Jump to content

slowbro

Bow Strings

Recommended Posts

 Technically, almost anything can be broken down into source materials for minis.  (For example, you can make a magic staff or bow out of a decent-sized fish bone or piece of very small chicken bone. And I've used actual mouse and snake skulls as "giant animals" in dioramas before.)

 

 I don't generally bother stringing the bows on my plastic stuff for the reasons mentioned above, but I do occasionally do my metal ones. Most of the time I use the wire you find wrapped around electromagnets in electronics. I also try to study archery pictures to get the right positions for the bow and string when it's being drawn.

Edited by Mad Jack
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Technically, almost anything can be broken down into source materials for minis.  (For example, you can make a magic staff or bow out of a decent-sized fish bone or piece of very small chicken bone. And I've used actual mouse and snake skulls as "giant animals" in dioramas before.)

 

 I don't generally bother stringing the bows on my plastic stuff for the reasons mentioned above, but I do occasionally do my metal ones. Most of the time I use the wire you find wrapped around electromagnets in electronics. I also try to study archery pictures to get the right positions for the bow and string when it's being drawn.

So not like in Mockingjay, then?

 

(My kids, who have *taken* archery, were jumping up and down with fury that her arrow was on the wrong side of the bow and she is about to take her nose off with that bowstring.)

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Technically, almost anything can be broken down into source materials for minis.  (For example, you can make a magic staff or bow out of a decent-sized fish bone or piece of very small chicken bone. And I've used actual mouse and snake skulls as "giant animals" in dioramas before.)

 

 I don't generally bother stringing the bows on my plastic stuff for the reasons mentioned above, but I do occasionally do my metal ones. Most of the time I use the wire you find wrapped around electromagnets in electronics. I also try to study archery pictures to get the right positions for the bow and string when it's being drawn.

So not like in Mockingjay, then?

 

(My kids, who have *taken* archery, were jumping up and down with fury that her arrow was on the wrong side of the bow and she is about to take her nose off with that bowstring.)

 

 

 Technically, which side of the bow you place the arrow on is a function of which style of archery you're trained in (particularly whether you use a thumb release or a fingertip release and the angle at which you hold the bow), and what sort of bow you're using.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Technically, almost anything can be broken down into source materials for minis.  (For example, you can make a magic staff or bow out of a decent-sized fish bone or piece of very small chicken bone. And I've used actual mouse and snake skulls as "giant animals" in dioramas before.)

 

 I don't generally bother stringing the bows on my plastic stuff for the reasons mentioned above, but I do occasionally do my metal ones. Most of the time I use the wire you find wrapped around electromagnets in electronics. I also try to study archery pictures to get the right positions for the bow and string when it's being drawn.

So not like in Mockingjay, then?

 

(My kids, who have *taken* archery, were jumping up and down with fury that her arrow was on the wrong side of the bow and she is about to take her nose off with that bowstring.)

 

I feel your pain. Sometimes I process books at work, which is good, but then I come across the romances, which are bad, but a lot because of this reason: on the cover they have a woman holding a bow to portray her as a strong and independent woman, but then they dress her in the puffiest sleeves imaginable. I mean, what archer would ever wear that?!? Aaaaaaaaagh!!!!! *gnaws on staff*

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Technically, almost anything can be broken down into source materials for minis.  (For example, you can make a magic staff or bow out of a decent-sized fish bone or piece of very small chicken bone. And I've used actual mouse and snake skulls as "giant animals" in dioramas before.)

 

 I don't generally bother stringing the bows on my plastic stuff for the reasons mentioned above, but I do occasionally do my metal ones. Most of the time I use the wire you find wrapped around electromagnets in electronics. I also try to study archery pictures to get the right positions for the bow and string when it's being drawn.

So not like in Mockingjay, then?

 

(My kids, who have *taken* archery, were jumping up and down with fury that her arrow was on the wrong side of the bow and she is about to take her nose off with that bowstring.)

 

I feel your pain. Sometimes I process books at work, which is good, but then I come across the romances, which are bad, but a lot because of this reason: on the cover they have a woman holding a bow to portray her as a strong and independent woman, but then they dress her in the puffiest sleeves imaginable. I mean, what archer would ever wear that?!? Aaaaaaaaagh!!!!! *gnaws on staff*

 

@Pingo

 

Did they teach your kids to shoot modern style or like medieval bowmen?

Medieval%20archers.jpg

Note the side of the bow the arrow is on.

 

I don't think the medieval artist got it wrong (but to be fair their are plenty of self-appointed youtube archery experts that all say, "well what did the artist know?"). But it is easy to find a lot of different examples from ancient cultures where the various artists put the arrow on the right hand side.

