean beast.)) 

 

Would it surprise you to learn that one of my favourite subjects in university was Linguistics because I kept picking up weird bits of knowledge such as this? :lol:

 

Would it surprise you to know I almost majored in linguistics precisely for this reason? The Air Force was interested in me studying Linguistics based on my ASVAB score and I was seriously considering it until I met Shannon.

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Did you see the conversation taking this ocular turn when you answered cat's eye?

 

Not really, but this is a strange place and I learned to roll with it years ago

Eye see what you did there!

 

Do you enjoy punning around as much as the rest of us? Do you think some of us in the randomness thread take it too far?

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Would it surprise you to know I almost majored in linguistics precisely for this reason? The Air Force was interested in me studying Linguistics based on my ASVAB score and I was seriously considering it until I met Shannon.

 

:lol: No, no surprise there. 

 

 

Do you enjoy punning around as much as the rest of us? Do you think some of us in the randomness thread take it too far?

 

Do you think any answer you give would actually slow down the barbarian in the slightest? ::P: 

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Would it surprise you to know I almost majored in linguistics precisely for this reason? The Air Force was interested in me studying Linguistics based on my ASVAB score and I was seriously considering it until I met Shannon.

 

:lol: No, no surprise there. 

 

 

Do you enjoy punning around as much as the rest of us? Do you think some of us in the randomness thread take it too far?

 

Do you think any answer you give would actually slow down the barbarian in the slightest? ::P:

 

Not in the least. 

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Did you see the conversation taking this ocular turn when you answered cat's eye?

 

Not really, but this is a strange place and I learned to roll with it years ago

Eye see what you did there!

 

Do you enjoy punning around as much as the rest of us? Do you think some of us in the randomness thread take it too far?

 

What sort of transportation would be required to take it to far?

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Someone provide me with a good illustration ov a Sophie-class starship and I'll maybe consider making one.

 

Yes?

I'd say it'd be a starship with batwings for wings. They'd have to be pretty straight tho. Do you agree, Bryan?

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The origins of idiom are less interesting to me than general language etymology - like Why we have so many synonyms for words, or why in English cow and beef are two words but in almost every other language the meat is the animal (fish = fish, lobster = lobster is the closest). ((it's because the English had so many conquerors and conquests and we stole words from their language each time, often assigning the new word a positive or negative connotation depending on how the native speakers were perceived by the ruling class. If we liked you, your word for the thing became the fancy, posh word, and if we didn't, your word for the thing became the gutter version. The French aristocracy became rulers in the early 1000's, so the Norman words for the animal, bouf, poulet, etc. became the fancy chef speak for the meat - beef, pullet/poultry while to anglo-saxon word was looked down upon as the common word for the unclean beast.)) 

 

My favorite quip about the formulation of the English Language is the "It is the result of Norman Men-at-Arms trying to pick up Saxon Bar Maids"....

Now if only I could remember where  I read that...

Heinlein?

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The origins of idiom are less interesting to me than general language etymology - like Why we have so many synonyms for words, or why in English cow and beef are two words but in almost every other language the meat is the animal (fish = fish, lobster = lobster is the closest). ((it's because the English had so many conquerors and conquests and we stole words from their language each time, often assigning the new word a positive or negative connotation depending on how the native speakers were perceived by the ruling class. If we liked you, your word for the thing became the fancy, posh word, and if we didn't, your word for the thing became the gutter version. The French aristocracy became rulers in the early 1000's, so the Norman words for the animal, bouf, poulet, etc. became the fancy chef speak for the meat - beef, pullet/poultry while to anglo-saxon word was looked down upon as the common word for the unclean beast.)) 

 

My favorite quip about the formulation of the English Language is the "It is the result of Norman Men-at-Arms trying to pick up Saxon Bar Maids"....

Now if only I could remember where  I read that...

Heinlein?

 

Sounds about right. 

 

https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Talk:English_language

H Beam Piper, who I was completely unfamiliar with until just a moment ago.

Edited by David Brawley
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Have you ever listened to any of John McWhorter's Great Courses series classes on Linguistics? (Highly recommended, btw.)

 

H Beam Piper, who I was completely unfamiliar with until just a moment ago.

 

 

I'm hesitant to say that you'll love his work, but I will say that I did when I read it.

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The origins of idiom are less interesting to me than general language etymology - like Why we have so many synonyms for words, or why in English cow and beef are two words but in almost every other language the meat is the animal (fish = fish, lobster = lobster is the closest). ((it's because the English had so many conquerors and conquests and we stole words from their language each time, often assigning the new word a positive or negative connotation depending on how the native speakers were perceived by the ruling class. If we liked you, your word for the thing became the fancy, posh word, and if we didn't, your word for the thing became the gutter version. The French aristocracy became rulers in the early 1000's, so the Norman words for the animal, bouf, poulet, etc. became the fancy chef speak for the meat - beef, pullet/poultry while to anglo-saxon word was looked down upon as the common word for the unclean beast.)) 

 

My favorite quip about the formulation of the English Language is the "It is the result of Norman Men-at-Arms trying to pick up Saxon Bar Maids"....

Now if only I could remember where  I read that...

Heinlein?

 

Sounds about right. 

 

https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Talk:English_language

H Beam Piper, who I was completely unfamiliar with until just a moment ago.

 

H Beam Piper wrote some rather good stories, Little Fuzzy being the best.  His life ended rather tragically. 

 

Bryan, have you read Little Fuzzy?

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