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Hi,

 

This is my first post on this forum.

 

I'm drawn here by the Bones 3 Kickstarter (and it drawn quite a bit of money from my pocket as well ^_^), And so before they arrive in a year's time, I thought I should try out painting a few Bones series figure to practice. I ended up getting some of the fire giants, and out of which I picked the bodyguard to try first. I think I managed a reasonable result so far, but now I have come to the sword itself, and I am a bit stuck. I want to make part of the sword look heated to emphasize the "fire" element, but this sort of special effect is alien to me.

 

I have painted a few model before, mostly Gundam plastic models, and I have painted a Tau Army before, but I rarely paint fantasy miniature, beside 2 dragon models (GW's High Elf Lord on Dragon years ago, and a metal Karamor Guardian Dragon last month), so I am wondering what is the best way to do it. Should I switch to an airbrush to do it? or can this be done by hand?

 

I use mostly GW paint, because they are the easiest paint to acquire near where I live (UK).

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Looking great so far, and welcome to the forum!

 

Heated as in an inner glow revealed by the various scratches? If so, then I'd approach it like lava OSL, with the most intense color (white/orange/yellow) in the middle of the scratch/gouge with a lessening of intensity spilling into the outer flat of the blade. I suggest checking out Corporea's approach on the earth elemental (http://www.reapermini.com/InspirationGallery/Entry/latest/E3638) for inspiration.

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 I agree with Mierot, you might want to try some OSL (Object source lighting). It can be a bit difficult but,the results are always fantastic. There should be a couple of threads on it here and if not there's more than a few tutorials on the internet. Welcome to the hobby and the forums and don't die!

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Also google images is your friend.  It is unbelievably helpful for finding reference photos.

Look up pictures of blacksmiths.

 

Check out Forged in Fire on History channel if you want a big huge reference picture on your TV screen.

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Just blend it from blackened brown up through dark reds into oranges and finish with a warm yellow. Or take it up to white, however hot you want it to look. Or have the 'hot' part in the middle and blend it back down at the end.

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Thanks for the tips everyone. I have had a go this evening, and ended up with this so far. I think I am too ambitious trying to make those tiny thin cracks the focal point of the heat. because the cracks are so thin, it 's difficult to get the paint into them, and I ended up having to thin down the yellow paint a lot, and as aresult, not showing up at all (the photograph makes them look much better than in real life. in real life, the cracks are mostly orange...). I will try adding more yellow to the cracks and see if it will improve the look

 

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Thanks for the advice everyone. At the end I did add some white into the crack  to brighten up the look, It look much better now. I have read somewhere that Future floor polish helps blending chalky paint together for a smoother finish, so I applied that, and it does seems to work.

 

I'm going to work on another miniature while the putty for this one dries out. I'm probably going to stick with another fire giant character, possibly the warrior.

 

 

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If you darken/tarnish the Sword more, your effect will pop. Right now, the contrast is pretty minimal on the sword. The effect is great, but blends with the metal of the sword a bit too much imo. Basically, just deepen the shadows of the sword, and the deeper you go, the more it will show.

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