 

This is a youtube video (you might have seen) of a speed shooter from Denmark named Lars. He is nearly as fast as Legolas and he is placing the arrows on the right side of the bow. It is trick shooting, but it demonstrates it can work.

 

This next is a skeptical video critiquing Lars, (by a self-appointed youtube archery expert) who does note that there are different archery traditions still alive today where the arrow goes on the right side of the bow instead of the left:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDbqz_07dW4

(She sounds a lot like your eldest in fact ... to my not very discerning ears anyway.)

 

Anyway point is: either side of a traditional bow can work. No such thing as on the wrong side, particularly if we're considering  fantasy figures.

 

 

ETA: do the Hunger Game books get specific about which side of the bow whassername sets the arrows on? is that the criteria for "wrong side" in your comment?

Edited by TGP
  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I'm not an expert on archery, I've been doing it off and on for the better part of my life, so lets say 30 odd years. For me the biggest determining factor in which side of the bow the arrow rests on, barring a bow with a shelf, is the type of draw being used. I'm right handed, so obviously that influences what I'm saying. I use a modified traditional finger draw with four fingers. I put the arrow on the left side, because on the right side is too much of a pita. If I were using a Mediterranean draw or a pinch draw I would do the same. If I'm using a thumb ring, thumb tab, or thumb draw I place the arrow on the right side of the bow. In addition there are many different anchor points. Cheek, chin, chest, ear, etc. Also there are plenty of people who will speak authoritatively about archery and claim "this was how it was done," and they will be right for a specific time period, culture, or people. However something that holds true for a English bowman using a d section longbow at the battle of Agincourt will not necessarily be true for a Sioux archer using a sinew backed deflexed short bow.  I may not have gotten all the terms right here, because I'm a shooter and not a scholar of archery.

 

Also imo Lars Andersen is a tool. That is all.

 

It's most important to have fun, and use what works for you. Also, I love all you guys, and thanks for giving me a chance to geek out about bows.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I shoot my recurve, the arrow sits on the left and my anchor point is the string on my nose. I also tilt the bow at about 45* though I have shot it nearly horizontal when my arrow rest broke during a tournament. Works well for me. On my compound, the arrow sits on the left and my anchor point is my thumb in my right ear, though that is because of the release I use. I've seen others who shoot differently and it works for them. Then again I also don't use regular 3 fletched arrows either. Its all about what the individual archer is comfortable with. If you can reliably hit the target then your doing it right.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use cheap, off-white cotton thread. The nice thing about thread is that I can give it a bit of a wash to tie it in more to the mini, color-wise. I will link the show off threads where I did this with some Bones skeletons when I'm at my computer. The thread has held up through quite a few gaming sessions, as well as the minis being shoved back into the box with the other skeletons.

 

Huzzah!

--OneBoot :D

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

2)  At 28mm scale, a 1/16" bowstring is 23 micrometers.  Just a bit thicker than a human hair.

 

Which, incidentally, is what I used when I tried that experiment.

I only tried it once and hair is also what I used. The mini wasn't in a firing pose so it was easier. I placed a tiny drop of CA on one end then I attached the hair. I place another drop on the other end, pull the hair taut and attach. Then I cut the excess on both ends. I don't bother tying the "string" since at that scale it shouln't be seen anyway.

 

Haven't tried on a firing figure but I imagine I'd use 2 strands and start attaching at the hand instead of drilling a hole.

 

I only display the figures I paint though so not much handling. But it did break I think it wouldn't be hard to replace.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where would the string go on this mini?

 

60150_g_1.jpg (...it is: 60150)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where would the string go on this mini?

 

60150_g_1.jpg (...it is: 60150)

If you visualize him rotating the bow into the vertical firing position, the string would go under the arm holding the bow.  In this position, the arrow would be on top of the bow because of gravity, maybe?

Edited by Bloodhowl
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Actually, unless you reposition the lower part of the arm holding the bow, you won't be able to add a string to it. I just dug him out and eyeballed it.

If you have the bow strung but not drawn, the string would go right through the arm holding the bow - you'll need to bend his elbow up a bit more and his wrist down a bit more and turn the arms of the bow so the ends aren't directly in line with his forearm.

You can't really have him drawing the bow, since there's no way to reposition his bow arm so that his other hand is in the right position to be drawing the string.

 

The red is the string position as he'd currently be holding it - note that it goes over his arm and his draw hand is nowhere near the middle.

The blue is the position the bow would need to be in to line up with his draw hand (and an arrow in it) in order to look right.

Although you could bend his elbow more to raise the bow, you'd still need to reposition his entire wrist, which would mean actually resculpting it.

 

fCBsSA.jpg

 

The best you can do with that figure is to leave the bow undrawn and then add an arrow to his hand that's sticking straight out from the hand and not touching the bow, as though he's just about to place the arrow in position to knock it.

Edited by Mad Jack
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×